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Author Topic: Recent Knee Pain  (Read 897 times)

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Offline JerryR

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Recent Knee Pain
« on: August 02, 2004, 12:25:31 AM »
I believe I hurt my knee walking downhill on a recent vacation.  After that, I danced a lot, and fast walked on a tread mill.

After resting the knee for several weeks, I started playing tennis and working out on a tread mill again.  The knee does not bother me during these times.

After exercise, and after sitting for a while, the knee is quite painful when I first get out of a chair.  After walking a bit, the pain goes away.  It does not bother me when I get out of bed in the morning, but hurts after it's been bent in a sitting position for a while.

I've read many articles regarding knee injuries and diseases, but none really matches the symptoms I'm experiencing.  Any suggestions as to my problem?  I have an appoinment with an orthopedist in two weeks, but I'd like to have some idea of my problem ahead of time.  Thanks.

Offline gainsborough

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Re: Recent Knee Pain
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2004, 12:37:36 PM »
An acquaintance, a male over 70, with arthritis, used to do a little jogging each week, until a knee became too painful to stand upon or walk with, although it could be flexed otherwise.
Steroid was injected into the knee which somewhat reduced the pain.
He then switched from jogging to cycling, resulting in a significant improvement enabling him to start walking again.  

Offline Heather M.

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Re: Recent Knee Pain
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2004, 03:35:08 AM »
Your description is pretty classic for chondral lesions (also called chondromalacia, articular cartilage damage).  The main symptom you describe is even called the theater sign--i.e. that the pain comes after sitting for brief periods of time, as one would do in a theater.

Keep in mind that I'm not a doctor, just a fellow knee sufferer.  But I've had chondromalacia diagnosis since I was 13 (I'm 34 now) so I've learned a thing or two.  

This exact symptom you describe is *usually* due to damaged cartilage on the back of the kneecap.  That's because when your knee is bent, the kneecap is 'loaded' meaning it is in closer contact with the knee joint and there is a greater chance for pressure to be placed on a damage area if the knee is bend to more than 90 degrees.

The first thing to do is to read up on knees, anatomy, and general conditions like chondromalacia.  Then I'd pick a GREAT orthopedic surgeon who specializes in knees.  More importantly, one who specializes in PFS--this is patello-femoral syndrome, and basically is a catch-all for those who have early damage to their articular cartilage due to bad tracking, poor mechanics, and genetic issues.  You can also get chondral damage that leads to PFS by having an impact injury such as hitting your knee on the dash in a car accident.  But usually it is something that comes on slowly over time, insidiously, slowly narrowing the range of activities that you can do without pain.  Does this sound familiar?

For starters you should go up to the links above and click on the 'general info' one right below the "knee geeks" title on the bulletin board.  Step 5 is probably the one that will most interest you, but be sure to look at the general knee anatomy stuff as well.  

Another great link is my doctor's web page:  

This is a link about chondral damage, chondromalacia, damaged articular cartilage.  It should be helpful.
http://www.steadman-hawkins.com/knee_chondral/overview.asp

This next link is specifically about PFS:
http://www.steadman-hawkins.com/pate/overview.asp

Be sure to look through all the links or tabs (overview, symptoms, treatment, recovery, etc.) on each web page.  To find a great knee doctor, you can use this web pages search feature:
http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/html/names/names_menu.html

Good luck.

Heather

PS I'm not saying you have this condition, but the symptom you describe is so classic that this is probably where a physical therapist or orthopedic surgeon would start--by looking at your knee mechanics and seeing if everything is properly aligned and the muscles are strong.  Most PFS cases can be resolved without surgery.
Scope #1: LR, part. menisectomy w/cyst, chondroplasty
#2-#5: Lysis of adhesions/scar tissue, AIR, patellar tendon debridement, infections, MUA, insufflation
#6: IT band release / Z-Plasty, synovectomy, LOA/AIR, chondroplasty
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Offline JerryR

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Re: Recent Knee Pain
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2004, 11:37:26 PM »
Thanks Heather.  I've been leaning to the same conclusion.  The "General Info" really clinced it.  Thanks again.  Jerry

Offline Ron22

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Re: Recent Knee Pain
« Reply #4 on: August 04, 2004, 05:32:29 PM »
Hi Jerry....I agree with heather..chronomalacia is one of the many features of my poor right knee(it's been repaired and beaten up not unlike an overused underfunded NYC hi-way.....let me know if you have any specific questions.....it can be painful and annyoying..

have a great pain free (as possible) day

cheers,

ron
Surgery #1 ACL/LR/Mdl Mesniscus
Surgery #2 Vascular Repair
Surgery#3 ACL/Ltl Mesniscus/MCL
Surgery#4 Vascular Repair
Surgery#5 Maquet/Bone Graft/Screw/LR/ACL
Arthritis/Knee/Hip
Necrosis/Hip
PFS/Chronomalacia
RSD
Vascular Issues
All on Right Leg