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Author Topic: Osteochondromatosis - Anyone?  (Read 2424 times)

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Offline limp

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Osteochondromatosis - Anyone?
« on: October 31, 2002, 12:22:39 AM »
Following knee arthroscopy which showed lots of cartlidge debris but no cartilidge damage, my specialist thinks I may have osteochondromatosis, otherwise known as knee mice  ???

I want to know more about this condition but can find no mention of it here.  Does anyone know where I can find out more about it?

Offline Linda

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Re: Osteochondromatosis - Anyone?
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2002, 01:20:50 AM »
Hi,

Try this site. It is a basic explanation: http://www.arthritis.co.za/synchondr.html
You can also type Synovial Osteochondromatosis into your search engine and get a fair amount of sites to look at.

Good luck!
Linda
LR and Chondrplasty 1/22/02, Clean-up, Chondroplasty and biopsy 6/4/02, AC Implant 11/6/02, Micro fracture and adhesion clean up 8/12/03

Offline Linda

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Re: Osteochondromatosis - Anyone?
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2002, 02:14:08 AM »
Hello again,

One more place to go: http://www.medmedia.com/o6/145.htm
Did you have a total open synovectomy? Is that what your OS is suggesting? What else did your OS tell you about it?

Linda
LR and Chondrplasty 1/22/02, Clean-up, Chondroplasty and biopsy 6/4/02, AC Implant 11/6/02, Micro fracture and adhesion clean up 8/12/03

Offline limp

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Re: Osteochondromatosis - Anyone?
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2002, 11:15:05 PM »
Thanks Linda, the sites you mentioned were a lot more informative than my specialists!
No, I've had no procedure except arthroscopy and my OS has referred me to a rheumatologist. The latter suspects osteochondromatosis but needs to do more "research" before deciding a course of action.  :-/
I must say I don't like the idea of total open synovectomy being the treatment of choice.....
Have you had this or are likely to have this procedure?

Offline Linda

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Re: Osteochondromatosis - Anyone?
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2002, 11:32:54 PM »
Hi Limp,

No, I have not had the procedure, nor did I even know it existed until I looked at your post, and then another post about a different problem. Interesting that both problems seem to have arthritic roots though?

My problem is a huge defect in my articular cartilige. It also sends my research to arthritic pages. I am lucky and can get ACI done and that should relieve much of the pain and help me regain much of my activity level.

Let me know what else you find out. Good luck to you!
Linda

LR and Chondrplasty 1/22/02, Clean-up, Chondroplasty and biopsy 6/4/02, AC Implant 11/6/02, Micro fracture and adhesion clean up 8/12/03

Offline The KNEEguru

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Re: Osteochondromatosis - Anyone?
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2002, 12:53:34 AM »
Here are some case studies for you:

http://gait.aidi.udel.edu/res695/homepage/pd_ortho/educate/clincase/syncon.htm

Also known as 'synovial chondromatosis'.  Synovial means the internal lining of the joint. Chondro - means joint cartilage (i.e. the white gristle at the ends of the bones).  -atosis means making little growths.  Put that together and it means an abnormal condition of the joint lining where it makes abnormal clumps of cartilage material, usually right inside the joint lining in little pockets or envelopes, and these eventually rupture into the joint space and flood it with multiple 'loose bodies', just like the sort of loose body you get in the knee if a bit of joint surface is knocked off with a direct blow.  The loose bodies do not need a blood supply.  They receive nourishment from the joint fluid and grow and float around in the joint - some end up around the back, some in the lateral gutter (see the anatomy section), and some get caught in the joint and lead to catching, locking and joint surface damage.  They need to be surgically removed.  No-one seems to know what causes the condition - and it seems to be 'self limiting', which means it goes away equally as mysteriously.

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