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Author Topic: AF for 4 years + an unsuccessful LOA. Is there any hope for me?  (Read 439 times)

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Helpmeplz

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AF for 4 years + an unsuccessful LOA. Is there any hope for me?
« on: October 26, 2020, 01:00:35 AM »
Hey fellow AF sufferers. Iím 24 years old and had a meniscus transplant + OATS 4 years ago, after which I developed AF. My extension was about 0 degrees (no hyperextension), and my flexion was probably around 110 degrees. After my LOA in June I got my flexion back but there was no improvement in my extension. I can hyperextend it by force but there's no passive hyperextension. I still feel this great sort of resistance when I take strides, which prevents me from fully extending my knee. There is also a constant feeling that my knee is filled up with glue or some sort of material, I donít know how else to describe it. Also my patella is visibly lower than the other knee.

Seeing an AF specialist next month thanks to the recommendations here. However Iím terrified of my prognosis.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2021, 03:20:12 AM by derek117 »

Offline DogfacedGirl

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Re: AF for 4 years + an unsuccessful LOA. Is there any hope for me?
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2020, 12:20:25 AM »
The feeling you have of resistance and the knee being filled up with glue will be familiar to many on this forum. It seems that you do have scar tissue in your knee, but please be aware that surgery can make matters worse, not better. AF is driven by inflammation, and surgery causes a huge surge inflammation and wound healing, which is what AF is - dysregulated wound healing. The inflammation can be controlled in some people with medications, but in many others it can't be.

I only say this so that you're fully aware of the risks involved in having more surgery. This is not always explained to people, unfortunately. It seems that there is more risk from surgery if there is knee pain.

All the best,

Kay
1999 Osteoarthritis both knees, chondroplasty
2004 MACI graft L knee
2005 MACI graft both knees
2007 MACI graft R knee
2007 Patella baja
2011 TKR both knees
2011 arthrofibrosis

Helpmeplz

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Re: AF for 4 years + an unsuccessful LOA. Is there any hope for me?
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2020, 09:25:21 PM »
The feeling you have of resistance and the knee being filled up with glue will be familiar to many on this forum. It seems that you do have scar tissue in your knee, but please be aware that surgery can make matters worse, not better. AF is driven by inflammation, and surgery causes a huge surge inflammation and wound healing, which is what AF is - dysregulated wound healing. The inflammation can be controlled in some people with medications, but in many others it can't be.

I only say this so that you're fully aware of the risks involved in having more surgery. This is not always explained to people, unfortunately. It seems that there is more risk from surgery if there is knee pain.

All the best,

Kay

Thanks for the insight Kay. Unfortunately the MRI didn't detect scarring (only inflammation) and he said another surgery would've be of benefit. He said my ROM looks good and that my patella mobility wasn't good but "not terrible".

Do you think scarring might show up on an mri 6 months from now (a year after the LOA), once it has matured? I understand there is a risk of having another surgery but I can't accept this as an outcome, my knee doesn't feel normal at all.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2021, 03:21:47 AM by derek117 »

Offline DogfacedGirl

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Re: AF for 4 years + an unsuccessful LOA. Is there any hope for me?
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2020, 05:26:36 AM »
Hi Derek,

Most radiologists will miss scar tissue on an MRI unless there is distortions/displacement of structures caused by it, for example, patella baja, and even then a lot of radiologists miss it. I suspect they aren't taught about AF.

If you decide to have more surgery it will be of paramount importance to keep your inflammation as low as possible for months afterwards. It's especially important to NOT exercise too much after surgery, as this increases inflammation. Gentle passive stretching such as CPM will help, but be careful with that too. Supplementing with omega 3 fatty acids and low dose aspirin will help, if your medical condition allows them.

You can PM me if you would like more info.

Kay
1999 Osteoarthritis both knees, chondroplasty
2004 MACI graft L knee
2005 MACI graft both knees
2007 MACI graft R knee
2007 Patella baja
2011 TKR both knees
2011 arthrofibrosis