Advertisement - Hide this advert





Author Topic: Arthrogenic Muscle Inhibition  (Read 1586 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline frustrated101

  • MINIgeek (20-50 posts)
  • **
  • Posts: 45
  • Liked: 6
Arthrogenic Muscle Inhibition
« on: April 23, 2019, 05:34:56 PM »
Anyone have any experience with this?  I'm 3 months post patellar surgery and still struggling mightily to get my quad back.    Seems the best recommendation is to ice the knee for 20 minutes to shut down the inhibitory signals and then do the workout after.  I used it before the elliptical on Sunday and it felt pretty good but used it before lifting today and didn't notice much of a difference.  I've done a search of the forums and only found 2 postings on it but I'm sure I'm not the only one experiencing it.  Will report back if my quad grows back.

Offline frustrated101

  • MINIgeek (20-50 posts)
  • **
  • Posts: 45
  • Liked: 6
Re: Arthrogenic Muscle Inhibition
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2019, 07:48:47 PM »
Ok, so it doesn't seem like there's much interest in this but it's such a difficult thing to overcome if you encounter it so I'm posting my plan to beat it and hopefully some people will be able to benefit from it in the future. 

1) Ice down knee for 20 minutes- up to the proximal pole of the patella.  Not the muscle.
-completely shut down ANY inhibitory signals sent from the knee to the quad
2) Hit the elliptical for 10 minutes
-warm up the the quad and the electrical circuits
3) Ice down the knee again
-turn back off any inhibitory signals
4) Terminal knee extensions with legweights.  3 sets, 8 reps, increasing amounts of weight.
5) Ice down knee again
6) Hit the elliptical for another 20 minutes, eventually getting up to 60 minutes total.
7) 1g protein/kg IBW daily. 
100g chicken breast=30g protein
1 egg white=6 g protein
8) Rest every other day.

*if this doesn't bring my leg back, I'm out of answers and hope.  I've tried everything I can think of.  PT, NMES, time.  Wish me luck.
-Bill


https://cdn.zephyrcms.com/e3ca873e-bbc2-4098-bd66-366f172e913b/-/inline/yes/z.13%20Treating%20persistent%20muscle%20inhibition_Thursday.pdf
« Last Edit: May 02, 2019, 08:39:58 PM by frustrated101 »

Offline Brandon123

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 411
  • Liked: 45
Re: Arthrogenic Muscle Inhibition
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2019, 04:57:59 PM »
Hi Bill,

I can share my story with quadriceps inhibition that perhaps can give you some hope. In 2009 I had a arthroscopy/chondroplasty in my right knee. I didn't know anything about these things back then, but noticed after a few weeks that my quads didn't react normally. I kind of freaked out when noticing that my patella tendon didn't tense up like normal when I tried to squat a bit. My quads atrophied of course. As said, I didn't know much about knees/PT etc. back then and just figured all will go back to normal if I just try do the PT as recommended after surgery and walk normal (I had difficulty extending the leg fully when walking for quite a while). After a few months, the quads started to work more normally again and eventually I got my normal quads volume back just from gentle PT, normal walking, climbing stairs etc. No special training or nothing. My PT said that my previously inhibited quads looked all fine and symmetric compared to the healthy leg a year or so after my surgery.

So what I'm saying is basically that quads inhibition can last quite a while after surgery (in my case, many months) and then go away gradually. And you can get your quads back to normal (unless your 'normal' means very muscular) with just gentle PT and everyday activities like walking, standing, climbing stairs etc. At least that's my experience. Of course, I do recommend people to be more engaged in their recovery and take it more seriously than I did back then. But I had no idea about these things and just assumed you have a surgery and then you're 'fixed' and don't have to care much more about it :)     
« Last Edit: May 08, 2019, 03:24:40 PM by Brandon123 »
RK sharp pain while running, diagnosis chondromalacia patellae 6/09
RK arthroscopic chondroplasty 9/09
RK rehab, recovery, 90% normal, started running again -> back to square one 5/15
RK diagnosis patellofemoral arthritis + LK diagnosis chondromalacia patellae 8/15 -> conservative treatment

Offline frustrated101

  • MINIgeek (20-50 posts)
  • **
  • Posts: 45
  • Liked: 6
Re: Arthrogenic Muscle Inhibition
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2019, 01:37:37 PM »
Thanks Brandon for the response.  It seems all knee surgeries pose risk for quadriceps atrophy and arthrogenic inhibition but I donít know if my actual quadricep muscles (vastus lateralis/vastis medialis) were accidentally cut into by extending the unnecessary lateral and medial releases too far further compounding an already moronic decision by the idiot who performed surgery on me.  The muscles on my left leg just don't look normal in addition to being atrophied.

What really gets me is my surgeon was such a POS that, despite the exorbitant amount of money paid to him to perform the surgery, it was likely he let his apprentice surgeon take the reins for my left knee.  I'd say it's more likely than not based on several reasons. 

So on top of all the other bs the surgeon did (offering both knees at the same time, lying to my insurance company to maximize billing, cutting out my asymptomatic medial plicas and of course doing uneccessary lateral and medial releases to my knees despite coming to an agreement before surgery that no releases would be done) I get to think about the fact that it was likely some idiot junior apprentice surgeon who operated on my left knee and quite possibly cut into the muscles along with damaging my retinacular structures. 

I measured my left quad the other day and it's at least 1 inch smaller than the right knee.  I'm still new to the pre-workout cryotherapy treatments so maybe in a month I will be able to definitively say I've noticed some growth of the muscle.  Until then, my inescapable nightmare continues.
-Bill   















support