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Author Topic: 10 things I learned... from having years of knee issues  (Read 572 times)

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Offline reflex_nl

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10 things I learned... from having years of knee issues
« on: September 30, 2018, 08:55:33 PM »
After 10+ years of knee issues, 3 surgeries, months of PT and more I just made a list of things I learned that could be helpful to anyone suffering from knee problems. I'm no doctor, all is based on experience, learning, forums, medical articles etc.

Feel free to add your "top 10" list, learnings and/or comments.

Knee pain: Pain is typically coming from the bones, ligaments attachment areas or inflamed membranes. These elements have nerves that can transmit the pain. For example, cartilage doesn't carry much blood vessels or nerves and can therefore not transmit pain, this is usually coming from the bone underneath. Sharp knee pain may indicate torn ligaments/cartilage damage.

Knee Homeostasis: this describes the inner balance of your knee and is crucial to control if you would like to reduce your inflammatory symptoms. Trauma, torn ligaments, small cartilage fragments etc can upset your knee homeostasis and which results in pain, which can become chronic if untreated

Medication and ice: I would favor ice over medication; NIADS have nasty side effects and you cannot take them forever. Ice packs help to manage the pain and control the swelling. I've used them also when the knee ocassially became inflammated; even months after surgery. Of course, when sleeping becomes a problem; medication can help you to get a night rest.

Adapt your lifestyle: in the short to medium term... please accept that you have to adapt your lifestyle. You're having pain and this is a clear signal that your body need help (e.g. time, rest, ice etc) to recovery. Don't push it and take into account the recommended recovery times. No physical therapy if the exercises hurt. Secondly, knee pain may come and go in waves, don't become overconfident if you just made some improvements

MRIs/CT-scans/X-rays are not perfect: despite the massive amount of information they can provide, they cannot explain how you feel or what pain you have. Your pain may not be 1:1 correlated with the images. Some people with seriously worn knees, experience little pain.

2nd, 3rd, 4th options: Never settle for just one opinion or recommendation on what to do; find at least 3 or 4 "experts" in your field, share your story and MRI's, do some research, remain skeptic and certainly don't rush into surgery. Good doctors will listen to your story, ask questions, would like to understand your (sportive) ambitions and tend to be critical towards knee surgery.

Cartilage time: Cartilage injuries in the knee are the most difficult to recover from; they don't take weeks or months... but years. Improvements will come, but very slow and invasive cartilage surgeries hardly make it better even pro-athletes do not return to their original level after serious knee injuries.

Physical therapy. I would recommend it for regaining mobility (after a swollen knee/injury or surgery) but I see little use for it long-term(>6 mths). Most exercises you can do at home or in the gym to further improve muscle strength. Remember to always stay active/mobility within your pain limits.

Supplements can help. They are worth a try but the results vary. Use good quality products and try it for a couple of months. It may help to ease your pain and aid in the recovery process. Items I would try are Chondroitin, Glucosamine, MSN, Vitamin C, Green lip mussel, Collagen.

Mental: Fighting knee pain has a strong mental component to it. You often feel miserable, worthless or desperate. Especially when knee pain fairs-up again or and you still cannot do the simple things in life. Involve your friends and family in the recovery and if needed seek help to stay positive!
« Last Edit: September 30, 2018, 09:10:29 PM by reflex_nl »
RK Patella Luxation in 2000
RK Scope grade 2 damage to patella
RK PT for 4 mths, recovered 90% after 4 years
LK Patella Luxation in Oct'16
LK Scope to remove loose bodies (grade 4) to patella Nov'16
LK Lateral Release + MPFL Reefing + MCIC in the UK Dec'17

Offline The KNEEguru

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Re: 10 things I learned... from having years of knee issues
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2018, 09:31:11 AM »
Great appraisal.
--
KNEEguru

Offline reflex_nl

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Re: 10 things I learned... from having years of knee issues
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2018, 10:14:33 PM »
Great appraisal.

Thank you! - looking fw to hear some other "tips and tricks" from fellow board members.
RK Patella Luxation in 2000
RK Scope grade 2 damage to patella
RK PT for 4 mths, recovered 90% after 4 years
LK Patella Luxation in Oct'16
LK Scope to remove loose bodies (grade 4) to patella Nov'16
LK Lateral Release + MPFL Reefing + MCIC in the UK Dec'17

Offline mrkneeguy

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Re: 10 things I learned... from having years of knee issues
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2018, 12:23:38 AM »
This might be covered by one of them, but if not:
Pay close attention to what you eat, and when. It's absolutely crucial to maintain a healthy weight.

Offline davidroy50

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Re: 10 things I learned... from having years of knee issues
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2019, 04:55:07 AM »
After 10+ years of knee issues, 3 surgeries, months of PT and more I just made a list of things I learned that could be helpful to anyone suffering from knee problems. I'm no doctor, all is based on experience, learning, forums, medical articles etc.

Feel free to add your "top 10" list, learnings and/or comments.

Knee pain: Pain is typically coming from the bones, ligaments attachment areas or inflamed membranes. These elements have nerves that can transmit the pain. For example, cartilage doesn't carry much blood vessels or nerves and can therefore not transmit pain, this is usually coming from the bone underneath. Sharp knee pain may indicate torn ligaments/cartilage damage.

Knee Homeostasis: this describes the inner balance of your knee and is crucial to control if you would like to reduce your inflammatory symptoms. Trauma, torn ligaments, small cartilage fragments etc can upset your knee homeostasis and which results in pain, which can become chronic if untreated

Medication and ice: I would favor ice over medication; NIADS have nasty side effects and you cannot take them forever. Ice packs help to manage the pain and control the swelling. I've used them also when the knee ocassially became inflammated; even months after surgery. Of course, when sleeping becomes a problem; medication can help you to get a night rest.

Adapt your lifestyle: in the short to medium term... please accept that you have to adapt your lifestyle. You're having pain and this is a clear signal that your body need help (e.g. time, rest, ice etc) to recovery. Don't push it and take into account the recommended recovery times. No physical therapy if the exercises hurt. Secondly, knee pain may come and go in waves, don't become overconfident if you just made some improvements

MRIs/CT-scans/X-rays are not perfect: despite the massive amount of information they can provide, they cannot explain how you feel or what pain you have. Your pain may not be 1:1 correlated with the images. Some people with seriously worn knees, experience little pain.

2nd, 3rd, 4th options: Never settle for just one opinion or recommendation on what to do; find at least 3 or 4 "experts" in your field, share your story and MRI's, do some research, remain skeptic and certainly don't rush into surgery. Good doctors will listen to your story, ask questions, would like to understand your (sportive) ambitions and tend to be critical towards knee surgery.

Cartilage time: Cartilage injuries in the knee are the most difficult to recover from; they don't take weeks or months... but years. Improvements will come, but very slow and invasive cartilage surgeries hardly make it better even pro-athletes do not return to their original level after serious knee injuries.

Physical therapy. I would recommend it for regaining mobility (after a swollen knee/injury or surgery) but I see little use for it long-term(>6 mths). Most exercises you can do at home or in the gym to further improve muscle strength. Remember to always stay active/mobility within your pain limits.

Supplements can help. They are worth a try but the results vary. Use good quality products and try it for a couple of months. It may help to ease your pain and aid in the recovery process. Items I would try are Chondroitin, Glucosamine, MSN, Vitamin C, Green lip mussel, Collagen.

Mental: Fighting knee pain has a strong mental component to it. You often feel miserable, worthless or desperate. Especially when knee pain fairs-up again or and you still cannot do the simple things in life. Involve your friends and family in the recovery and if needed seek help to stay positive!

Very helpful post. I learned a few new things from here.















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