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Author Topic: What is a bone scan for?  (Read 537 times)

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Offline JuliaZ

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What is a bone scan for?
« on: September 07, 2018, 03:17:16 PM »
Can someone tell me what bone scan is for? Would it tell bone erosion, bone inflammation or bone dying if any? I have severe knee pain but all x-ray, MRI and bone scan come normal.

Here is my bone cane report says -
Normal symmetric uptake is present in both knees on blood flow, blood pool and delayed imaging. No area of increased or decreased uptake are seen. The three-phase bone scan of both knees is normal.

Many thanks!

Online Vickster

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Re: What is a bone scan for?
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2018, 04:04:42 PM »
What sort of bone scan? Dexa looks at bone density, CT shows more detail than XRay or MRI around alignment for example , SPECT CT shows degeneration and inflammation and so on

Why was the scan done? Whatís your diagnosis or symptoms?
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Offline JuliaZ

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Re: What is a bone scan for?
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2018, 04:46:06 PM »
Vickster Ė thanks for replay! I have severe knee pain for a few years but donít have a definitive diagnose yet because x-rays, MRI, and blood work are all good so doctors donít know what to do except pain pills. I asked for bone scan on knees and the doctor ordered it, because I worried bone erosion or dying but I really donít know what a bone scan can tell.

This is what on the report -
Exam: Three-phase bone scan of both knees.
Technique: 26.1 mCi of technetium 99-m HDP were injected intravenously with anterior and posterior projection blood flow obtained. Multiple images of the blood pool and delayed uptake were obtained in multiple orientations.

Offline JuliaZ

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Re: What is a bone scan for?
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2018, 05:19:11 PM »
This is from google - A three phase bone scan is used to diagnose a fracture when it cannot be seen on an Xray. It is also used to diagnose bone infection, bone pain, osteomyelitis, as well as other bone diseases.

Oh well, can't believe all is well while I am having so much pain.

Offline James NZ

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Re: What is a bone scan for?
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2018, 05:32:33 PM »
Hi julia, where is your pain?

Offline victoriagar

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Re: What is a bone scan for?
« Reply #5 on: November 23, 2018, 01:04:05 PM »
I had a bone scan to check for any fractures, tumors or any abnormality with my spine cell activity and bone changes. I didn't have to lay down long but I had to stand for a long time and I almost fell over from that. The only thing is they inject you with a nuclear med and then return an hour an a half later so bring lunch and a good book and during the wait you need to drink a lot of water. I had a bone scan separate for my arm and foot and didn't seem to take as long as for the back. Bring your break through meds. Best wishes.
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Offline cspike2

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Re: What is a bone scan for?
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2018, 06:43:20 PM »
The Dr I saw in SF uses bone scan to gauge the homeostatic condition of the knee joint.  The radioactive die will show up on cells that are in a state of rapid repair.  There are two cells responsible for bone 'maintenance', ensuring your bones are healthy.  Osteoclasts absorb bone tissue during growth and healing, and Osteoblasts provide the matrix for for bone formation.  I was told to think of it as repairing a brick wall.  One cell removes the bricks and cleans things up, and the other cell lays down the new mortar and bricks to rebuild the wall.  I think for all bones this occurs at a given, 'normal' rate (which I can't define, sorry), but for bones that are damaged or not in an homeostatic state (knee joint), this repair and replace process is occurring more rapidly.  This is where the radioactive die will show up in a bone scan.