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Author Topic: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy  (Read 6604 times)

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Offline slightfield

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Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« on: April 19, 2017, 05:12:07 AM »
Getting ready for my open wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy (DFO):  Let's see... I rearranged my bedroom, making it much easier to get around on crutches, I'd imagine since I tried to remove any potential trip hazards. I ordered the following supplies from Amazon: bathing wipes, crutch pads and a bottle of hibiclens. At Costco I stocked up on: Saran Wrap, lentils, Whey Protein powder, berries, veggies, calcium/ vitamin D/ vitamin E supplements. At Home Depot I got a shower extension arm and installed it. Feeling pretty good about progress on prep. Oh, for those who are wondering my scheduled surgery date is in 2 WEEKS. I still feel like there is lots to do to get ready and am very glad I found this forum. I still need: a shower chair, possibly a commode (?) Torex Leg cold Therapy (I heard this was a must-have), extra pillows (who doesn't), and possibly a foam roller or hand-held massaging devise. I will post again soon!     
« Last Edit: April 19, 2017, 03:09:04 PM by slightfield »

Offline slightfield

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2017, 02:39:01 AM »
Today I found a wheelchair with leg extender and a walker. I also found a shower seat. I called around to local physical therapist offices to narrow down where I will go once I am released to start PT. I was able to interview a physical therapist over the phone who was highly recommended near where I live, which I was thankful for. The PT advised I use a walker for additional stability, for those nights when you're groggy and need to use the restroom in the middle of the night.  I am also considering about getting a cryo cuff or Torex (I saw this was recommended on a previous diary) for swelling. I was also told to get lots of night-gowns, too. So all in all, I am still prepping. I'm only 10 days away from surgery now. 

Offline slightfield

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2017, 04:30:32 AM »
6 days from surgery now and I feel more comfortable with it.  I think I just want to hurry and get it over with so the anticipation and nervousness subsides. I almost would rather deal with physical pain than mental anguish. I am still trying to find a Physical Therapist. Most I call and talk to are familiar with the DFO procedure but say they haven't treated one for 2-3 years. Not sure how I feel about that. Still, all will be well and things will fall into place. Wish me luck!

Offline slightfield

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2017, 03:20:54 PM »
3 days from surgery and I started getting a cold sore from the stress :-\ It's my body saying I can't handle one more thing on top of the anticipation of the surgery. I would have liked to be in 100% physical health when I go in for surgery, oh well. Work has been really crazy this last week, too. I think the pressure I put on myself to get projects to a smooth transition point is really adding to my stress. My co-workers are filling in for me while I'm out, and I want to give them the least amount of work on my projects when they take over.  Additionally, I am working until the day before surgery. I would have liked to have some time off before the surgery to "detox" from the work stress a little bit. As I sit here enjoying my morning coffee at the dining room table, I wonder "how am I going to feel while I drink my morning coffee in a few days", "am I going to physically be able to sit at this dining room table like I'm doing right now?". Lots of questions running though my mind, some more important that others.     

Offline slightfield

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2017, 04:15:35 AM »
DFO surgery is tomorrow at 6am in Park City, Utah. Wish me luck!

Offline JPUSMC

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2017, 06:05:24 PM »
Hi Sara my name is Jake,  and I'm currently on active duty in the Marine Corps. I'm scheduled for the same procedure JUN 27th and trying wrap my head around everything and i hope your surgery went well if you could keep me posted on how everything goes I would greatly appreciate it. any thoughts, experiences or just anything at all that you would share with me might help alleviate some of my concerns thank you for your time and hope all is well

Offline slightfield

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2017, 04:13:32 AM »
Hello Jake,

Yes, wrapping my head around this surgery was a huge deal for me as well. I am happy to help you. I had my surgery on May 3rd at 7am in Park City, Utah (about 90 minutes from my home). So I am 3 days post surgery. I committed to the surgery back in January after getting a second opinion due to UFLEXXA injections not producing results after a while. My diagnosis is Full Thickness Grade 4 Cartilage loss, grade 4 chondrosis of the Lateral Compartment. After the diagnosis they confirmed my candidacy by completing a leg length study and took a few more X-rays. The doc explained the procedure. I left the clinic feeling overwhelmed that day. For the next several months I would be doing tons of research. I did a lot of mental exercises as well such as meditation and active visualization. It helped me to go through and imagine each stage of my big day. From waking up and getting to the hospital to checking in and everything thereafter one at a time. It takes time but I found it to be well worth it. I went to a local Physical Therapist and began a home program to strengthen the leg muscles from my hip to my ankle on both legs. Depending on insurance I would say be cautious using your PT appointments.  Check into whether it is beneficial for you or not. Really, all I did were leg lifts and other quad strengthening routines, ride the stationary bike and stretches. I also started taking supplements chondroitin and glucosamine every day.
   So, the day of my surgery was a complete blur starting when I awoke at 4am. I made sure I had showered the night before and packed a bag with some belongings for the hospital since they were keeping me overnight for observation. Upon arriving at the hospital, I checked in and the entourage of nurses, doctors and anesthesiologists starting lining up. They got me hooked up to my IV and rolled me into see anesthesiologist #1, who would be doing the nerve block. Once they had located the nerve to block in my leg I remember being told I would feel a "pinch" in my hip (I love it when doctors say that  ::), "just a little pinch" or "1, 2, ..."). After this, I vaguely recall being rolled into the OR and there being lots of people around. I saw the lead doctor and his assistant nurse, then it went black for me soon after that. When I came out, I was in pain for sure. A different nurse took a while getting it under control which I was not a fan about. Before I went under, I was told to begin deep breathing and ankle pumps right when I came out of anesthesia. So I started those right away. I am a puker as well, fyi so the deep breathing helped. They gave me Vicodin and Dilaudid when I woke up that helped very little. Finally, after an hour of pain I was given Oxycodone 5 mg. The pain wasn't yet completely under control, so I pushed and got another 5 mg tablet. Once that happened, the pain was completely managed. I was much more comfortable then. After that they took my to my hospital room. I stayed there from about 1pm May 3rd till 2pm the next day May 4th. Do you have questions about my first 24 hours after surgery? I am happy to answer any.  Could you tell me a bit about your yourself? I'd love to get to know you better, we might be talking frequently. Looking forward to hearing from you!       

Offline slightfield

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2017, 05:25:16 PM »
Day 4 post op! Since I have been at home pain management has been a concern for me.  Not necessarily because my pain levels are too high, but because the Oxycontin and everything else I am taking, including Tylenol 500mg, Celebrex, stool softeners, and abdominal injections have contributed to quite the bout of constipation. This might be TMI for some of you, but not having a BM for 4 1/2 days is a very real issue that I'd like to shed some light on. I have been eating and drinking and moving around much less than normal so my body functions are slowing down with the help of all those meds. A friend of mine who has underwent several surgeries told me to get the constipation under control or else I would be in a very bad situation...she sorta scared me straight. After many conversations with her and more research I'd like to share what finally helped me in case anyone else could use some: Breakfast- 2% greek yogurt with flaxseed a dab of honey and lots of fresh berries, coffee on the side. At Lunch, a snack of 1 cup oat bran, 1 cup applesauce and 3/4 cup of your finest prune juice mixed together into a nice paste if you will. Then I ate brown rice with black beans and corn all mixed together. At dinner I had a few cups of Kale and Quinoa mixed together with some onion salt and pepper to taste.
   My recovery has been smooth other than one major setback the first night home from the hospital when the ice bag leaked all over my leg. Got the brace and dressings soaked. I spent that first night in a panic while my husband had to unwrap everything while trying desperately to dry the bandages and brace with a hair dyer at 3am. We were told specifically NOT to get anything wet, so this was a point of breakdown for me as you can imagine. I am also highly prone to infection and have had two different types of staph inflection within the last year. That might also help you understand why I say it was a panic moment for me. I have been regularly checking my temperature and everything is so far so good. Feeling like I am on pins and needles during recovery is taking a physical and psychological toll. Any cheerleaders are welcome here! I have been keeping up on my exercises 3 times daily in the morning, afternoon and before bedtime. First, are my favorite exercises, the ankle pumps and quad sets. I do a ton of these throughout the entire day since they help so much. The second favorite exercise is the knee bends, these hurt so good when I am doing them and afterwards the benefits are great and last a good hour or more.  My least favorite exercise are the straight leg raises but these too give lasting benefits after the pain of actually doing them. I have been able to get up and out of bed and sit in my wheelchair for about an hour during the day to enjoy the nice weather for the past 2 days. I am down to 10 mg of Oxy every 6/7 hours now and no longer need my nausea meds (Zofran). Any comments or questions are always welcome!     

Offline JPUSMC

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2017, 02:54:57 AM »
Thank you for your reply, I know you have a lot of other things on your mind. Back in 2006 I tore my ACL  playing rugby it was a complete mess. i had surgery on it later on down the road and made a full recovery from that. Two years later i tore my lateral meniscus, again playing rugby :-\.  that surgery went by fine and i was back on my feet before to long. in 2011 i enlisted into the USMC and have been active duty going on 6 years i have not made it very easy on my knee (oh yea i also tore my right ACL in 2009 RUGBY again) but that one is good and no follow on issues. I have been deployed to Afghanistan  and since 2015 i have had a debilitating issue with my left knee. Im at a point now that i have a 8 degree valgus knee due to  severe osteoarthritis in that knee. When i had my arthroscopic surgery 3 weeks ago the Doc said that my remaining part of the lateral meniscus solidified and was pretty much a rock. here are the results from my last MRI:
FINDINGS:
MEDIAL COMPARTMENT: The medial meniscus is intact. There is mild thinning of the articular cartilage on both sides of the compartment along the periphery. No subchondral edema. Slight osteophytic spurring medial joint line.

LATERAL COMPARTMENT: Probable postoperative changes of prior partial lateral meniscectomy. There is no evidence for recurrent or residual linear tearing but there is mucoid degeneration of the remnant of the posterior horn and body and irregularity along the apical free margin. There is severe chondromalacia on both sides of the lateral compartment with areas of full-thickness cartilage loss on both sides of the joint and frank cortical irregularity and subchondral edema along the central portion of the lateral femoral condyle on series 6, image 6; and series 5, image 6.

PATELLOFEMORAL COMPARTMENT: Smooth articular cartilage along both retropatellar facets and surfaces of the femoral trochlear groove. Slight osteophytic spurring along the medial margin of the compartment.

LIGAMENTS AND TENDONS: Postoperative changes of prior ACL reconstruction. The graft fibers are intact but there is some cystic change within the tibial tunnel which is likely secondary to some degree of reactive osteolysis. The PCL is intact. The collateral ligaments are intact. The popliteus tendon is negative for tearing or significant tendinopathy. The quadriceps and patellar tendons are intact. The medial and lateral patellofemoral ligaments are intact.

BONES AND SOFT TISSUES: Previously described reactive edema on both sides of the tibial plateau. Previously described lucent lesion about the ACL graft in the tibial tunnel. No significant effusion. Soft tissues of the popliteal fossa are negative. There is some degenerative change at the proximal tibiofibular articulation.

CONCLUSION:
1.  Postoperative changes of prior ACL reconstruction and partial lateral meniscectomy.
2.  The graft fibers of the ACL are intact but there is a lucent lesion within the tibial tunnel which is likely secondary to some degree of reactive osteolysis.
3.  Mucoid degeneration within the remnant of the posterior horn and posterolateral corner of the lateral meniscus.
4.  Interval progression of cartilage loss on both sides of the lateral compartment. There are now areas of full-thickness cartilage loss on both sides of the joint with frank cortical irregularity and subchondral edema. Osteophytic spurring lateral joint line.
5.  Degenerative change at the proximal tibiofibular articulation.
6.  No evidence for acute fracture.
7.  No significant effusion.

How are you coming along?
Pain?
moblity?
Range of motion?
Hope all is well keep me posted 
It will all heal in time
PS. thank you for your thoughts and time

Offline slightfield

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2017, 09:18:18 PM »
Hi Jake,

After all you've been through it seems you're a great candidate for the procedure. I want to also thank you for your years of service, you are a hero already without even beating this monster surgery!  ;D Not completely certain but your doctor may scope your knee just before performing the osteotomy to "clean out" anything left behind. That's what my OS did and he trimmed some prior to. So not only do I have the 10 inch incision on my thigh with the 30 staples, I also have two cute little holes in the front of my knee. Has your doc mentioned that he will scope before?
   Today is day 6 post op for me and I have some good hindsight! Never let the pain get away from you. What you read from many others is very true. If you allow the pain to "get away from you" or in other words don't take the necessary dose you know your body needs to be comfortable, then this son is an uphill battle that is tough to get the W. Some advise, figure out the pain meds schedule in the hospital and have a plan for when you arrive home so you remain comfortable. I had a 90 minute car ride home from the hospital on a bumpy and windy mountain road, so I made sure to take 10mg of Oxycontin and my anti inflammatory right before we left. Even then when I got home, I was about a 4-5 pain level when I left the hospital about at a 1-2. I was able to get back to about a 1-2. Although, right before my next dose of pain meds I'll usually be about a 3. Overall, really not bad.
   I am pleased with my mobility so far. Some high points are that I use my walker at home for stability. The walker is great and helps me to get around with more ease than crutches. There are several carpet to hard surface transitions in our home. The walker has wheels on the front two legs and those cute tennis balls on the back two legs. I can slide it around or do modified shoulder dips on it if I'm feeling silly. Honestly, the crutches the hospital sent home with me I haven't touched. Just don't feel safe on them yet. I put the crutch wrist pads on the walker handles since they fit. This helps my hands/wrists that were beginning to hurt from the back and forth to the bedroom, bathroom and dining-room table. If I transition from the walker to the wheelchair, I will prop my leg up in the leg extender. I use the wheelchair when I am up and about for longer than 10 minutes. I was able to sit at dinner last night and even watch a bit of TV! After about an hour of being up, I was exhausted and ready to lay back down in bed. Transitioning onto and off of the toilet was difficult for me the first several days since I did not have a commode or extender to raise the toilet seat. I was using my husbands arms for leverage and he was having to quickly prop my leg up with a small cardboard box underneath my foot once I reached the seat. It was an uncomfortable series of events anyway you want to look at it. Since purchasing a toilet seat extender with the handles on the sides for 30 bucks on Amazon, my mobility in the restroom has improved significantly and needless to say my husband is happier I am much more confident and independent. I am able to "scoot around" while in bed, so if I need to change my position slightly or little things like adjust the pillow height or reach for my water, I can do this independently. I almost always have my entire leg propped up on a big wedge (30 degrees incline) when laying in bed. I feel this has helped a lot with pain management, swelling and overall body comfort. As I said, I do my exercises 3 times a day in the morning, afternoon and evening. These are really helping with overall comfort as well. I was told to do quad sets pushing my leg straight so the quad muscle tenses in isolation sending the knee down as far as possible without discomfort, these act a bit like a massage for my knee joint and I enjoy quite a bit. Also, knee bends holding each for about 5-10 seconds, then I do straight leg raises. I can do about 8 straight leg raises with minimal assistance before getting really tired. I measured my ROM today. I can get to 40-45 degrees while bending from a straight leg position while laying on a bed with my upper body propped up sitting against some pillows. For your reference, I began these exercises in the hospital when PT came to visit and do them with complete fidelity daily ever since. I will sometimes do a few here and there if I start to get that "stiff" feeling. Anyway, I hope I can transfer from my bed to the lazy boy to spend the majority of my recovery days on soon. Cheers!       

Offline JPUSMC

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2017, 07:30:26 PM »
Hello again, I underwent the scope 3 weeks ago, and I already got my apts for the next 2 months scheduled out. My main concern is what the outcome will actually be like how high of impact activities that your surgeon said you would be able to do when all is said and done or how long you will be able to go without a pkr, or tkr I'm at a point that my career is kind linked to the outcome of this surgery and that coupled with the long difficult recovery I'm a big stress ball. On top of all that I will be taking orders to camp Pendleton in California effective Jan 1st which would be right at my 6 month mark hahaha hope all is well and keep me posted

Offline Gabisv

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2017, 05:53:55 PM »
Hi Sarah,

I hope you are doing well.
My name is Gabriel, I'm 30 years old and after some digging I found this discussion on knee guru.

I hope you don't mind that I share my knee story. 

My knee issues started in childhood when my legs didn't straighten as expected so I got myself a genu valgum deviation ?n both (knock knees). The deviation angle in each limb is between 5 and 10 degrees, so I'd say it's not severe.

I didn't pay attention to that issue , as it was more of aesthetic concern at that time. I was able to walk and run with no restrictions or pain.
 And I kept wearing long pants so it wasn't noticeable. :)

In college, while playing soccer(occasionally),  I got some injuries on my right knee which were mainly resolved by icing and resting for a couple of days.
Last episode happened 7 years ago. Since then,  I quit playing soccer and other sports with high impact on knees.
I kept however taking long walks and a couple of times a year I enjoyed mountaineering (medium difficulty).
A couple of months ago, the right knee got swollen and painful. So I had it checked it and had an appointment to an orthopaedics and also had an MRI scan.

It was scary to read the findings on the MRI: 4th degree chondromalacia in the lateral compartment of knee on the tibial plateau with associated edema.  Due to the valgus deviation, the medial compartment was OK and wider than the lateral one.
There was also an old small meniscus tear shown on the scan.

Three weeks ago I went to hospital and had a arthroscopic surgery on my right knee with debridement and partial meniscectomy.

However, the surgeon outlined that my condition will probably keep getting worse due to the valgus deviation that puts pressure unequally on the tibia . The treatment he recommended, given the age  was distal femoral osteotomy.
As the deviation is equally present in both legs,  he recommended that it should happen in two steps,  first on right leg,  then on the left one,  which hasn't shown pain symptoms yet.

However, this will not fix the knee, it'll just postpone the need for a TKR with at most 10 years,  he also said.


Sorry for my English, I am not native. I'm from Eastern Europe :)

How are you doing with your recovery?

Offline slightfield

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2017, 06:30:44 PM »
I had my 2 week post op appointment. Whew, being up and moving around all day really tired me out! I was able to sit in the front seat of the car instead of having to ride in the back with the seats laying flat like the ride home from the hospital. That was nice. The drive to the hospital is about 90 minutes from my home so I was already somewhat tired when I arrived at the hospital. Then I turned down the offer for a wheelchair when I entered the hospital and instead chose to use my walked to hop down the long hallway. I don't remember this hallway being that LONG! I was a sweaty mess by the time I got to the front desk to check in so resting in the lobby for a few really felt good. When I was called, I had more "walker-hopping" to do to get to my room. Sweating, I sat in a chair and was assisted to prop my leg onto a step stool looking thing. The assistant removed all wrap and dressing and said my incision looked good. I was surprised how good it looked too! Although there were a couple skin flaps noted. Oh well. I've had two different forms of staph in the last year so I was anticipating the removal of the wrap and my incision looking much worse than it did so I was happy about that aside from the skin flaps. Then, all 39 staples were removed at the speed of light. Only one or two staples were "sensitive" when they were removed, the rest I could hardly feel when they were pulled out. Hurt less than stitches! I was pleasantly surprised because I wasn't sure what to expect since I've never had staples before. My incision runs along the outside of my right leg starting at the knee and working up about mid thigh. After the staples were removed, I was taped up with little steri-strips to cover the incision and assisted to hop down another long hallway to Xray. I gave it a go without my brace! I was nervous not having it on. Thus my sweating continued. Two standing Xrays one straight on and the other a side shot. I was tiring out quickly being up and moving about and standing for so long. The Xray tech also had to retake the side view to get the correct angle. As a side note: My suggestion is work on endurance on your crutches or using a walker for the first 2 weeks after surgery as much as you can tolerate. It helps to be up as much as possible... loosen things up, reduces chances of blood clots and just helps overall with mood, etc. Plus it will help when you have to go to the 2 week post op appointment, so you're not such a sweaty mess like I was ::)

The OS said the Xrays looked good. We could see where the osteotomy was, where they inserted the wedge (bone from my hip). The plate was formed almost perfectly to my femur just above the knee to the outside. There were no gaps between the plate and the bone. Doc said that he corrected at 9mm. In other words, the osteotomy gap that was needed was 9mm in width to correct my leg to neutral axis. The Xray showed that the cut was made almost all the way through the femur, very close to the other side. The hope is to slowly open the wedge to the necessary degree without breaking the bone completely through. The doc explained how they try to keep the bone in tact, but as you can imagine, when something hinges that far there is a good chance it will snap.  When they opened mine to 9mm, it "snapped" all the way through. That was one thing I was hoping didn't happen during surgery. The doc said that whenever there are significant corrections, chances are likely that it will happen. I could see where it "broke" on the other side in the Xray, although it lined up well, and I could hardly tell unless I really looked hard. 

After going over the Xrays, the doc said I can shower let soap and water run over the incision. The steri-strips would fall off in a few days and after that I don't need to have it covered. They fitted me with a compression stocking over my leg. It goes from covering my foot to as high up on my thigh as it can reach. I was told to keep it on at all times except for showering. I was also told that I cannot fully submerge my leg in water. The doc said I don't have to wear my brace unless I am leaving the house. The incision MUST stay out of direct sunlight. I think I will need more capris! My next appointment is June 13th and I was given a Rx to begin Physical Therapy ASAP.

I'm completely off Oxy except for before bed. I sleep with my brace off but still have to use the wedge to elevate and ice. Curerntly, my flexion is at 90 degrees and I can do 40 straight leg raises. Progress!

Offline slightfield

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #13 on: May 19, 2017, 07:10:11 PM »
Hi Gabriel,

I am happy you found me and no need to apologize for your English. Thank you for sharing your knee story. That is what this is all about, helping each other through difficult times. It sounds like you are in the midst of deciding whether to undergo the same surgery that I just had done 2 weeks ago? Correct me if I'm wrong. I am more than happy to help however I can.

I'm sorry to hear that you have been dealing with this issue since early childhood and I can only imagine how limiting it must be for you. Is your misalignment still between 5 and 10 degrees? Yes, it seems that as we age if we want to continue to be active there are limited options for us before we are "TKR age". I looked into several articles and made several doctor appointments even with second opinions to talk more about my options before landing here. With that said, I previously inquired about meniscal transplant and have tried Uflexxa knee injections for over 2 years before making the decision to commit to the open-wedge DFO surgery. I too lead an active lifestyle that consists of skiing, hiking, mountain biking. I am very outdoorsy. I came to a point where sadly anything active I did was met with significant pain levels limiting me on what I could do. This affected my self-esteem and daily mood. If you're anything like I am you aren't willing to let that happen. The way I rationalized it in my head is the upside to the surgery being that my active lifestyle could remain minimally negatively affected in the long run and hopefully alleviate the pain. Aside from the fact that this is a significant surgery and recovery time, I weighed it all and was willing to sacrifice a little in the short term to gain a lot long term, God willing. My OS was confident that the surgery would "buy" me about 10-15 years before I, like yourself, would inevitably need to have a TKR.

Any questions you have, I am happy to try and answer. Anything I can do to help I am more than willing. Best of luck in your decision and I know you will make the right one. 

Offline Gabisv

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Re: Sarah's Open Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy
« Reply #14 on: May 20, 2017, 08:58:11 PM »
Hi,

Yes, I'm 30 years old now and misalignment is between 5 and 10 degrees. I need to have some x-rays done to find out the exact angle.
 I'd say I'm short of 3 inches to get to touch my feet straight while standing.
L.E. It looks as though the gap is about 4 inches but this may be because the right leg is still swollen following arthroscopy
 This misalignment did not increase over the  years, but once the OA in the lateral compartment progresses it may get worse in a few years time.
However, I had no pain when walking short distances or doing not very hardcore activities that  involved putting  pressure on the knees.
Will see if pain becomes an issue once I get back full weight bearing after this arthroscopic surgery. The surgeon took out some of the cartilage on the debridement of the joint, so things may change as I resume activities. 

I still think I should get a second opinion or even third before getting into the DFO. I see people mostly get to the point of surgery when they are in great pain which affects their life and have no other alternative and are too young for the TKR  procedure.

Indeed,  I had limited mobility in the knees, but the pain was not there and I was happy with that because I'm not very comfortable with constant pain, even if it's mild.
I need to pay attention to my body weight to keep it around 80 kgs or below, but I had no issues keeping it constant until now.

If I decide to go for the DFO, I'm more concerned about getting an experienced surgeon to do the procedure, it's not a common procedure around  here, few surgeons agree to do it.
Also, the most important thing is a successful recovery and the family  support required  is important in such cases (it would be for me, at least).

I hope you are doing well. Keep being positive!
« Last Edit: May 21, 2017, 08:45:41 AM by Gabisv »















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