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Author Topic: Lateral meniscectomy post-op pain  (Read 681 times)

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Offline Miles2125

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Lateral meniscectomy post-op pain
« on: July 08, 2014, 04:43:26 AM »
Hi, I recently had a lateral meniscectomy operation on my right knee after dealing with pain for over a year. Before surgery, I hadn't been able to run for over a year. As a 22 year old who's very active, it's been mentally draining. Anyway, 3 weeks after surgery, I have EXACTLY the same pains (if not worse) than before surgery. I know that 3 weeks is short, but I had this operation done on my left knee when I was 19, and I was back on the baseball field in 3.5 weeks playing full game action, so I'm feeling awfully discouraged. All of my pain is on the outside, ranging from my calf up to about 6 inches above the knee. It's very uncomfortable, and I can barely even squat weight-free. Should I be concerned or let it play out? I rehab every single day, and I will see my doctor at the end of the month, I'm just feeling so discouraged. Thanks for any help

Offline Renee Puti

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Re: Lateral meniscectomy post-op pain
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2014, 01:01:33 PM »
Hi there,

poor thing frustrating - when you are physically active, and mentally ready.
Lateral injuries are rare did your surgeon tell you that, its only 2-3% of knee injuries. Can I ask was your right knee the lateral side?? The lateral side is very different to the middle and inside, its the only part that is where two rounded bones meet everywhere else is like a cup and saucer. SO I had my lateral meniscus completely removed when I was 15 and the other leg the next yr lateral, I have since had the middle done also ,and micro fracture to promote new cartilage which was a fail. This yr I have had a partial replacement on the lateral side.  I always tried to return to impact sports, but always had too much pain, especially afterwards. I can feel your pain, I know exactly what you are talking about.  Only this yr did I find out when I said to my surgeon, how come other people with cartilage injuries, or meniscectomys can return to their sports? He said well of course you haven't been able to, you have the two sharpest bones with no shock absorbers anymore, its not like other cartilage injuries. I was disappointed even though I knew its been such a long time, but people would always say whats your prob I had my cartilage removed. But maybe something you can look at and talk to your surgeon about is a cartilage implant, cause long term you will end up like me. So look after those knees, keep your muscles strong, and unfortunately you may have to change sports. Don't wreck them just for the sake of a few competitive yrs. All the best
« Last Edit: July 12, 2014, 01:09:20 PM by Renee Puti »

Offline Renee Puti

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Re: Lateral meniscectomy post-op pain
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2014, 01:42:39 PM »
Hi there, Just read this and thought of you. Copy pasted from an article I was reading.

Yet ways to treat and prevent arthritis are available, just not fully accepted or proven. If your meniscus is torn, it can be repaired or replaced by a donor meniscus replacement. There are several studies now documenting that meniscus replacement in the setting of arthritis returns the patient to sports without pain and the benefits last more than a decade. Despite this, less than 1 percent of torn meniscus cartilages are repaired and only 1,500 meniscus replacements are performed in the U.S. each year.

Articular cartilage can be repaired. A two- to 12-year outcome study combining meniscus replacement with the articular cartilage paste grafting technique demonstrated an 80 percent success rate at improving function and diminishing pain in arthritic patients with a survival of the implants estimated at 9.9 years. A 10- to 20-year outcome study is soon to be reported with similar encouraging results. Arthritis can be treated, possibly even prevented, and certainly the injuries to the joint that lead to more severe arthritis can be successfully repaired.















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