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Author Topic: Yoga Teacher with severe Chondromalacia.  (Read 4033 times)

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Offline mndyoga

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Yoga Teacher with severe Chondromalacia.
« on: January 24, 2014, 08:55:18 PM »
Hello,
Happy to have found this forum. I would like to share my knee story and see if any of you out there have similar experience.
I was first diagnosed with patellar pain syndrome about 14 years ago. I am now 44 years old and it has slowly gotten worse over years, and now it's Chondromalacia, despite physical therapy and lots of yoga(I have been teaching for 11 years, practicing for 17). I have very strong quads and very flexible hamstrings and hips, so PT does nothing for me really. I am finally seeing another Orthopedic surgeon and had an MRI done a couple of days ago.
For me, it's not a strength or flexibility thing. I am slightly knock kneed, so my kneecaps do not track evenly, so I know this is why.  I have so much grinding in my knees, I can no longer squat or climb stairs and finding I am losing my ability to do lunges. When I try, it feels like my kneecap is going to explode, no joke. This is heartbreaking for me, as teaching yoga is what I do. I have even started teaching more gentle and meditative classes as a result I can no longer demonstrate as much as I used to in class.
My Ortho said IF the MRI shows significant cart damage, Arthroscopic surgery may be an option, but he usually recommends PT first. I explained how PT has never worked before, as I am already strong and flexible in those areas.
I am wondering, does Arthroscopic surgery work well for those with the tracking problem I have? Any other types of surgeries out there for when it's not a muscle thing? Sometimes my right knee joint swells up so huge, and I can't even bend my leg. This is such a big deal for me, but the doctors all seem to treat it like it's nothing.
Any advice? Thank you in advance.
right ACL removal 7/1/2014
bilateral Chondroplasty 3/25/2014
Chondromalacia
PFPS
lateral meniscus deterioration
Structurally lateral tracking patellas
Mucoid ACL degneration and disintegration 7/2014
Fulkerson TTT and lateral release- bilateral (pending)

Offline JTB

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Re: Yoga Teacher with severe Chondromalacia.
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2014, 07:34:24 PM »
Doug Kelsey is a physical therapist, Richard Bedard is the author of the book "Saving My Knees," and Dr Scott F. Dye is an orthopaedic surgeon: all three have websites and have interesting ideas about healing and conserving cartilage. 

There is an idea that runs through all three practitioners and it is called "the envelope of function." Maybe Dr. Dye coined the phrase almost 20 years ago, maybe not. It has to do with keeping your knees inside their limit, failing to do so can disrupt "tissue homeostasis,"  which is a negative physiological state that promotes cartilage degeneration. "Squatting, lunging and stair climbing" are all probably disrupting your knees homeostasis. Maybe some of your other activities are too? The idea isn't that you won't always not be able to do want you want, but that if you do not get out of the negative cycle you are in, you will not improve and will probably continue to get worse.

                                          Good luck healing your knees.         
« Last Edit: January 26, 2014, 07:38:28 PM by JTB »
Bike racer electing sport-med scope Jan 2011 for patella catch: shave patella, MFC and trochlea (with sneaky lateral release) Grade 3 findings. @ 1 year, CRPS, pain inhibition, muscle atrophy, osteopenia, sudden bilateral chondromalacia. in free-fall 2 1/2 years.
Today on Strava riding well.

Offline geococcyx

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Re: Yoga Teacher with severe Chondromalacia.
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2014, 09:39:52 PM »
Quote
I am wondering, does Arthroscopic surgery work well for those with the tracking problem I have? Any other types of surgeries out there for when it's not a muscle thing?

Well there are surgical procedures that attempt to correct malalignment/maltracking. I have limited knowledge and no personal experience but you may want to have a look at this from the information hub:
http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEnotes/primers/patella-primer/patellar-tilt-malalignment-and-maltracking-whats-difference
http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEnotes/primers/patella-primer/surgical-procedures-correct-patellar-alignment
Also, in the patello-femoral section you will probably find plenty of people with problems similar to yours, and in the post-op diaries section you can see how people who has had such procedures are doing.

Offline JTB

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Re: Yoga Teacher with severe Chondromalacia.
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2014, 01:50:53 AM »
Am not here to beat down OS' and their mostly "structuralist" approaches to chondromalacia in the middle age populace... Structuralism has it's time and place. Am only here to say, admittedly as a messenger for orthopaedia gone bad, that you owe it to yourself to understand all of your options before electing to have an arthroscopy for PFS/chondromalacia.

Regardless of my low opinion of monkeying around with patella articular cartilage in middle-aged potentials, the fact remains, once cartilage is removed, it is not coming back. I won't get into what I think are the fallacies of surgical procedures that attempt to strong arm and redirect force in older knees. Gather all the info you can... and definitely do not limit your search to this website. Then choose wisely.   

                                      Good luck healing your knees.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2014, 01:54:07 AM by JTB »
Bike racer electing sport-med scope Jan 2011 for patella catch: shave patella, MFC and trochlea (with sneaky lateral release) Grade 3 findings. @ 1 year, CRPS, pain inhibition, muscle atrophy, osteopenia, sudden bilateral chondromalacia. in free-fall 2 1/2 years.
Today on Strava riding well.

Offline DawnettC

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Re: Yoga Teacher with severe Chondromalacia.
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2014, 05:39:09 PM »
I have had the same issue since 1989 and I have had 13 knee surgeries including an implant under my kneecap due to nothing being there and I was grinding something terrible.  I have now been told that I have to have a tibial tubercle osteotomy.  I have been scoped and prodded on for so many years that I can't take it now. 

Hope you get relief and don't have to go as long as I have.
Dawnett J. Cotton















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