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Author Topic: Can insoles help prevent or ease anterior cruciate ligament knee injury?  (Read 2990 times)

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Offline runnerphil

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Hello I heard on a website that orthotic insoles can help stop the stress on the knee helping to ease pain from and stop anterior cruciate ligament knee injuries? Is this true? I also heard that custom orthotics aren't needed either? What are your thoughts on this? ? If you dont have a clue what im going on about here the link to the article about this. http://nuovahealth.co.uk/anterior-cruciate-ligament-knee-injury. Or instead of wearing insoles do you need knee supports instead? Any help on this for me to make my mind up..... because I play a lot of sports and seeing as rugby season coming up I dont wanna be down and out (like what happened to one of my friends).

Thanks guys.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2013, 11:46:20 AM by runnerphil »

Offline IHMK

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Re: Can insoles help prevent or ease anterior cruciate ligament knee injury?
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2013, 12:37:58 PM »
Hello Phil,

I am not a runner nor a rugby player, I just do a lot of karate. I developed knee pain nearly 10 years ago and visited an orthopaedic surgeon. He sent me for custom orthotics, and those together with good shoes have kept me out of trouble for a long time. Unfortunately I lost track of how long I'd had the last pair. Their useful life is about 3 years, and shorter for me because I'm hard on them - my right foot pronates a LOT. It had been 4 years. Both my orthotics guy and a podiatrist thought this might have been the last straw for my knee. I just got a new pair of orthotics a few weeks ago and my knee, which was struggling with rehab, is a lot happier now.

How much your knee can be protected by either insoles or orthotics will depend a great deal on your particular anatomical make-up. If your feet over pronate, you should have custom orthotics. Don't get them just anywhere - if possible check with an OS to see if they can recommend somebody. You want the best person you can find to make the orthotics. My orthotics guy was recommended to me by the OS and he may be unique. He has a Ph.D in biomechanics and really knows his stuff. His orthotics extend the length of the foot, whereas most are only about 3/4 the length of the foot. They are what my feet - and knees and hips and back - really need.  It's possible you don't need any of this - you didn't mention whether you've been having any trouble with your knees or feet. If you haven't, then you probably don't need to be messing with them.

Look into injury prevention exercises like the PEP program. This was suggested by somebody here at Kneeguru and unfortunately I forget who so I can't give proper credit to them. One of the skiers I think!

Best of luck to you.
My knee story: http://www.ihurtmyknee.org

28 March 2013: tore right ACL (also meniscus tear, MCL tear ["Unhappy Triad"!!], tibial plateau fracture & condylar bruise)
28 June 2013: surgery to reconstruct ACL (allograft)

Offline runnerphil

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Re: Can insoles help prevent or ease anterior cruciate ligament knee injury?
« Reply #2 on: September 15, 2013, 01:00:27 PM »
Thank you for a really great answer!

IL be sure to have a check up, Iv been having a bit of problems with my new clicking and ankle when bending it. And you maybe right I probably just need to exercise and strengthen my knees to solve my problem. Thanks again.

Offline Snowy

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Re: Can insoles help prevent or ease anterior cruciate ligament knee injury?
« Reply #3 on: September 15, 2013, 06:03:13 PM »
I'm not a medical expert by any means, but based on what I know this claim seems very dubious - mainly because orthotics can't do anything to protect against the primary mechanism for ACL injury, which is a twisting fall or collision that places the ligament under so much stress that it tears. I don't think I've ever heard of anyone tearing their ACL simply through a combination of everyday use and bad biomechanics. ACLs are pretty tough; it takes a significant amount of force to tear them.

Having said that, orthotics are a good idea if you have an anatomical need for them. I wear custom orthotics and they have certainly helped with pain that I was getting from alignment issues (I over pronate). If you're going to invest in orthotics, it's worth going custom. Everyone's anatomy is different and you want to make sure you get a pair that addresses your specific need.

I would do some more reading up about the ACL, specifically through the information hub on this forum where the articles are all written by experts in the medical field. The article you link to is poorly written, contains sweeping generalities that completely gloss over key areas of ACL injury and rehabilitation, and contains no credentials or references. I would be very wary of using it as any kind of basis for decision making.
Mar 11: R Biceps femoris tear (skiing)
Jul 10: ACLr (hamstring autograft)
Mar 10: L ACL rupture (skiing)
Feb 06: L partial ACL tear (kickboxing)
Dec 03: R bone edema (motorbike)
Jan 01: R patellar chip (motorbike)
May 93: R ACL sprain (hockey)
Ongoing: bilateral PFS and OA

Offline Clarkey

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Re: Can insoles help prevent or ease anterior cruciate ligament knee injury?
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2013, 01:16:35 PM »
Hi Phil,

I have found that OSís & PTís are either for or against using custom made orthotics and will find that a small minority are not in favour of the use of orthotics. It depends on you posture and your gait and how flat footed you are and if orthotics would benefit you or not.

My advice is to go for a good quality pair of orthotics that are costumed made for the arch of your foot that a good reputable Podiatrist can do for you by getting a cast of the bottom of your foot and then getting a pair of custom made orthotics that can cost between £220 to £400 depending on the quality and the craftsmanship.

It is good to invest in a good pair of orthotics that ideally should be one mould as I have had awfully made orthotics from the NHS that just a rubber insole with a bit of raised rubber stuck on with glue that only lasts 6 months to a year if you are lucky enough and does not break up within 6 months.

I cannot invest in a pair right now as I am currently unemployed and studying and would not hesitate departing from £340 that's the cost of custom made orthotics from a top podiatrist in my region that includes the cost of getting my feet measured and casted and then the orthotics are made in the USA and sent back over to the UK.

Hope what I know has been beneficial in deciding if you need orthotics or not.

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RK: PFPS, Arthrofibrosis, Tendinopathy, Five cortisone injections
16/01/18 Anterior interval release, distal patella excision, lateral meniscal repair
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