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Author Topic: ACI for ankle - Advice  (Read 6348 times)

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Offline jwjwjw71

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ACI for ankle - Advice
« on: May 27, 2008, 06:36:22 PM »
Hello all,

I know most of you have knee injuries , not ankle injuries, but you might be able to help me out anyways..
My 2 osteochondral lesions are in my ankle, and I'm considering ACI surgery.  I was a very active athlete before the injury and I want to return to playing basketball again in my lifetime.

I know the FDA approved ACI for knees in the US, but not for ankle yet.  Does anyone have a guess as to when the FDA will approve it for ankle?
I know its a long shot, so I am prepared to pay for it myself.

Now, I just need recommendations as to where to go, and what doctors to turn to.  Can anyone recommend who and where they are doing ACI for ankle?  Who are the most cutting-edge (no pun intended) ACI doctors, the ones implementing the newest research into their surgeries?

I'd like this last surgery to last as long as possible so I'm willing to pay as much as I need to.  I don't even have the money right now but I'd go into debt if it meant having my health back.

Also, I'd love to hear from other ANKLE ACI veterans. 

Thank you. Best of luck in all your recoveries.
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Ankle and Knee OCD patients

dileigh

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Re: ACI for ankle - Advice
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2008, 11:21:12 PM »

Have you talked to Carticel yet?   I would start there.  There website is www.carticel.com and they have contact information there.  I know you can search for ACI doctors on the website, but I'm pretty sure most of them are going to specialize in knees and not ankles.  Although some are not quite so specialized.  I know my OS mostly does knees, but he has done some shoulder surgery.


Diana

Offline mayme

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Re: ACI for ankle - Advice
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2008, 10:46:09 PM »
Hi jw,     I saw this today & thought you might find it interesting. Good luck!


Total Ankle Replacement


CLEVELAND, Ohio (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- One-point-three million Americans live with rheumatoid arthritis. The pain can be excruciating. Now, there's a brand new implant that can help these people walk pain free.

 

Beverly McFarland has had 10 surgeries because of painful rheumatoid arthritis. Now she's going in for number 11! McFarland is the first person in the world to get a new type of ankle replacement. Surgeons at the Cleveland Clinic are trading in traditional ankle fusion -- that gives very limited mobility -- with a new ankle replacement.

 

"Instead of locking up those two bones, you replace the end of each bone, and allow the patient to maintain normal mobility of that ankle joint," Brian Donley, M.D., director of the Foot & Ankle Center at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, told Ivanhoe.

 

Surgeons remove the bumpy arthritic portion in the ankle joint and attach a metal plate to the end of the leg bone. Then, they place a metal cap on top of the anklebone. A piece of plastic is put in between to keep the metal from rubbing.

 

"The patients seem to be doing exceptionally well, Dr. Donley said. Almost all patients have had complete relief of pain."

 

Donna Maikens dog, Cleo, licks the spot where she had her ankle replaced.

 

"I was walking bone-on-bone, Maiken told Ivanhoe. I had no cartilage."

 

She broke her leg more than two decades ago. Since then, Maiken's lived in pain.

 

"It got really, really uncomfortable, where I could be up like three or four hours a day and then I had to sit down," Maiken said.

 

Just weeks after surgery, both women are on their feet -- pain-free.

 

"Every day it gets a little bit better," Maiken said.

 

"I get to stand up on it today to see if it works," McFarland said.

 

Since this is a new implant, there are no final results on how long it will last. The best candidates for an ankle replacement are people over age 60 because there's less risk of the implant wearing out.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT:     

 

Cleveland Clinic

http://www.clevelandclinic.com

(216) 445-2570

 

Offline TIBBAR

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Re: ACI for ankle - Advice
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2008, 11:36:58 PM »
Thank you so much for that post. I am looking at an ankle fusion and have been wearing an ARIZONA brace for a year now putting it off. I had Bilateral TKR 1 1/2 yr's ago and am still recovering. No pain in knees all in the foot. OS says for the fusion it is 3mo in a cast and NWB. I just can't bear to think of that so close to the knees ( I was off work of 4 mo with those) yet the pain is so bad w/o the brace and it is real hot to wear and only fits in tennies. Hard to find work clothes that go with tennies.
So I am ever so grateful for that post. Maybe I/ my OS could look into it. Maybe you just saved one person from a lot of pain and trouble ;D ;D   At least maybe there is some hope out there.       Hugs to you for this  :D :D
             TIBBAR the grateful

Offline mayme

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Re: ACI for ankle - Advice
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2008, 02:33:33 AM »
Gosh Tibbar,

How kind of you to say that--you made my day!   Good luck and God bless.

Offline Chondrosoldier

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Re: ACI for ankle - Advice
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2008, 05:17:03 PM »
Just curious, what are the main differences in the hyaline cartilage properties between the trochlea and the superior talus?  Are they even comparable?  The patella is totally different from any bone in the body...only free floating bone in the body with unparalleled compression forces and thus the hyaline is much thicker.

Random fact:  Healthy cartilage operating in healthy synovium is 10x slicker than ice.  No synthetic, including a great Carticel repair job can come close to replicating that

Tell us if Carticelcare informs you of any other applications for their product.  Anatomically, the knee mirrors the elbow, wrist mirrors the ankle and hip mirrors the shoulder but when talking cartilage repair, your talking apples and oranges because the lower body is much more load bearing and endures greater shear rotational forces operating in a closed chain environment.

« Last Edit: June 02, 2008, 05:19:39 PM by Chondrosoldier »
1997 L Traumatic dislocation/ACL
1997-2001 L recurrent sbuluxation
2001 L TTT Realignment
2006 L Patellar Carticel biopsy/debridement
2006 L Carticel 4cm patellar reimplantation
2007 R Carticel biopsy/debridement
 Insurance Battle
2008 R TTT 4CM Patalla/3CM Trochlea Carticel implant
Happiness!

Offline djs60

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Re: ACI for ankle - Advice
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2008, 11:04:49 PM »
I don't think there is anyone doing much ACI for the ankle in the US.  I vaguely remember hearing that Dr. Minas in Boston has done it, but I'm not sure about that.

It appears it is being done in Europe (Italy).  See:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18227232

djs60
3/06 left knee arthroscopy - grade IV lateral trochlea defect
chondroplasy & removal of loose bodies
1/07 left knee arthroscopy/cartilage biopsy
4/27/07 left knee trochlea & patella ACI with TTO

Offline khutch

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Re: ACI for ankle - Advice
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2009, 02:29:28 AM »
ACI in ankles can be done.  I had mine done Feb 16th 2009.  Email me privately if you would like the information on my surgeon and my insurance covered it.  [email protected] 

Offline momhanaway

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Re: ACI for ankle - Advice
« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2009, 06:45:32 PM »
I hope this works out for you.  Keep us posted.

Offline khutch

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Re: ACI for ankle - Advice
« Reply #9 on: December 13, 2012, 02:50:24 AM »
I posted many years ago about my Ankle ACI done almost 4 years ago, feb 2009.  Let me just say it is still going strong and better then it ever was.  Have had some knee issues in the same leg I have dealt with, but they are fixed now too.  I may not be able to be athletic like I was at 18 but now in my mid30s I am able to go to the gym on a regular basis, work with a trainer and start leading a healthier I life.  All thanks to my ankle being fixed. 

Once again if you need information on it please email me at [email protected]