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Author Topic: Has anyone undergone Dr Saw Khay Yong's Subchondral Drilling+PBPC+HA procedure?  (Read 18716 times)

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Offline TheFonz

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Hello everyone,

I have grade 3 and 4 arthritis on the left knee of my lateral trochlea and am looking for the best solution to my problem.  I just had debridement surgery (on 10/1/2012) and was a possible microfracture candidate.  The doctor decided not to perform the microfracture.  After reading many posts on microfracture, i am glad he chose not too.

I am now about 6 weeks post op and at this point I am worse off then I was before.  I still have very sharp pain under the outside of my knee cap.  So I am now looking into other possibilites to remedy my problem.  I currently have and appointment to see Dr. Bert Mandelbaum in Santa Monica CA to ask if I would be a Denovo NT candidate. 

I am also in the begining stages of contacting Dr. Saw Khay Yong, Located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.  I was wondering if anyone here has undergone Dr Saw's Subchondral Drilling+PBPC+HA procedure.  For those of you unfamiliar with his recent research, here is a link to it.  http://www.klsmc.com/in-the-news/insights/89-modern-arthroscopy-intech-articular-cartilage-regeneration-with-stem-cells.html       

I have read the entire research article and it looks promising.  I have read posts from one or two people on this forum that have undergone his treatment, but they stopped giving updates about 3 to 6 months post op.  So i don't know if the end result was successful or not.

 If anyone has undergone this treatment, I would love to hear your results.  Or even better, if there is a way that I can PM you and communicate with you directly, that would be much appreciated.
Check out the link below to see my journal of my Denovo NT procedure.  3cm x 3cm defect on the Lateral Trochlea of the left knee.
http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEtalk/index.php?topic=61437.0

Offline Mayou

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I have been operated by dr Saw and had subchondral drilling. You can read my findings in topic 'microfracture plus stemcells for multiple large cartilage lesions'. I haven't updated anything because there isn't much to update. I do my daily excercises and I get boostershots every month to keep the stemcells coming...

Offline TheFonz

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Thanks for the response Mayou.  I checked out the other thread.  It looks like your about 5 months out.  Just curious where your activity and pain level is at.  You riding a bike with resistance and pain free yet?  You able to walk up/down stairs normally? assuming you still can't run yet since its only been about 5 months. 

Hope everything continues to go well for you.
Check out the link below to see my journal of my Denovo NT procedure.  3cm x 3cm defect on the Lateral Trochlea of the left knee.
http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEtalk/index.php?topic=61437.0

Offline Mayou

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My surgery was 9 months ago and I am painfree. I can cycle with moderate resistence and go up and down stairs, no problem, as long as they are not too high. Running isn't wise as my cartilage is still too thin so it will most likely be damaged and damage the bone as well. Besides that' I don't run, ever  :)

Offline Chrisse

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Hey guys just curious, sorry for bringing up an old post but .. How are you guys doing today? Did you proceed with the surgery by Dr Saw? And Mayou how is your knee feeling to this day?

Cheers

Offline healingup

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Had this done 7 months ago also with a (complex) revision of ACL, MCL. First of all Dr. Saw is an amazing surgeon, not only for cartilage but also recon's. Never experienced anything like the quality of care as in KLSMC.

Anyhow, on the cartilage, I "only" had 5 drill holes on the trochlea (about 2cm2). Clearly feel the progress. I can walk stairs, but i don't do that too often as the cartilage still needs to heal.

At 5 months there was already full thickness cartilage (see picture). The remaining 1,5 years is hardening out of this cartilage layer, so have to do a lot of loading.

But my cartilage injury was nothing compared to some other patients. Dr. Saw treats some knees that have to be drilled on 80% of the surface. Seems to be the best treatment out there by far if you suffer from cartilage injury. But recovery is still a long process!

Btw. ACL heals 50% faster with stem cells as well with presumably lower risk of bio failure.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2017, 02:16:41 AM by healingup »

Offline psny

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Had this done 7 months ago also with a (complex) revision of ACL, MCL. First of all Dr. Saw is an amazing surgeon, not only for cartilage but also recon's. Never experienced anything like the quality of care as in KLSMC.

Anyhow, on the cartilage, I "only" had 5 drill holes on the trochlea (about 2cm2). Clearly feel the progress. I can walk stairs, but i don't do that too often as the cartilage still needs to heal.

At 5 months there was already full thickness cartilage (see picture). The remaining 1,5 years is hardening out of this cartilage layer, so have to do a lot of loading.

But my cartilage injury was nothing compared to some other patients. Dr. Saw treats some knees that have to be drilled on 80% of the surface. Seems to be the best treatment out there by far if you suffer from cartilage injury. But recovery is still a long process!

Btw. ACL heals 50% faster with stem cells as well with presumably lower risk of bio failure.

Really cool, after how many months were you able to bear weight? Additionally, how many total injections and PBSC draws have you had so far?

Offline healingup

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You should load bear emediately for the creation of type two collagen. As long as there are no shear forces (like with walking stairs, squads, cycling with high risistence). As time goes by the bruised feeling slowely eases. Thats when you notice that the cartilage forms. But it seems that after 1,5 years your knee really starts to feel normal again.

I had my second round of injections after 5 months. After surgery 5 double injections, then 3 every half year. aprox 600mio cells per injection of which a couple of million 34+ cells.

It is really amazing what is happening there. I dont understand why people still replace their knees (unless you are over 65 ofcourse).

Some doctors over here still do not believe it. Pathetic people. Not allowed to do it themselves because of strict regulation which makes them a bit jalous i guess. And they lose they "expensive" tkr surgeries.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2017, 09:00:37 PM by healingup »

Offline psny

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You should load bear emediately for the creation of type two collagen. As long as there are no shear forces (like with walking stairs, squads, cycling with high risistence). As time goes by the bruised feeling slowely eases. Thats when you notice that the cartilage forms. But it seems that after 1,5 years your knee really starts to feel normal again.

I had my second round of injections after 5 months. After surgery 5 double injections, then 3 every half year. aprox 600mio cells per injection of which a couple of million 34+ cells.

It is really amazing what is happening there. I dont understand why people still replace their knees (unless you are over 65 ofcourse).

Some doctors over here still do not believe it. Pathetic people. Not allowed to do it themselves because of strict regulation which makes them a bit jalous i guess. And they lose they "expensive" tkr surgeries.

Sorry, I should've worded my question differently. After the drilling surgery with Dr. Saw, how many times does he perform a stem cell injection? Additionally, are you allowed to walk, if not, how long did you have to weight to do normal walking?

Offline healingup

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Well after drilling 5 times every week. Then 3 every week at 6 month, 12 months and 18 months.

Yes partial to full weight bearing. But for people with drilling medeally and laterally it is more cumbersome as walking will be "smooth" probably only after 1,5 years. No sharp pain though, just bruised fealing. But walking will be cumbersome regardless if you have cartilage injury there. But I cannot comment on that from experience as I only had drilling on the trochlea. I am jumping on a (professional) trampolina for muscle strenght. No shear forces allowed on the trochlea, thats all. Loading is good. The more the better.

Ive spoken to patients who had it done 5 years ago and they were really satisfied. For me, I have to wait and see. MRI looks promising.

I was surprised by the confidence/routine way they treat such injuries. Its almost like: there we have a 8cm^2 bone on bone leasion. No big deal. You will be skiing again in two years time.

Offline razuzin

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Well after drilling 5 times every week. Then 3 every week at 6 month, 12 months and 18 months.

Yes partial to full weight bearing. But for people with drilling medeally and laterally it is more cumbersome as walking will be "smooth" probably only after 1,5 years. No sharp pain though, just bruised fealing. But walking will be cumbersome regardless if you have cartilage injury there. But I cannot comment on that from experience as I only had drilling on the trochlea. I am jumping on a (professional) trampolina for muscle strenght. No shear forces allowed on the trochlea, thats all. Loading is good. The more the better.

Ive spoken to patients who had it done 5 years ago and they were really satisfied. For me, I have to wait and see. MRI looks promising.

I was surprised by the confidence/routine way they treat such injuries. Its almost like: there we have a 8cm^2 bone on bone leasion. No big deal. You will be skiing again in two years time.
That's great healingup.
What specific activities which create shear forces aren't allowed in the first year? Is biking allowed?

I have a trochlear defect too, had a BMAC injection during arthroscopic surgery six months ago, and it's showing some signs of cartilage regrowth. Just want to make sure I don't overload the area if there is indeed some regrowth.

Also interested to know whether Dr. Saw applies his method to other joints. What about cartilage defects in a hip? Have you seen any patients with this issue addressed?

Thank you.

Offline healingup

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shear force = loading + movement. Biking with high resistance is therefore not allowed.

Other joints can be done in same way but are not done often (not seen any patient). Probably cause Dr Saw is a knee and shoulder specialist. But iam sure that it can be done at KLSMC. You can ask them to be sure. As long as it is a synovial joint where he has access with a drill.

This btw a huge step for ankle surgery as well, as these are otherwise fixated!

Btw there are clinical trials with stanford and andrews in the USA. So if you wanto take the 50% gamble you could have the procedure for free.

Without drilling there will not be a lot of regrowth. I can however imagine that the damaged cartilaged that has softened may become harder. I can imagine. I dont know. I wouldnt personally spend too much money on those injections. Better save the money for the effective procedure.

What does heal btw is meniscal tears. Dr. Saw sutures complex tears and then with stem cells these usually heal. That saves you a lot of cartilage in the future.


« Last Edit: January 18, 2017, 11:38:42 PM by healingup »

Offline razuzin

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shear force = loading + movement. Biking with high resistance is therefore not allowed.

Other joints can be done in same way but are not done often (not seen any patient). Probably cause Dr Saw is a knee and shoulder specialist. But iam sure that it can be done at KLSMC. You can ask them to be sure. As long as it is a synovial joint where he has access with a drill.

This btw a huge step for ankle surgery as well, as these are otherwise fixated!

Btw there are clinical trials with stanford and andrews in the USA. So if you wanto take the 50% gamble you could have the procedure for free.

Without drilling there will not be a lot of regrowth. I can however imagine that the damaged cartilaged that has softened may become harder. I can imagine. I dont know. I wouldnt personally spend too much money on those injections. Better save the money for the effective procedure.

What does heal btw is meniscal tears. Dr. Saw sutures complex tears and then with stem cells these usually heal. That saves you a lot of cartilage in the future.
Thank you, this is helpful.

I see hip specialists on their site, however drilling plus injections isn't mentioned. I'm not sure microfracture  is normaily performed on a hip.

In my case, the doctor compared MRI's before the injection and about five months after and said that he sees more cartilage in the trochlear groove area where BMAC stem cells with fibrin glue were deposited.
I've heard that MRI isn't accurate in exact assessment of the cartilage condition, so could be just an error of experiment. I do feel less discomfort however, not materially less.

Hoping that dr. Saw's techniques will be finally allowed in US in near future.

Offline Vlad

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You should load bear emediately for the creation of type two collagen. As long as there are no shear forces (like with walking stairs, squads, cycling with high risistence). As time goes by the bruised feeling slowely eases. Thats when you notice that the cartilage forms. But it seems that after 1,5 years your knee really starts to feel normal again.
Healingup, I'll have the surgery procedure with Dr Broyles on Monday. The protocol will be 6 weeks of no bearing (even though I will start physio-therapy 2 days after the procedure).
I wonder why the protocol is different between Dr Saw and Dr Broyles, since the latter is copying the former's procedure & protocol? I have a complex meniscus tear (main issue) and 2 zones with mild arthritis (patella and tibia), so could it be meniscus healing requires 6 weeks of no-bearing?
I wonder if Dr Saw's patients with sutures for meniscus tears follow this protocol as well (6 weeks no-bearing) or they follow the protocol outlined by you above (load bear immediately for the creation of type two collagen). Do you happen to know this?

Thanks.
10/2016 - meniscus tear, mild arthritis right knee

Offline healingup

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You should load bear emediately for the creation of type two collagen. As long as there are no shear forces (like with walking stairs, squads, cycling with high risistence). As time goes by the bruised feeling slowely eases. Thats when you notice that the cartilage forms. But it seems that after 1,5 years your knee really starts to feel normal again.
Healingup, I'll have the surgery procedure with Dr Broyles on Monday. The protocol will be 6 weeks of no bearing (even though I will start physio-therapy 2 days after the procedure).
I wonder why the protocol is different between Dr Saw and Dr Broyles, since the latter is copying the former's procedure & protocol? I have a complex meniscus tear (main issue) and 2 zones with mild arthritis (patella and tibia), so could it be meniscus healing requires 6 weeks of no-bearing?
I wonder if Dr Saw's patients with sutures for meniscus tears follow this protocol as well (6 weeks no-bearing) or they follow the protocol outlined by you above (load bear immediately for the creation of type two collagen). Do you happen to know this?

Thanks.

Depends if the meniscus tear is stable after suturing it. When its stable. E.i. when the two meniscus parts are pressed together when loading then partial weight bearing is needed. When the two parts seperate with loading (which is rare) i can imagine that weight bearing should be postponed. However partial weight bearing is often much better then no weight bearing at all. Often sergeons are insecure and therefore recommend non weight bearing without any good reason.

Offline Bardlas

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Hi Vlad,

I have read your posts and hope you are recovering well! I am in a similar situation (have posted my story in some earlier threads) with my medial meniscus and in the process of making the right decision for myself. I am curious what Dr. Broyles is doing with your meniscus? If nothing is placed would not it negate the whole purpose of regenerating cartilage.

Get well soon and keep us posted.

Bardlas.

Offline Vlad

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I posted the whole story (pre and post op) on this thread: http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEtalk/index.php?topic=67675.0
Please ask there, as to not hijack this thread which is about Dr Saw.
10/2016 - meniscus tear, mild arthritis right knee

Offline Mayou

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Healingup, I am going to answer you here as I am still not allowed to send emails. It took me about 1.5 years before I could do stairs painfree again. 10 months post-op I could do more than you from what I read, but I guess that differs from person to person. Take care

Offline MaximuZ

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Hello everyone, my operation at KLSMC was 15 months ago - lateral side grade 4 kissing lesions, medial plica exision, a bit of drilling on medial trochlea, osteophyte removal and lateral release.
I'm still in the process of recovery, no pain or discomfort after drilling, ROM is -3 and 140. The biggest problem for me is lateral release, i still feel like kneecap is in wrong place and have maltracking problems. I was unable to walk with normal gait for year - had locking there during bending after full extension. And still lateral release site is tight and pulls kneecap down and laterally, now i am able to do elliptical, trademill without limping, but still kneecap tightens up after activities, it is no more tilted but sits more lateral on operated leg after LR than on healthy one and i doubt it will be back to normal position. Also i feel my pelvic and hip stucks in external rotation and painful areas there - i beleive it is direct result of changed knee biomechanics after LR. Cartilage is growing - full thickness on Femur at 10 months and partial on tibia and trochlea. Now can walk small distances up to 1km, but it is still feels weird, also can do upstairs almost normally, downstairs are still not easy but no pain at all. Muscles are getting stronger and stronger cause i do lots of physio at home and in gym : different bed exercices including core and back ones, lots of stretches for lower body, balances on 1 leg, wobble board, loading exercices, bycycle, elliptical, trademill, gonna start walking with nordic sticks in 1-2 months. Situation is improving but very slowly, first year was brutal but not painful, maybe just wrong expectations.
              Mayou, i read all your posts, could you tell some more about your expirience ? When did you stop to ice your knee ? Did you have LR ? What is your activity level now in common life and maybe some sports ? How does your knee react after different activities, do you need to protect it or just feels more like normal ? Thank you in advance )

Offline Mayou

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I don't think I had LR done (at least I can't remember). I don't remember when I stopped icing my knee (it's been 5 years...). I still ice it after strenuous activities like skiing, which I can do again since 3 years. I ski 1-2 day and then I ice it and rest my knee 1 day. I did tear my lateral meniscus again during a fall on the street a couple of months ago, so that needs to be repaired or -hopefully- taken out, because it's quite annoying and sometimes painful, but other than that my knee is in good shape and I can do pretty much everything I want to do (albeit moderately!).

Offline Aly0108

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Thanks a lot for info. I have problem with knee caps, How much is this surgery price? How much many I need to spend for both knees? That surgery is very expensive?

Offline PuneKnee

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Thanks a lot for info. I have problem with knee caps, How much is this surgery price? How much many I need to spend for both knees? That surgery is very expensive?

I read from a 5 year old post that i costs $22000 including procedure + 3-4 stay. Not sure about price now.

Offline RGB

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Probably worth repeating my post from another thread:

"I am a 55 year old male, used to a very high level of activity. I am a former ski instructor, rock climber, windsurfer etc, until my knee gave me trouble. This is the story:

1.  In 1993 I had an ACL repair (patella tendon graft). That was successful and I was very active on the knee for the next 17 years.
2.  In 2010 I was diagnosed with a torn meniscus and a full thickness cartilage lesion in the trochlea. I underwent a partial meniscotomy plus microfracture. Very little guidance on rehab was provided by the surgeon and physio. The outcome was poor.
3.  In 2011, I had an debridement. Photos showed there was a reasonable amount of fibrocartilage in the trochlea lesion but there was a new lesion on the central patella. The debridement made the knee smoother but it was still not up to much activity. I had numerous PRP injections over the next year or so.
4.  In 2012 I had a liposuction derived/concentrated stem cell injection. This had no discernible effect.
5.  In 2013 I was unwise enough to go on a 4 hour steep hike. I knew I couldn't/shouldn't but I was past caring. The knee swelled and a subsequent MRI revealed I'd torn off another piece of cartilage from the trochlea.
6. In 2014 I underwent Dr Saw's stem cell treatment in KL. He's very professional and I had the best of care. I followed the rehab protocol to the letter and, believe me, that's not easy to do for 2 years. The bottom line is that it didn't work for me. The knee ended up with a very impressive level of crepitus and a poor tolerance to activity - perhaps slightly better than before but not significantly. I could do about one flight of stairs per day and I could cycle on the flat for about an hour, or row for about 30 minutes, every second day.
7. In March of this year, I had a patellofemoral replacement (Zimmer). It's early days but it's fantastic. A smooth knee, able to tolerate activity at a level that's been unthinkable for 7-8 years and it's still improving rapidly. My knee will shortly cease to be the centre of my physical universe because I will stop thinking about it all the time. I'll probably stop browsing these discussion pages! Yay. I may well need a full replacement in 10-15 years but that's OK by me. I'll get a high level of activity in the meantime and, to be honest, the recovery from the partial replacement has been easy and pain free."

Update on the patellofemoral replacement. It's doing well. I'm gradually strengthening the joint and it remains smooth and pain free. I went on a 4 hour reasonably hard hike a few days ago with no ill effects. Cycling is good - I can cycle 50-100km per ride comfortably with moderate hills.

Finally, a comment on the costs. I won't comment on the medical costs - I'm sure they vary but you have to factor in getting to KL and back (possibly business class for the return as your knee will be pretty stiff), accommodation, food and transport for the 6 weeks you'll be there iniitally, then return 10 day trips every 6 months for the booster shots.

Offline healingup

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Just a quick update. Now 18 months post op. Descending stairs is going progressively better. After doing my loading exercises i have no pain, without my exercises it is still painfull. But, still 6 months to go, so i am optimistic. A year ago the cartilage was still as soft as toothpaste, so it is hardening out well thus far.

I had a scope done by Dr Williams in London (for something else). He showed me that the cartilage had filled up very nicely (a month ago). I will post a picture in 6 months when I can give my final update.

Offline healingup

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Quick update, now 24 months post op.

Cartilage had grown back as can also be seen on the picture from the scope done at 18 months. The trochlear groove was drilled. At 18 months it was just hard enough to descend stairs. That's probably why you can see the "hairy" strings. Dr Williams who did the scope was impressed by the result though. Trochlea is very hard and w/o stem cells practically impossible to regenerate. Some of my fellow patients that had 60% of their knees drilled do very well medially and laterally but also have the most difficulties still with the trochlea and kneecap.  For me only the initial pain/sensitivity needs to go, then i'm 100% happy.

Timeline:
At 6 months: initial cartilage formation
At 12 months: solid cartilage formation; still soft
Till 12months: not able to descend stairs; cartilage was as soft as toothpaste; I started to do my first dynamic loading exercises; trochlea still painful when loading; deep creeping pain within the bone (that obviously had been drilled as well).
at 18 months: started to be able to descend stairs; painful during first loading, after the fisrt 10 sec almost no pain.
at 21 months: started do do a bit of crossfit. Not too heavy; squads, deadlifts with 2x 20kg + bar, many repetitions. Knee feels good; sometimes sensitive still but in general feels good. Started a little indoor skiing as well.
at 24 months: the trochlea is still sensitive during first loading (for example my first stairs descending after sleeping or after sitting for an extended time). After the first three steps or after 10sec static loading no pain whatsoever.

Dr Saw told me that this sensitivity is also likely to get less once I use the knee more. Lets hope so. It makes sense as everything takes so long to heal (grow back, harden out and remodel). One thing is sure, the more i use the trochlea the less sensitive it is. My other knee (not treated) can sometimes be very painful during a deep squad during crossfit.

Offline exrunner1

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Quick update, now 24 months post op.

Cartilage had grown back as can also be seen on the picture from the scope done at 18 months. The trochlear groove was drilled. At 18 months it was just hard enough to descend stairs. That's probably why you can see the "hairy" strings. Dr Williams who did the scope was impressed by the result though. Trochlea is very hard and w/o stem cells practically impossible to regenerate. Some of my fellow patients that had 60% of their knees drilled do very well medially and laterally but also have the most difficulties still with the trochlea and kneecap.  For me only the initial pain/sensitivity needs to go, then i'm 100% happy.

Timeline:
At 6 months: initial cartilage formation
At 12 months: solid cartilage formation; still soft
Till 12months: not able to descend stairs; cartilage was as soft as toothpaste; I started to do my first dynamic loading exercises; trochlea still painful when loading; deep creeping pain within the bone (that obviously had been drilled as well).
at 18 months: started to be able to descend stairs; painful during first loading, after the fisrt 10 sec almost no pain.
at 21 months: started do do a bit of crossfit. Not too heavy; squads, deadlifts with 2x 20kg + bar, many repetitions. Knee feels good; sometimes sensitive still but in general feels good. Started a little indoor skiing as well.
at 24 months: the trochlea is still sensitive during first loading (for example my first stairs descending after sleeping or after sitting for an extended time). After the first three steps or after 10sec static loading no pain whatsoever.

Dr Saw told me that this sensitivity is also likely to get less once I use the knee more. Lets hope so. It makes sense as everything takes so long to heal (grow back, harden out and remodel). One thing is sure, the more i use the trochlea the less sensitive it is. My other knee (not treated) can sometimes be very painful during a deep squad during crossfit.

Congrats. What activity levels are planning for?

Offline healingup

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Last update. Now 2,5 years after the cartilage procedure with Dr. Saw.

The trochlea (which was regenerated) was fully functional after about 2 years. I have been skiing three times last winter and i am quite an aggressive skier (offpiste) which is hard on the trochlea. A little sensitive after the first holiday, thereafter the reaction to those forces became better and better.

Also, the sensitivity of the cartilage improved still up to 3 years. Now, not so much of an issue anymore.

I would say it healed 100% functionally and about 90% in terms of how it "feels". 100% satisfied. It's really funny how western doctors's ego prevents them from "believing" Dr. Saw. Medical devices companies are all over them...

Wish everyone good luck.


Quick update, now 24 months post op.

Cartilage had grown back as can also be seen on the picture from the scope done at 18 months. The trochlear groove was drilled. At 18 months it was just hard enough to descend stairs. That's probably why you can see the "hairy" strings. Dr Williams who did the scope was impressed by the result though. Trochlea is very hard and w/o stem cells practically impossible to regenerate. Some of my fellow patients that had 60% of their knees drilled do very well medially and laterally but also have the most difficulties still with the trochlea and kneecap.  For me only the initial pain/sensitivity needs to go, then i'm 100% happy.

Timeline:
At 6 months: initial cartilage formation
At 12 months: solid cartilage formation; still soft
Till 12months: not able to descend stairs; cartilage was as soft as toothpaste; I started to do my first dynamic loading exercises; trochlea still painful when loading; deep creeping pain within the bone (that obviously had been drilled as well).
at 18 months: started to be able to descend stairs; painful during first loading, after the fisrt 10 sec almost no pain.
at 21 months: started do do a bit of crossfit. Not too heavy; squads, deadlifts with 2x 20kg + bar, many repetitions. Knee feels good; sometimes sensitive still but in general feels good. Started a little indoor skiing as well.
at 24 months: the trochlea is still sensitive during first loading (for example my first stairs descending after sleeping or after sitting for an extended time). After the first three steps or after 10sec static loading no pain whatsoever.

Dr Saw told me that this sensitivity is also likely to get less once I use the knee more. Lets hope so. It makes sense as everything takes so long to heal (grow back, harden out and remodel). One thing is sure, the more i use the trochlea the less sensitive it is. My other knee (not treated) can sometimes be very painful during a deep squad during crossfit.

Offline RGB

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Lucky you. I admit to being a tiny bit envious! It didn't work for me for whatever reason, despite sticking religiously to the rehab protocol. I had kissing lesions on the trochlea and patella. Ended up with a PFJR which is great. However, I agree that natural cartilage is better if you're lucky enough to regenerate it. Congratulations.