Advertisement - Hide this advert





Author Topic: What has changed in 2 years with Microfracture?  (Read 1211 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline over40knees

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • Liked: 0
What has changed in 2 years with Microfracture?
« on: July 13, 2012, 03:56:48 AM »
I am scheduled to have a microfracture on my left knee in several weeks.  I have had a previous microfracture on my right knee in July 2010.  I was non-weight bearing for almost 8 weeks.fd

I remember all the physical therapy that I did involving heel slides, SLR, spinning, stretching, ect.  What i am curious about is this, has anything changed dramatically in the past 2 years with regards to PT and a microfracture? 

If so, what?

As with the first surgery I'll be non-weight bearing for 6-8 weeks.  Guess I'll start saving a few small coffee cans to do leg raises with.

thank you very much

Offline kneepaincure

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 360
  • Liked: 0
Re: What has changed in 2 years with Microfracture?
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2012, 12:34:40 AM »
I think the surgery still carries a low success rate. You could surf this board and find members who have gone through with it and read about their experiences.
Have had tilted kneecaps for many years, and occasional patellar tendinitis.

Offline momma-cat

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 53
  • Liked: 0
Re: What has changed in 2 years with Microfracture?
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2012, 03:48:14 PM »
I am having a patellar microfracture in less than one week. I have been reading a lot about the surgery, the succes rate vs other types of surgery. The success rate is highly dependent upon the damage done, the activity level of the person and the rehab. The failure rates seem to be associated a lot with non compliance of the patients - whether that be bearing too much weight too soon, not complying with PT recommendations. A CPM is imperative 6 hours a day and non weight bearing for 6-8 weeks with slow and progressive weight bearing for 4 more weeks to allow that clot to form cartilage. It is not a permanant fix. It is used to get a person through until, basically, they are old enough to have a TKR. As for mine, I am also have an osteotomy at the same time. After this surgery will be a TKR but I am only 40 and my family lives well into their 90's so I want to put off the TKR as long as possible.
Good luck with yours!!!!
Cat
Catherine H.
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Offline over40knees

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • Liked: 0
Re: What has changed in 2 years with Microfracture?
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2012, 01:46:44 AM »
Thank you very much for the replies.  I have had good success with the first microfracture.  What concerns me about the location of this defect in the left knee is it is an area where there is more pressure and contact with the knee cap.

I've already started to work in some therapy exercises.

Offline kneesurgeonvictim

  • MINIgeek (20-50 posts)
  • **
  • Posts: 28
  • Liked: 0
Re: What has changed in 2 years with Microfracture?
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2012, 12:10:57 AM »
Although I did not have microfracture, it was one of the options advised to me when I saw a knee consultant about a cartilage defect under my knee cap, together with MACI and and I actually had the first stage cartilage harvest in preparation for a MACI 2nd stage operation which in the event did not proceed. I was left with a horrendous pain that I thought heralded crippledom. Even the surgeon who performed the 1st stage MACI wrote to my GP saying I would probably need another operation to relieve the pain.

Yet tonight I played sport as if I never had any pain whatsoever. I found two brilliant consultants Mr Bickerstaff and Mr R. Thomas who whilst acknowledging the cartilage defect would not go away, suggested that I should try physio before considering another operation. The physio who helped me understand the functions of the muscles in the knee and role of muscle support in reducing pain devised a progressive programme which over some considerable time period has led to restoration of almost full knee function.

I am in awe of what a good physio can achieve to help relieve knee pain of how the body can heal itself and just how significant muscle strength is in reducing knee pain. I have recently been in an advanced NHS physio class, and the benefit that has brought to knee function is amazing. I will be eternally grateful to the knee consultants who sacrificed potential income and were wise enough to advise me that physio should be the first course of action and to my amazing physio, Claire R. and latterly the NHS for rescuing me from my hitherto pain wracked immobile state.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2012, 12:14:26 AM by kneesurgeonvictim »