Advertisement - Hide this advert





Author Topic: iontophoresis for patellar tendinosis  (Read 1351 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ALRunner

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 78
  • Liked: 1
iontophoresis for patellar tendinosis
« on: June 06, 2012, 07:07:54 PM »
Me again. Still got my patellar tendinosis, now almost 7 years old. Tried a bunch of non-invasive things over the years, the main thing that helps appears very light activity including strengthening, but mainly doing nothing.

I'm seeing a new PT now who wants to try iontophoresis with dexamethazone. I know, and my referring doc has said also, that cortizone is not often a great idea for the patella as it can encourage rupturing. Dexa is a steroid. I wonder if it will do the same thing? He did not mention acetic acid, even though that's what's been studied (somewhat) in calcific tendinitis--and I do have a calcified lump/scar tissue on my tendon.

I've googled a bunch of stuff and there's little evidence iontophoresis is good long term. It may have some short-term benefits. Frankly, I'm not even sure my insurance will cover it anyway due to lack of efficacy.

Offline kneepaincure

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 360
  • Liked: 0
Re: iontophoresis for patellar tendinosis
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2012, 12:29:21 AM »
Sounds like a really confusing situation. Have you asked your PT about the rupture risk?
Have had tilted kneecaps for many years, and occasional patellar tendinitis.

Offline ALRunner

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 78
  • Liked: 1
Re: iontophoresis for patellar tendinosis
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2012, 02:00:06 PM »
Sounds like a really confusing situation. Have you asked your PT about the rupture risk?
Yep but he said it's safe. It may be...I read more yesterday on ruptures of tendons with steroid injections and the risk appears elevated when the tendon itself is injected via needle; injecting around the tendon is much safer. iontophoresis is not injecting at all (with a needle), so probably is quite safe.

In any case, I've decided for now I will not do it. I have reviewed all the studies about it and there is simply not a compelling case for it. This is echoed in a massive journal article I read yesterday, which a couple of MDs put together after reviewing 177 articles on resolving tendinopathy. Not much of a reason to do iontophoresis, and if a person does do it for calcific tendinitis, it should be with acetic acid, not with dexamethasone, from what it looks like.

BTW saving people maybe a TON of time/effort, here are the two most important links on treating tendinopathy I've found, should anybody come upon this particular thread at some point in the future:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2505250/
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2971642/















support