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Author Topic: temp regulation in operated leg  (Read 709 times)

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Offline anasf

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temp regulation in operated leg
« on: November 07, 2011, 05:25:48 PM »
Hi there

I had a relatively minor op to my right knee a year and a half ago. I've struggled generally with recovery though I'm now making some progress :) (unfortunatley still have to have a second op next year). One issue that persists is that since the op, my right leg, from the knee down, struggles to regulate temperature and is consistently colder than the left. My circulation has been checked and that's fine so the best guesses seem to be that there was some nerve damage caused when I had the op there is a sympathetic nerve issue (I had crps for a while but under control now).
Anyone had the same and any other ideas I might be able to follow up on?

Many thanks
Ana

Offline Miss Beams

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Re: temp regulation in operated leg
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2011, 09:05:49 PM »
hi, just wanted to say,you are not alone, i had a scope 10months ago, still struggling with pain issues and i to have one knee cooler than the other with a burning sensation and stinging across the potals when lightly touched. I havent had an answer to what it is, i hope someone will come up with the answer.
06/10  L knee trauma(horseriding accident) MCL
10/10 MRI ACL/MCL/G4CM/PF
12.01.2011 scope ACL intact, chronoplasty and 2 x microfractures FMC and trochlear ,MRI over reported(knee not as bad as made out),   time and patience will tell:)

Offline Jond

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Re: temp regulation in operated leg
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2011, 09:20:15 PM »
My operated leg is warmer

Can I ask how you succeeded to deal with CRPS ?

Offline anasf

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Re: temp regulation in operated leg
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2011, 10:04:25 PM »
Hi

Re the crps - a couple of things really helped when the medics realised crps was going on. One was capsaicin cream which took away an immediate layer of pain (it was useful for about 6 weeks) - given by one pain specialist - & then a rather unusual method that the orthopaedic consultant went for when I saw him a month after the pain specialist  was to wear a full leg brace at night (this was mainly because I was still complaining bitterly that night time was horrible and I was generally in more pain at night and my knee was on fire in the mornings). As you probably know, keeping a crps effected limb imbolised is not what the pain specialists or physios advocate. However it has, I feel, turned out to be a gem of an idea. For the first time in months when I took off the leg splint after it's first use, not only had I had a pretty low pain night but my right knee for the first time in months looked liked the left knee! My partner & I both stared in disbelieve at my knee! (about 3 days after I started using the splint I also started on gabapentin) As the orthopod said, the leg simply wasn't getting to heal at night.

The down side was that due to the OA side of things having had the leg immoblised overnight I could barely stand on the leg in the morning and spent the rest of the day in that state. My mobility wasn't great at that point anyway so it wasn't like I'd gone from no crutches and active to barely moving, overnight. I continued to use the splint for about a month slowly letting a bit of bend into it and then by day I had to work on regaining mobility, I was off work at the time so it didn't cause any major life upsets in that respect.
About 4 weeks after using the splint I saw a different pain specialist, he told me to stop using the splint, changed my medication to pregabalin and referred me to a physio with experience of crps. The physio was excellent and helped me claw back lost mobility which took another month to get to an ok functional level and we've continued to work on leg strength and I haven't had any flare ups of the crps. Muscle seems to be refusing to build & have leg temp issues but the crps is no longer eating me up alive!

Although it was alarming just how difficult it was in the first few mornings to stand and although it set me back for a bit in terms of mobility which I had spent a few months trying to get better at - I'd use a leg splint again. I am now in the least pain I've been for about 12 months. Ok I'm still on pregabalin and tramodol but next week's appt with the pain specialist we're going to discuss coming off them to see what happens. (I've already been able to reduce the tramodol)

I did also have a Bowen treatment around the time of the splint, I think that might have helped as well along with other things. That first morning though of taking off the leg splint, knee the same colour as the other :-)

Hope that helps
Ana

Offline Lottiefox

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Re: temp regulation in operated leg
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2011, 10:23:27 PM »
As someone dealing with CRPS in my big toe and 3 other toes following foot surgery in April I would say that the colder leg is still evidence that the CRPS reaction is taking place. As you probably know, its very much a case of beating it down and hoping it goes into remission rather than it vanishing. I am still on Pregabelin and take one tramadol at night. My pain is largely controlled and I am very active although too much walking sets off the pain. My symptoms seem to relate to my body temperature - if I get too hot (hot room rather than hot through working out at the gym which I do 5 times a week!) my foot flares up. The colder temperature tends to reflect the dysfunctional autonomic nerve responses. Please let us know how you get on with reducing the Pregabelin - my plan is to do so next january after my next pain appt.

Interesting about the Bowen treatment. I have considered that. I am about to start some reflexology - I had a mini trial run on my foot and it didn't go mental and I hope it might improve blood flow and so on. I also looked into oxygen therapy - you can get it through the MS charity in the UK but they've been very slow in getting back to me and when they did you need upwards of 20 sessions - not cheap and also very time consuming. I am sticking with my current regime and hopefully I too will carry on seeing a reduction in pain.

Thanks for sharing your story. It is good to read of positive progress with CRPS. There is a lot of doom and gloom associated with it and boy when its bad it does grind you down. But being down makes it even worse so thank you for helping us stay upbeat,

good luck with your next appointment,

Lottie x
Bilateral patella OA since 2009, no surgeries.
Euflexxa working well x3 to current
Right forefoot CRPS post fusion surgery 2011
Refusing to let the ailing parts stop me....