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Author Topic: donor knee(s)  (Read 1896 times)

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Offline ausforce

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donor knee(s)
« on: August 11, 2011, 07:01:09 PM »
Has anybody out there ever seen or heard of donor knees, if so could you replace your (replacement) knee with a donor knee... I maybe wishing to much but got to be better than having it cut off..

Offline subwayknees

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Re: donor knee(s)
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2011, 08:02:25 PM »
Just googled it got no response, don' think knee transplants are being done at all.  Regarding amputation I fully understand the option and have looked into it I will give you the email for a gentleman in South Carolina, USA.  His name is Richard Blalock  his email which he has allowed me  to give out is [email protected]  Richard has a large web site, I fouigot it but he can give it to you, that deals with the idea of elective amputation for pain relief.  I have exchanged emails with him very frequently.  He is a competitive runner who suffered a life altering accident.  His pain was so bad he could not walk.  He tried everything and finally opted for amputation.  In his case it was a lower leg injury so the amputation was below the knee.
He is very open and on his web site which I will get you if needed but an email to him should get a reply in a few days, he blogs about the pain he suffered and all the doctors and failed surgeries he went through before deciding on amputation for pain relief.  Today with several high tech prosthetiics he is running marathon races again.  He is very supportive unlike many doctors about the idea of amputation as a means to GET YOUR LIFE BACK AGAIN.  In my case I wanted to see Dr Windsor and take one final shot at salvage before I go that route, but as I discussed with Richard, even if I could not walk well after the amputation, if I could get off morphine and stop the pain which keeps be basically in my room 5 out of 7 day's a week that would be fine with me.  With my power wheelchair and scooter which I use most of the time I can get around with little or no difficulty.  I cannot walk now and am in chronic debilitating pain so I would be better off not walking and NOT having the pain.  We spoke about the matter of phantom pain and apparently the pain doctors can manage that issue very well with simple spinal injections into the nerves that cause the pain.

I even went to see his surgeon as several I have spoken to would not consider amputation simply for pain relief.  (Afraid of law suites)  However there are an equal number of surgeons who are willing to consider the option.  In my case if Dr. Windsor feels I stand a "decent" better than 50% chance of getting a major reduction in pain, I will allow him to try a revision and total reconstruction with ligament allograft.  Actually two surgeries in one, a big job.  If not I see no need to go through the painful recovery of a major surgery only to face amputation later.  Thus far my surgeons at Hopkins, Univ. of Pittubrgh, and NIH seem to feel the source of my pain is such that even a successful reconstruction would not stop the pain, I would have a more stable knee with the same pain level.  However in my calls and research I found that Dr. Wilson and others at The Hospital For Special Surgery will perform peripheral nerve surgery at the time of revision, that part done by a plastic surgeon, where specific nerves that transmit some of the pain impulses are removed.  It is a very new procedure done more in Eurpoe thn the United States.  So aside from having an evening at The Metropolitan Opera I will also be talking to Dr. Windsor about what he feels my chances are in gaining pain relief from his procedure.  I do not expect 100% relief, I am realistic and know that with the amount of scar tissue and nerve damage I have that is not realisic but if he fees i stand a good chance at even a 50% reduiction in pain I may tell him to schedule the surgery and give it his best shot.  I have really heard they have done sone exceptional special work at The Hospital for Special Surgery.  I will try to locate richards web site address but suggest you email him if you are even considering amputation as and end of the line option. From his point of view and mine while it does not sound very appealing it may just give a much better quality of life especially with the new high tech prosthetic legs being developed.  Good luck

Offline subwayknees

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Re: donor knee(s)
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2011, 08:10:45 PM »
Richards web site can be reached directly by entering on google the following (IIAGDRT.blogspot.com) it is worth looking at

Offline ausforce

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Re: donor knee(s)
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2011, 08:28:14 PM »
Thanks,
 You have supplied me more information than I could have hoped for, I hope you get the results your looking for... I know the pain can be very bad and sometimes you just don't want to do anything sometimes. I own a small farm with sheep and at time I can't walk the 300 meters to the end of one fence and to walk to the other field , forget it. Let me know how it turns out. I see my Professor next week.
Baz

Offline subwayknees

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Re: donor knee(s)
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2011, 09:07:59 PM »
For fifteen plus years while working as a correspondent in Wshington D.C. I owned a 70 acre sheep farm.  We had specialized in Jacob sheep for the local wool pool and then corriedale sheep, so I know just physically demanding sheep can be, especically in lambing season.  As my leg began to get worse, we would hold back breeding to have lambing season begin in April once it got warmer outside than the usual Late February season.  Actually we had less losses from sheep lambing in sub freezing temperature.  Those day are long behind me but I will never forget cutting back sheep hoofs and pouring coppertox on them, I dont think I could last five minutes on a sheep farm any longer.  We had about 200 ewes going into each lambing season.  Keep me posted on your progress and I encourage you to check out the NY Hospital and the web site Richard has.  Good luck

Offline ausforce

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Re: donor knee(s)
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2011, 06:13:25 PM »
I spoke to my professor today, do you know the name of the doctor who will do the peripheral nerve surgery? is it Wilson or Windsor who will treat your knee, as my doctor knows Dr Wilson..

Offline subwayknees

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Re: donor knee(s)
« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2011, 10:06:19 PM »
The orthopedic surgeon is Dr. Russell WINDSOR, if you simply google (Dr. Russell Windsor HSS) it will bring up his bio, below it is a link to over 50 published papers he has presented, I also know he was a past president of The Knee Society. As far as the nerve surgery I had looked inot that about six months ago after hearing about it at John Hopkins.  At that time there were only about three of four plastic surgeons in the U>S> that did the surgery, which was pionereed in (Dubai, UAE)  There was one internatinally known plastic surgeon in Baltimore who has a large web site and has clinics i Hollywood, Miami, Baltimore and overseas.  He personally travels the world and does the surgery where he removes the nerves directly from the knee area, promising a pain free existance.  Two problems were brought to my attention by other docs, first without nerves being totally pain free can be a danger as some pain is necessary for you body to warn you about infection, trauma etc.  Also while you would be mostly pain free the surgery does not address the underlying issue at all, it does not touth the prothesis or knee at all so if the leg is unstable before the procedure it will be that way after.  The other issue was cost and this becae a warning redl light to me.  Out of the four doctors I found whop do the surgery NONE accepts any insurance, and most insurance will not reimburse the patient for the procedure which has a total cost of over $25,000 u.s. dollars.  In fact two of the doctors I called charged $1200.00 up front cash to even make an office consult.  The wole thing sounds a little strange to me and I have a lot of knowledge of standard US Medical practice.  It is my understanding that The HSS does have a plastic surgeon on staff that will do a partial nerve removal, but not as radical or total as these other plastic surgeons.  I will sign off and get back to you with the web site of the doctor who develped the procedure.  It is one of the most slick web sites I have ever seen, and it may in fact help the pain but it does nothing at all to deal with th causes and left unattended the leg could totally breakdown and not support yopu and you would not know what was coming until it was too late.  I will be back soon with the web site for the plastic surgeon, but if you consider it, I hope you are ready to spend a lot of money for something very new.  Be right back

Offline subwayknees

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Re: donor knee(s)
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2011, 10:17:29 PM »
The web site can be found by entering the following on google (Dellion Institute for Peripherial Nerve Surgery)  I have put them on the back of my list, I fugure if it is such a cure all some top University Medical Centers that take standard insurance will soon be doing it, I m a bit suspect that it  only a small group of very young plastic surgeons.  I noticed a few more sites when I just checked it now but they all sem to be small private clinics.  I would be interested to know what your first opinion is,  I have seen too many offers to relieve chronic pain that ask for big upfront dollars and offer little.  Lets face it many people would sell their souls to be rid of pain and I guess I can't figure out why the big teaching hospitals are not doing this procedure anywhere in the US, and I have called the top ten, and none of them from Hopkins, to Mayo Clinic etc have doctors on staff that do this procedure,  I have not gotten a valid reason, you would think top docs would jump on this if were really totally safe from an overall medical view?















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