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Author Topic: About to have Femoral derotation osteotomy and have lots of unanswered questions  (Read 1359 times)

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Hannah4tnvols

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I am having my left femur derotated next Wednesday June 1 and also having some ligagments in my knee repaired. I am nervous about the derotation. No ideas what to expect. Is there lots of pain post op? How extensive is rehab? How long before I am pretty much back to regular life? Is a brace involved? Because I am having this surgery I have had to move my wedding date and am unable to go back to college this fall. Major bummer. Any kind of advice or personal experience stories would help!

Offline crankerchick

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Hi there.

You are definitely in the right place to get some folks to share on their experience with this surgery. I had femoral and tibial derotation osteotomy along with a TTT back in Oct of 2009 and I have to say, so far it has been a great decision.

Pain is really subjective and it's different for everyone and I think even depends on your surgeon, post-op care team, and pain management team. I can only speak for myself and say yes it hurts, but my pain was never out of control after my surgery. I had meds every four hours to stay in front of the pain, but really think they didn't do much for me, I just didn't want to not take them and find out they were helping.

I was partial weight bearing with crutches for about 6 weeks, although the weight restriction was decreased after 4 weeks. After that, I was allowed full weight bearing as tolerated and went back to work. I would say for me, the first week was obviously the worst, the second week better, and by the third week good enough that I would have returned to work if I absolutely had to. Thankfully, I did not have to. Crutching around at work would have been awful, not to mention there was still enough pain, discomfort, and lack of mobility at that point that work would have been the suck.

How extensive the rehab is really also depends on your surgeon's protocol and your own determination and what activities you want to get back to. My physical therapist wasn't very aggressive compared to me or my surgeon, so I ended up ditching the PT (after too long trying to duke it out) and went with a personal trainer instead. This kicked my rehab into overdrive. I put in a lot of time, but also got a lot of reward out of it. My leg isn't 100% but I can do anything I want whenever I want, including sports, mountain biking, whatever. Different people have differing activity levels, so "regular life" is different for different people. I would say, it took about 3 months to get back to "regular life" like day to day function, but longer for sports with any degree of competitiveness and agility.

There are some post op diaries you can check out on here as well. A few are active right now. It's been a while since my surgery, buy you can check out my diary as well.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2011, 06:38:52 PM by crankerchick »
Mar '07 - plica excision
Oct '09 - femoral + tibial derotational osteotomy & TTT
Aug '10 - hardware removal
"You control your leg. Don't let it control you." -Smart trainer
"Get your a$$ in gear and go for it! Nothing will happen until you make it!" -Smart doctor

Offline schinz

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Cranker....we spoke a while back about my 12 year old daughter and there were a couple things I could not remember.  How old were you when you had the surgery in Oct. 2009?  Didn't you have to have the other leg done too or is my memory that bad?  If so, have you had the other one done?  If not why not?  Also, how long did the doctor tell you it would take your leg to be back to 100%?  Did you not believe by that after over a year and a half later it would be back to 100%?  Can you run and do ANY sport you wanted to do right now?  How does your leg compare now on a 1-10 scale to what it was before with regards to stabilty, function and pain?

Wow....those questions fired into my mind and onto the screen so fast I didn't realize how many I asked!!!  Sorry if I sounded abrupt, but I wanted to ask as much as I could from someone who has actually experienced all this!!
Thanks
Rick

Offline crankerchick

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I was 28 when I had my derotational surgery. I had my left leg done. I have the increased rotation on the femur and tibia as well as patella alta on the right leg too, but have not had surgery to correct that leg. The left leg has always been worse as far as instability goes, and I'm just living with the right leg as it is for now and hoping it doesn't get any worse. Lately, I've been seriously questioning that decision, but so it goes for now. It's not some bad memory or bad surgery experience keeping me from doing it so much as I just don't want to do any more surgery or have my life on hold from the things I want to do. When I made that decision, my right leg wasn't really getting in the way of anything I wanted to do. At that time, it was only painful, but no instability.

My doctor didn't give me a real "time frame" to be back to 100%, although I never really asked either. Of all the questions I asked, and I asked many, that just wasn't one. I knew I would do everything he said to do, and beyond that, I wasn't so concerned with the when, only that it would happen. He told me that I would be able to do all my activities again, just like I used to, except without pain or instability as soon as I felt comfortable to do them, and that was good enough for me. I knew how long I would be non-weightbearing and I knew that after that, I would be allowed to do whatever I wanted. How long it takes to get back to full activities and be good at them really depends on each person and what activities they want to get back to and how much work they are willing to put in.

I believed for sure that in a year I would be back to my previous activities and at the level I was at when I could no longer do them anymore. Yes I can run and jump and do ANY sport I want. I'll be honest, some things still don't feel quite normal, but there is nothing I can't do no matter if it involves running, jump, squatting, crawling, or whatever. Sports that I haven't played in over a decade now to keep from being in pain I now play whenever I want and my surgery leg does not stop me. It's been a long haul, but I'm plenty satisfied with where I am now and won't hesitate to do the surgery on my other leg if I feel like it has progressed to the point that it is stopping me from doing the things I want to do.

Your daughter is a lot younger than me obviously, plus every recovery is different. I've seen the gamut from kids putting down the crutches as soon as the doctor says they can to people being on crutches or a cane for far longer than I was. It really just depends.

As far as numbers go, my knee pain is non-existent. My instability is non-existent. So with regards to pre-surgery, all of that stuff is whatever end of the 1-10 scale means gone. As far as function, as far as immediately before the surgery--function was limited. There was no running or sports. Just walking was a challenge. As far as in general, I would give myself an 8. I can almost do my sports and activities as well as I ever did, but not quite all the way there yet. The trade-off though, is that I can do them without hurting for days afterwards, which is what I dealt with until I just stopped being active in my early twenties. The difference between now and prior to surgery is now I believe I can do what I want and I'm confident to do them, whereas before I pretty much passed up on things. Maybe I can't do some things as well as I ever could yet, but at least I can do them and I do actually do them and I do them with confidence. Doing is still 100% improvement over not doing. It doesn't matter how well I could do something before if I wasn't confident to actually do it, either because of pain or instability.

Hope that helps.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2011, 12:27:31 AM by crankerchick »
Mar '07 - plica excision
Oct '09 - femoral + tibial derotational osteotomy & TTT
Aug '10 - hardware removal
"You control your leg. Don't let it control you." -Smart trainer
"Get your a$$ in gear and go for it! Nothing will happen until you make it!" -Smart doctor

Offline schinz

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Yes...it does...THANKS SOOO Much!!!

Hannah4tnvols

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I had my surgery. So far I've just dealt with pain in my hip. They have left a femoral block in that had had my knee numbed since surgery. This will be removed tomorrow. I am hoping the pain isn't too bad. Thanks for all of the encouragement! Night time is the worse for pain plus I hate sleeping on my back, but I'm adjusting!















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