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Author Topic: To scooter or not to scooter?  (Read 13253 times)

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Offline knee always hurts

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #30 on: October 10, 2010, 09:05:51 PM »
Well, this is a little embarrassing. My goodness, I am cheap. Well, anyway, I was about to purchase the bike you mentioned. I had found it cheaper on Amazon.com, but then noticed another bike that was even cheaper! So I went for that one. Here:

http://www.amazon.com/Drive-Medical-Exerciser-Attractive-Silver/dp/B002VWK09Q/ref=sr_1_1?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid=1286740793&sr=1-1

I'm hoping this will do what I need it to do. As long as it does that, I'm golden. And I got nice, hardcover history book with the savings from getting the El Cheapo model (as if the other one wasn't).

Offline SqshPlr8

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #31 on: October 11, 2010, 05:18:34 AM »
Thanks for the super El Cheapo link!  I should be ordering one (maybe two: one for home, one for the lab) soon!

I've been doing the foam-roller jig in the apartment during the day, but go to the gym to preserve some sanity.  But I think the pedal-exerciser will do a better job.  If that doesn't work, I am in the process of making a crude passive motion machine.  Think duct tape plus remote control cars. 

This patellofemoral conundrum is an interesting one: How does a Schrodinger world respond to Newtonian insults? And what if Schrodinger is really, really, really pissy? Although I find "translational research" an overused, bloated term, I think that if there ever was a field that desperately needed a "bench to bedside" approach it would have to be the one in which the knee resides.  Perhaps a career in mechanobiology is in the works! 



Offline knee always hurts

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #32 on: October 11, 2010, 06:15:32 PM »
I think the quantum world view would respond to Newtonian derision in much the same fashion as humans have always dealt with their ideological opponents. Perhaps with a "My God is bigger and better than your God." Or the more grade schoolish: "My Dad is bigger and smarter than your Dad." The adherent of the quantum view would suggest to Newtonian physicist that he wouldn't exist without the quantum God. After all, were it not for the random perturbations of fundamental particles in the early universe, the universe might have perfectly evenly expanded into an ever cooling uniformity, lacking all differentiation. The nearly even cooling of the Cosmic Microwave Backround Radiation certainly establishes the Big Bang model of cosmology, but those minor differences confirm that the layout of the universe as we know it derives from those earliest nanoseconds. And of course this led to stars, which led to planets, which led to life, and then finally humans, with their attendant nervous systems and knees, placing me and you in a whole lot of pain.

But perhaps not so much as if we irritated Mr. Schrödinger, which my imagination tells me would have the result of us being placed in a steel encasement connected to a Geiger counter. I don't know about you, but I don't want to think about what he'd see when he decided to "observe" us.

I'm in full agreement with the translational research comment. There is quite a good deal of high quality research that is being conducted on a regular basis by the medical community, but good luck seeing that translate into better care for the patient. I've written about that on the "My Success Story..." thread. Unfortunately for the patient, there is a lot more money to be made by surgeons and physical therapists by doing surgery and physical therapy and keeping the patient in the dark than by giving the patient information that might actually be relevant to their condition. Nothing more threatens the establishment than a disturbance in the inegalitarian relationship between professional and patient, which this access to information results in. Think of the midichlorians of a Dark Lord of the Sith responding to the presence of a Jedi, and you've got the idea.

You've got to be kidding me! You are making a passive motion machine? I'm trying to envision those remote control cars in my mind, but coming up blank. I guess I'm not so creative. Maybe they are going in a circular motion on a track which extends and flexes the knees? What do you do with the duct tape? You'll have to tell me how it goes.

You know, I think we have the makings on this forum of a revolutionary new approach to knee rehab! We could start a new biotech company. What do you think?

knee always hurts - CEO (Now calm down, I thought of the idea so I get to be CEO) and evil mastermind
SqshPlr8 - CTO and resident engineering guru (We'll get that motion machine onto the market)
rbcyclist - CFO (Duh, he is a financial journalist) and lead therapist
highroller - CCO (Chief Crocodile Officer) After all, and as well all know, every Australian is an expert in crocodile training. And what do you do with a whiny patient who doesn't respond to treatment? He can be honorary poet laureate as well if he likes.

Darn! I've got to remember, "Brevity is the soul of wit." Well I better stop typing now. Keep me updated on your condition and how the El Cheapo thingie goes for you.

Offline SqshPlr8

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #33 on: October 14, 2010, 02:22:17 AM »
Let's cash-in infomercial-style!  We need to convince the audience that they desperately need to purchase a crude, cheap passive motion machine ("Just, only 13 12 simple, easy payments of $59.95!") that can only be ordered off the TV between the hours of 2:30 - 4:30 AM!  We just gotta get a catchy name -- like Sham-Wow, but, like, for knees. Knees-Now? Knee-No-Ow! [Something followed by an exclamation point]!  Let's get this thing cooking!

(I have seen a passive motion machine for the back on TV at 4am [http://www.hammacher.com/Product/79124?source=FROOGLE], so maybe we should be taking this more seriously!)

Offline knee always hurts

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #34 on: October 14, 2010, 10:33:23 PM »
Knee-No-Ow? I suppose if you're marketing to cavemen. Although it worked for Geico. You might be on to something here.

While what I had in mind for the business was something a bit more durable, the shady world of late night infomercials might be the best route for a duct tape and remote car passive motion amalgamation machine. Given the unfortunate passing of Billy Mays, will Anthony Sullivan do? He'll be given an unkempt beard and caveman drag. I think the contrast with the accent and voice will be a real winner.

At least all financial worries will be over. Hey, if people can make a living with El Cheapo bike floor thingies, you just never know. By the way, the ECBFT will be delivered on Tuesday. Maybe this will finally be something I can tolerate? Only time will tell.

Offline SqshPlr8

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #35 on: October 15, 2010, 08:05:53 PM »
Yea, I figure sleaze sells.  Sullivan is a great choice. His accent will undoubtedly add a certain credibility (or incredibility!) to the product.

Kidding aside, I hope the bike helps you out -- I think mine comes next week or the week thereafter. Let's see how it goes.

Best of luck.

Offline knee always hurts

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #36 on: October 16, 2010, 09:51:07 PM »
Let not hilarity be set aside just yet. ECBFT arrives! Yep, three days early. The look of surprise on my face when the Post Man was coming up with that package. I knew what it was right away. Assembly was quick and painless. A few thoughts on the thingie (I could call it a widget, but thingie somehow seems more fitting.) itself:

It is cheap. You're getting your money's worth, though. Expect to have to place it against a wall or object, or otherwise immobilize it, because it's not going to stay put otherwise. And it does wobble a bit in operation. But it does what it needs to, and takes my knees from full extension through 90 degrees of flexion. Not bad.

Only time will tell if it will work. My left knee, the one with the probable chondromalacia, seems to tolerate it pretty well. But the right knee, which is likely irritated before I even jump on, or whatever it is you do with this thingie, is another matter. Through experimentation, I've discovered just how low a level of tolerance my knee really has. I think I've already exceeded my envelope of function hobbling to the bathroom in the morning. This is going to be a literal nightmare figuring out a range of acceptable motion, if it's possible at all. But I'm committed to trying everything before giving up. If all fails in the end, it's back to the doctor's with me. But that's a while away yet. For now, ECBFT is my new best friend.  8)

Offline SqshPlr8

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #37 on: October 20, 2010, 09:58:49 PM »
Just got the ECBFT today.  We'll see how it goes!

Has the ECBFT helped you out -- or at least not hurt you -- at all?   

In the meantime, I've gone to the pool. With a pool buoy between my legs, I alternate between no kicks and very gentle kicks (from ~ 120 - 170 degrees of flexion), and have yet to experience "catching" or pain in general, sensations that I would get occasionally on the bike.  I like this swimming thing because I can easily adjust my range motion and gravity is no longer a factor.   Even better, for the first time in a month I've woken up without that nauseating feeling of silicone implants pressing on the backs of my kneecaps! We'll see how long this lasts...

During the summer I was swimming, which seemed to make things much better -- than much worse.  Of course, I was swimming as a cross-training regimen, and therefore was really trying to exert myself.  After all, my knees weren't THAT bad... Now, I barely get my heart rate above 90 bpm for 1 hr (4 min on/2 min floating).  When not in the pool, I'm keeping at it with the foam roller jig, but swimming seems to be a big relief. 

I know a Waterworld existence is not ideal, but maybe try out the pool?   

Offline knee always hurts

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #38 on: October 20, 2010, 11:21:44 PM »
Everybody ought to have an ECBFT. For that price, it would be worth it as a decorative piece alone!  :P

Now, as to whether it's done a pair of knees any good. Well, I can't say I've responded negatively to it. But since the most limited amount of walking imaginable seems to irritate my knees (or at least the right one), by the time I even get to using the ECBFT, it's already beyond hope. Or at least it seems to be that way. I felt like I had managed the pain fairly well over the last few days, although I can't say that I sensed any improvement. Then, this morning, I actually felt pretty good upon waking up. Even so, I didn't do anything differently than normal. All of the sudden this vicious, lancinating pain shot through my knee. As if that wasn't bad enough, the pains kept shooting sporadically for several hours after I sat down. It's calmed down now, but any chance that I was making progress has certainly evaporated at this point. What's remarkable is just how little I did. I really can't do any less within practical limits.

I am thinking of trying taping, although reviewing your previous posts, I can see that you won't be able to offer any encouragement there. I suppose it's worth trying everything, as every case is different.

It's funny (OK, none of this is actually funny) how I could've written your first post. Everything from the

"The most annoying thing, however, is everyday activities.  Walking anymore than 100m aggravates my knees.  I can characterize the pain as a din of discomfort punctuated by specific, spear-like sensations behind and below my patellae. Sitting for long periods of time sucks, too."

to the bit about rheumatoid arthritis and Lyme disease (I actually requested these myself!)

all the way to the 26 y, M.

My pain tends more towards the lateral side of the knees, though. I think you have it more medially? But it's the same darn thing, isn't it? Why does the patellofemoral joint get itself into these predicaments? Darned gravity. I'll confess that I'm starting to become a bit batty. I barely even leave the house anymore. When is this going to end? Nobody can give me an answer. I wonder if there are people out there who eventually realize that they'll never recover, and just decide to go about their lives anyway. I guess the pain is generally not debilitating. But it is a miserable experience to walk. I know this is a bit off in the distance, but if you don't make progress with conservative measures, and lets just say that removing that inflamed plica doesn't work, what is the next option? Is a PFJR something to consider, or should one just live with the pain? I think psychologically, it might be a relief to stop continuously thinking about rehabbing my knees, but on the other hand, I don't think I'd find much pleasure in doing what I used to enjoy. I'm not ready to give up just yet, but how much longer can this be maintained?

If I had access to a swimming pool, that would be a different matter. You and highroller. Jeez. He has a little jacuzzi thing to kick around in, and you've got a pool. Luxury for PFPS sufferers. Where is the pool, anyway? Even if I could get access to one, I'm not sure how much it would help as just walking to it would probably spell the end of my knee health for the day.

On second thought, my knees don't feel much like yours. Silicone implants? I don't even want to know.  :o

I'll probably end up getting that tape, but I can't say that I have much reason to believe that it's going to help. After that, I'll probably be making another appointment to the doctor. There may be something there that will turn up on a scan and they'll be able to treat it. But with anterior knee pain, the story is seldom that simple. We'll see. I hope that swimming regimen works for you.  :)

Offline SqshPlr8

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #39 on: October 21, 2010, 02:46:38 AM »
May I recommend nihilism?

I'll share.

A few weeks ago I was absolutely miserable.  I couldn't find any comfortable position.  The knees were constantly angry regardless of what I did or did not do.  On top of that, my wrists were so sore (because of the stairs) I couldn't type or write.  Dejected, I just said, "Screw it," and walked to the museum, which is about .5 miles away, in my pajamas.  I didn't care anymore.  I had spent an obscene sum living in a hotel, withdrew from my friends and family, and what did I have to show for it?  Two angry knees, two angry wrists, and just friggin' angry in general.

At first, my walk to the museum was, as expected, awful.   The pain was not debilitating, but it was, as you say, miserable.  My knees were full of fireworks and it was July 4th.  I think I muttered some lines from the 1976 movie Network, but with a patella slant.  I also imagined myself as Walter from Big Lebowski when he confronts the German Nihilists, expect instead of being German, my enemies were material representations of PFPS.   

Incidentally, I came upon a German-American Day parade, which made me giggle, as the mere sight of lederhosen makes me giggle.  I somehow forgot about my knees, continued walking, and made it into the museum.  I sat in the atrium making a lame attempt to write down things I needed to take care of: moving out of my apartment, leaving my job, reconsidering career options etc.  Unfortunately, my right hand was shot, so I switched to my left hand.  That hand was shot, so I double-fisted the pencil and block-lettered my To-Do list.  Guilty of my self-pity, I then block-lettered what I was thankful for.

I laugh at the image of such a thing: some dude in flannels and a Spongebob Squarepants shirt, samurai-swording a pencil in front of a Picasso. Haha, Jesus...

Anyway, after finishing this exercise of illegibility, I got up from the bench fully expecting -- and fully willing to accept -- another glorious flare.  But it wasn't that bad.  Of course, the balloons/implants were still there, but it wasn't that bad.  The rest of the day I walked 20 steps, sat for 10 minutes, went to the next work, sat, and so on...Rbcyclist's method meets the Renaissance!

Why do I mention this?  For one, I realized that while it is ridiculous that at age 26 I am miserable walking, I can still walk and therefore should just give it a go but in somewhat measured (or not fully nihilistic) fashion. Although we all have questioned the doctor's diagnosis or the radiologist's interpretation of the MRI or the PT's stressing of biomechanics, there wasn't anything SO obviously or structurally wrong with me that I risked genuine damage to my joints by walking a bit more.  At least that was my interpretation, however antithetical.  I just figured: "Let's give it shot.  What's the worst that could happen?  Another nasty flare? Bring it on."

Basically, I seemed to have -- or perhaps partly perceived to have -- pissed the hell out of my knees earlier in the day, and yet I was (relatively) fine by the end of it.  Why? Maybe it was the pajama-clad-catharsis?  Perhaps, but I think it was more just about moving around and -- although this runs contra to what we all have discussed here, both in terms of experience and theory -- distracted myself enough to get past my obsession with the initial pangs of pain which may have been the result of simply not doing much. In this case, the benefit of movement outweighed the cost of irritating them, I guess. (Of course, your experience seems to suggest that one inflammatory episode screws you for the day.  That was my experience, too.  But then this happened.)  In my experience, I was at my worst when I did the least. 

That said, do I do this everyday? God no.  At least not the walking part.  The pajama-clad-catharsis, of course.  Walking isn't ideal, that's why I jig and swim.

I'll give another example:  Yesterday, I had a long meeting at work.  Knees were getting restless -- angry, as it were.  Usually, I would just go home and ice.  Instead, I took a cab to the pool at the gym I go to, and it seemed to calm them down, more so than ice or an NSAID.  Much to my delight, I woke up this morning without that Jello-balloon-implant feeling.  Obviously this is not scientific, but it suggests to me that this pool thing can actually be therapeutic and perhaps even prevent a full blown inflammatory episode. 

In short, I was in CONSTANT state of irritation for a month, and moving seemed to get me out of it, even though it initially caused discomfort.  Further, the swim thing seemed to prevent or at least mitigate an otherwise inevitable inflammatory episode.  I seemed to have overcome my coefficient of static friction and am now going all kinetic, I hope.

Screw brevity.  I am mad as hell and I'm not going to take it anymore!!  Without a hostage, there is no ransom. That's what ransom is. Those are the friggin' rules, er, PFPS!

Nothing is fudged here, dude. We got this.

Offline knee always hurts

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #40 on: October 22, 2010, 06:07:24 PM »
Thanks for that. A very human story. I probably shouldn't be whining on here. Everyone is in pain or they wouldn't be here. But it was quite depressing to be having those sharp pains for no apparent reason.

I think I've always tended towards the nihilistic, anyway. My rational mind looks at the universe and sees a certain, unbending determinism, like it knew where it was going from the beginning of time. But as a being, sometimes the seeming sheer randomness, and senselessness, and absurdity of it all gets to you. When everything is going alright, you can ignore that nagging feeling that it might all be pointless by distracting yourself with trifling pleasures. But with this constant reminder, it is all too overwhelming sometimes.

I remember the first time that I felt like I was entombed in my body. My hearing had been damaged, and as I result, I experienced a constant ring in my ear. It wasn't stopping, so I did a bit of research. I started reading that it might never go away. After a couple of weeks, I realized that this was probably true for me. The thoughts crossed my mind. I'll never experience silence again. Just the pure, unadulterated joy of silence. I can't escape this ring. For several months, it drove me crazy. But finally, acceptance. It's still there, and there is still no silence almost 4 years on now. But it doesn't really bother me much at all.

But as annoying as a constant ring can be, it's not really the same thing as pain. It doesn't really affect any other aspect of my life. This seemingly changes everything. The fact is, I guess, that I am still capable of doing quite a lot, as long as it is walking on a flat surface. It's interesting that I can barely walk a few steps without triggering an ache in my knee, yet I could probably walk 1000 times that without it getting that much worse. The anxiety comes from the fact that it is a seemingly inescapable situation. I've been buried alive, and nobody can hear me pounding on the lid of the casket.

I've avoided thinking much about it, but I do recall in the saveyourself.ca e-book that it was noted that some people never recover. There is no chance of recovery, because any amount of load starts that pain response cycle again. Even if you irritate your knee quite quite a bit, it seems like it will calm down again in time. But never enough so that you can really recover. That's not like the condition I was facing a couple of months ago, where there was hell to pay for overdoing it. That may not be the case with this, but that isn't much consolation. I know enough about the mind to know that the main problem, ultimately, is my own perception of the pain. But how does that change? The part of the mind that governs these things is subconscious. I can't just inoculate myself by resolving to not be bothered any longer. It doesn't work like that.

The friggin' rules are the friggin' rules, I guess. For PFPS and everything else.

Offline SqshPlr8

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #41 on: October 22, 2010, 08:02:00 PM »
No apologies needed, man.  I completely empathize with the feeling -- in fact, at first I felt a bit awkward about sharing that story, but in the end I am glad I did (movie quotes and all). Of course it is always important to keep perspective ("I CAN do this or that"), but it is equally important to acknowledge how you actually feel at that moment, however "over-reactionary" it may be.  That's at least one thing I've learned.

This is a (semi?)anonymous forum; this should be the very place where one can express his/her feelings without fear of being judged.  Frankly, I think the reason my condition deteriorated to such a degree this summer was my self-denial: Pain when walking? Can't be, I'm 26 and otherwise healthy...Pain when sitting? Can't be...Perhaps it would be a good idea if I took a cab? Time off work? Nope, can't do it...

Your advice to walk like a "turtle" saved my knees.  Had I kept on walking and walking, it surely would have spelled catastrophe. 

That said, I probably took it to an extreme. I was terrified of pain.  I avoided it at all imaginable costs -- for good reason, of course, as I had kept getting worse and worse over four months.  But I think I went too far.  I started to get these constant horrendous aches.  Walking was slightly better but sleeping and just lying down were quite difficult. 

Perhaps I was strangely lucky that I couldn't escape the pain, as it forced me to wave my "white flag," act somewhat irrationally, and just try something else: start moving with some level of discomfort and through those initial, sharp pains.  I think this helped me both psychologically and physically, even though I intended only to improve the former.  I gave up on the latter.   I felt completely stuck.

The irony is, however, that my "surrendering" is the very thing that -- knock on wood -- has helped out my knees.

If not in a pool, perhaps try putting your legs in a full bath?  I don't know your pain, but I can tell you that my knees, even when actively irritated, have responded well to passively kicking -- or just floating -- in water.   Have you tried any caspacin creams? (I think I read about it in one of the articles you posted about the PFPS "nerve model")

I'm not out of the dark by any stretch.  I could just as easily flare up and end up in a state of perpetual pain.  But there is hope.

Offline knee always hurts

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #42 on: October 22, 2010, 08:45:27 PM »
I figure that you might as well say what's on your mind. Speak the truth of your emotions, of your experiences, of your mind. It's often the only antidote to that heretofore mentioned absurdity. Who cares what somebody else thinks, anyway? If they judge somebody that harshly for expressing genuine feelings, what good is their opinion? That's not a good character trait in my book, and rather disqualifies any other of their views from my consideration.

I'll have to try that bathtub idea. I sit down to take a shower, anyway, so maybe I'll just take a bath. It's worth trying anything, I suppose.

I purchased the tape today, got 16' for about $10. It does help with some people, though whether the relief constitutes actual therapeutic benefit, or is simply temporary relief, is something which the verdict is out on. But maybe it will help me.

I didn't have any sharp pains yesterday, and haven't had any yet today either. But that persistent ache is omnipresent. It just doesn't calm down. Maybe water can deload the knees just enough to let them rest a bit. That makes some sense.

If you're still having trouble sleeping, find something with diphenhydramine HCl in it. It really works. When my previous condition was at it's worst, I would wake up some nights with my knee on fire. Many nights I had trouble getting 2 or 3 hours of sleep. As soon as I started taking the sleep aid, I never slept less than 7 hours. I don't need it now, thank goodness. But it was useful then. Lovely fat pad impingement. At least that's gone. I guess you have to try to look on the bright side of things, even when life isn't a glittering rainbow with unicorns dancing beneath.

Offline smillie

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #43 on: October 23, 2010, 02:41:45 AM »
Anonymity on these boards is such a good things. There have been many things that I've said here that I would never say to my friends, and perhaps not even my family.  We're all in pain, we're all frustrated, or most of us, anyway, so we understand each other or at least get where we're coming from.

So, sqshPlr8, did you ever decide what to do about the scooter? I just took a little tour via crutches around my house and surveyed the scene. The laundry is piling up, but I can't carry it all to the laundry room. There were dishes to do, and I can figure out how to get them done eventually, but good heavens, it takes forever. I homeschool my kids and haven't done as good a job as I should have this week. And there are a million other things to get done. I'm tired of asking for so much help and would love to just get things done. I'd like to carry my dishes to the kitchen after I eat, for that matter. I can be patient for a few days or even weeks if I know the end is in sight, but I don't know where that end is or what it would look like.  I want to be mobile in my house! I've tried scooting around some in my desk chair with limited success. It's just really tempting to get a wheel chair so I can be productive.  That would probably totally freak out my family. They're already befuddled with the crutches coming out again.

Ugh...I just need some way to bypass the knee and get on my merry way!  <My ideas may get really creative this evening as I'm medicating with margaritas tonight...>
patella pain began early teens
'94 TTT/LR/VMO adv.
'94 MUA
'10 tried PT again
1/11 scope/hardware removal
4/11 (Finally!) dx medial instability due to LR
5/9/11 LPFL reconstruction scheduled

Offline knee always hurts

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Re: To scooter or not to scooter?
« Reply #44 on: October 24, 2010, 04:17:24 PM »
Margarita induced, eh? I've never been intoxicated during any of my rants. Guess I'm just crazy!

It sounds like you're a super-mom, smillie. I know the type. My sister home schools her kids. Holy moley, she would be miserable in my condition. In a way, I'm glad it's me and not her. I certainly don't have anything like the level of responsibilities that she has. I just can't imagine that, trying to take care of a family in this condition. My own belief is that you ultimately have to do what works. Have some goals in mind. How long can you tolerate trying a conservative approach? For most people, most of the time, a conservative approach would probably work. That's just the body's amazing ability to heal itself. But then there are those cases where, despite the best efforts of patient, this simply doesn't work. You have to have a plan for what's next. Don't take no for an answer. Be willing to travel if you have to.

There is a confluence of birthdays in my family in mid-late October, so we had a family get-together yesterday. My aunt has had a double TKR, because her knees were ruined by rheumatoid arthritis. A family friend had hip dysplasia, and ended up having both hips replaced at quite a young age. My uncle recently had avascular necrosis of the hip and the joint is just destroyed. He has no choice but to have a hip replacement now. If that is the only way for you to be pain free, accept it, and be willing to fight for it. These people's quality of life was dramatically improved by the treatment they got.

I am fortunate in that I live in the Boston metro area, which is where much of the joint replacement technology and arthroscopic surgery was pioneered. If I do need it, I'll probably be able to find a doctor who will deliver top notch, cutting edge care. If there is one thing I'm sure of, it's that I'm not willing to live the rest of my life in pain. I don't care what I have to do, but I'm going to beat this thing. If that involves a subtle coaxing back to health, great. If I have to chop that darn patella out of my knee, and get a prosthesis, so be it. One way or the other.

Keep moving forward!