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Author Topic: Should I get arthroscopy?  (Read 2107 times)

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Offline ikneedu

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Should I get arthroscopy?
« on: January 24, 2009, 06:10:37 AM »
About a year ago a taxi hit me while I was crossing in the street, resulting in right knee full ACL tear, left knee meniscal tear, and left foot broken metatarsal. I suffer from an autoimmune condition (CFS and fibromyalgia from Lyme) so already was always in some pain and the accident flared up the condition in mywhole body for months. I have decided not to get reconstruction of the ACL tear as since I'm a gal in my 40s doctors act like my life is worthless anyway, and the surgery sounds too big and scary, but they say I could get arthroscopic surgery on the meniscus.

I have scheduled the arthroscopy but am really having the urge to cancel. In my right knee I have pain mostly on the outside left and also a flulike feeling in the knee that was not there before the accident. Sometimes I limp but not often. The dr. who did an exam for the taxi insurance co. and is therefore my enemy told me that the surgery would only help the right side, I guess because I told him the pain was on the right side. Is there any truth to this? He also dismissed the pain by saying "you're in pain anyway" and the tear by saying "people have tears all over anyway." And, my CFS doctor, who is on my side, said that a study showed that exploratory arthroscopic surgery has been shown ineffective in pain reduction. It seems to me I saw that on the news but they were talking only about arthritis. Is there also a study saying it won't help for a meniscal tear?

Also will the surgery increase or reduce my chances of getting arthritis? (or make no difference).

I still have pain in all the areas affected in the accident, therefore I may also forever have pain from the surgery on and off though I can't say for sure--my body simply doesn't forget things. My metatarsal is healed so why does it still hurt? I just feel there are risks involved, yet perhaps it will actually do some good. On the other hand, does it often lead to more surgery? And do they put you under local or general anesthesia? (I'm in the US so maybe things are different here than there. Internet things say local OR general; I would think it is one or the other and not up to the patient as generally nothing is).

I don't have much time left to cancel the surgery and I'd really appreciate any advice on whether or not it's worth it! (not moneywise, just everything else)

The MRI report summary says:

1. There is an oblique tear of the antierior aspect of the medial menisicus contacting the superior surface.
2. There is mild knee joint effusion.

Thank you thank you!

Offline ghost

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2009, 08:53:08 AM »
Sorry to hear about all of the issues you have.  CFS and fibromyalgia are a real plateful.

Unless the docs are saying that the surgery will worsen the cfs or the fibro it seems to me that surgery should help clear up one area of pain.
I've had 5 knee surgeries in total.  3 in the past year with the last being at the beginning of December. 

I'm in not so warm or sunny NH.

First, the surgeon or anesthesiologist will often give you the option of general anesthesia or a spinal block.  It depends on what you prefer.  If you opt for the block you will have to hang around in recovery for a few hours until the block wears off.  On the flip side, it would allow you to watch the surgery on the computer screen as he does it.  I've always chosen the general because it wears off quicker and if I'm going to stay awake I want to watch the whole thing, not just a computer screen.  The proceedure takes between 30 to 45 minutes.  I've always been able to walk without the crutches within a day or two, but it takes about a month before all of the swelling and stiffness subsides and they will usually send you for some PT as well.  Most surgeons want to start pt at about the 1 week mark.

The MRI results mean that the front portion of the meniscus on the medial side (inside part of the knee) is torn.  The surgery will cut away the torn portion.  It's more likely than not that the tear is aggravating the knee's functioning and is causing the effusion  (swelling).    The surgery should resolve that problem, but I don't know how that impacts the other conditions.  If your knee is swolen and not functioning properly because of the swelling the surgery should resolve the right knee issue. 
Anytime you have surgery there is always some scar tissue that increases the chance of arthritis, but I had surgery on my right knee in the mid eighties and again in 2001 and for the most part that knee is pain free.  It's bothering me now but mostly because it's spent the last year compensating for the problems in the left knee. 

Four of the five surgeries I had were for meniscal tears.  The last surgery was microfracture in the trochlear groove because I injured the knee in a fall and tore up all the cartilage.  Microfracture is a technique used to stimulate the body to produce some new cartilage to fill in the area where it's missing.

I hate, the doc's who give you that live with it attitude.  If it's going to reduce pain in the long haul why should you live with more pain than you have to.  Unless they are saying that it will aggravate another condition or that it won't resolve the pain in the right knee I think it's worth a shot.  If you can get rid of one area of pain why should your have to live with it? 

Hopefully some of this helps answer some of your questions.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Ghost

rt k med meniscus 1983
rt k lat meniscus 2001
lft k med meniscus 12/07
lft knee medial meniscus 6/08 with chondroplasty & debridement of the suprapatella pouch
lft knee trochlear groove MFX 12/2/08 with chondroplasty and debridement of the suprapatella pouch
7/31/09 trochlear groove resurfacing

Offline JaneDown

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2009, 10:14:05 AM »
Hi Ikneedu
well I'm going to give you the total opposite advice that Ghost has given you. My experience is not a positive one and I wish I'd never had the "Simple arthroscopy" to clean up my meniscal tears as I am now in much worse state, the surgery actually did more damage than good and if I could turn the clock back I would have lived with the sporadic pain I had from the torn mensiscus. I too am a woman of 40, not at all sporty, not overweight but neither am I particularly fit. I don't run or do any real exercise so I now realise that the sporadic pain from my knees wasn't really hindering me doing very much at all! Now I am VERY limited in what I can do, thanks to the surgery! I had a bilateral arthroscopy last year and the OS found tears in both my lateral meniscii but found that the medial meniscii were perfectly healthy. Post the surgery I just knew that it couldn't be right to be in so much pain but my GP, the OS and the PT alll told me it would get better, that I must build up my quads and take pain killers and get on with it. After more than 2 months I insisted on having MRIs done as by that stage I was still using crutches and in tons of pain and the left knee just felt so "wrong" and I knew something had happened in there! The good old British NHS took rather a long time to get to the point where I got the results of those scans, but this week I had an appointment with my OS to discuss them. He looked rather uncomfortable when he had to tell me that my previously perfect medial meniscus in the left knee (the knee I just knew something had gone wrong in) now hasa  large tear in it, that must have happended during the surgery!! And my left knee has a tear in the lateral meniscus, either that he missed or that he caused!! There is still inflammation and heat in my left knee even after 4 months. I am still unable to crouch or kneel, go down stairs, jump and couldn't even think about breaking into a jog even if I wanted to. My knees, as well as coming out of the surgery with more tears than they went in with, were really traumatised by it, maybe because of my age, maybe because I was not a particularly athletic person. Either way my recovery is very slow.
I actually agree with your insiurance doc who told you that loads of people have tears all over the place that they just live with. I was told that something like 88% of dead bodies at autopsy have torn cartillage all over the place that either they didn't know about or they just lived with as part of the minor aches and pains of the ageing process.
Your knee has already been traumatised by a car crash. It will never be the same again, will probably never be pain free and there's nothing to say that any of the aching symptoms are from the mensicus. A surgrey on it is another trauma your knee will need to recover from, and may not! You were only hit by the car a year ago, please think about waiting longer to decide on surgery. The human body is a remarkable machin that can recover slowly from all sorts of dreadful things. Your accident is still something your body is getting over. A friend of mine who smashed his knee at ice-skating was told that it would take about 3 years for his knee to make its full recovery. It was almost excatly 3 years when he realised that it felt totally better.
I was unlucky that my surgery went very obviously wrong, but lots of people I have spoken to since say they regret having arthroscopy for cartillage tears as it has done nothing significant to alleviate any symptoms and in many cases has just caused them further problems.
Regarding the on-set of arthritis, the fact you've alreeady had a major traumatic impact to your knee probably means that you have a hastened road to OA anyway. A meniscal tear can apparently speed up the rate at which you are likely to get the first signs of OA, but then if you have the tear removed the missing cartillage is also the reason you will hasten your route to OA! So you're damned if you do and damned if you don't!
My advice, for what it's worth, is leave your knee alone for another couple of years, look after it, take glucosamine tablets (might help and can't hurt!) and try to strengthen the muscles around the knee to help reduce impact on the joint. Then, if in a  couple of years time you still want to go for surgery at least you will have a knee that's not still recovering from the accident. Surgery on knees is brutal for them. Having had it done myself, I would never, ever consider it again.
Good luck and I hope your knee continues to recover.
jane
Knee pain since 2002
2006 MRI shows lateral meniscal tears
Oct 2008 Bilateral partial lateral meniscectomies (long recovery!!)
Jan 2009 MRI shows surgery caused damage to medial meniscus!!!
June 2013 knee injury, agony!!!
August 2013 - left knee medial partial meniscectomy

Offline SDowns

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2009, 01:34:22 PM »
You should talk to your layer.

By refusing to get medical care, are you releasing the taxi company from further liability??

Good luck.

Offline Audice

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2009, 01:58:07 PM »
Ikneedu ~ I'll fill in some of the remaining blanks by taking a middle of the road approach to your situation. First, let me say that I understand being written off by an OS who thinks you're beyond any sort of activity level that would warrant repairs or reconstruction of an ACL, in particular.

Three years ago, at age 67, I did all the damage to my knee that's listed below. Almost the first words out of the surgeon's mouth were to the effect that there'd be no ACLr because I was too old. Truth is I'm probably every bit as active as that young OS, just involved in a different sport. So, like you, I didn't appreciate being informed I was over the hill.

What this man did say was that if the meniscal tears became more than I wanted to cope with, he'd take care of them. Since I have no locking knee I've done nothing to this point. I know what I have. I can work with it but, I know I might not appreciate the end result of surgery. That I'll put off as long as I can. Even my internist asks when I'm going to do something about my knee.

I work at a horse farm, own a horse as well as large dogs. I work outdoors year round regardless of weather & do whatever I can to maintain the muscle integrity of my leg so that I won't have to go for PT. When my OS tested the strength of my leg he opined that whatever I was doing had made my leg good & strong & to just keep doing it. (Sure. 50 years of riding horses will develop ones legs,)The result is that my knee doesn't buckle but the torn menisci do prohibit me from kneeling or squating. My knee will get stiff & tight if I maintain one position for too long. But with slight modifications to my life I can deal with it all. Interestingly the farther I get from the accident date the fewer NSAIDs I use. I would say it's been months since I've even taken an Advil which at one time was my drug of choice.

Given your accident as well as your bout of Lyme & dealing with autoimmune problems, have you had any referral to a pain management clinic? With exercise & a good combination of pain meds, you might find you can handle what's been dealt to you w/o surgery. Wishing you the best...Ellie
April, 2005 - ACL rupture, medial meniscus tear within posterior horn to articular surface, abnormal signal within lateral meniscus, partial tear MCL, bone contusions tibia/fibula, Baker's cyst.
No repairs.

Offline eaglemom

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2009, 02:39:05 PM »
ok since we're all jumping in here its my turn.  Since you've looked at websites about knees and you mention your knee pain - I'd say these are things that are bothering you.  Any surgery is scarry - doesn't matter if its a scope or not.  Yes you have other circumstances with your health going on, but seems like this taxi knee is an issue to you.  I've had 1 scope on my right knee and it is good, I've had 2 on the left and am going to have the third within the month.  The surgery doesn't always fix everything, sometimes causes other things - but doing nothing really won't help you at all.  Sorry to sound blunt there.  Obviously its a personal decision - you decide on your quality of life and go from there.

Offline ikneedu

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2009, 02:44:46 AM »
Thanks Ghost. I think it will worsen the CFS and fibro at least temporarily. I don't know what the docs think (but they don't have CFS and fibro). I told my CFS doc I thought it would flare it and he didn't disagree. May I ask why you had so many surgeries? Because my prime concern here is the pattern of one surgery leading to another. I want to have ONE arthroscopy, no more.

I agree, they should not be so casual about telling you to live with pain or say things to the effect of "you're in pain anyway so who cares if you're in more pain?" But that was the insurance doctor--just having those exams should be illegal imho as a doctor takes the Hippocratic oath, not the Hypocritic one.




Unless the docs are saying that the surgery will worsen the cfs or the fibro it seems to me that surgery should help clear up one area of pain.
I've had 5 knee surgeries in total.  3 in the past year with the last being at the beginning of December. 


I hate, the doc's who give you that live with it attitude.  If it's going to reduce pain in the long haul why should you live with more pain than you have to.  Unless they are saying that it will aggravate another condition or that it won't resolve the pain in the right knee I think it's worth a shot.  If you can get rid oThanf one area of pain why should your have to live with it? 

Hopefully some of this helps answer some of your questions.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Ghost



Offline ikneedu

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2009, 02:54:55 AM »
Thanks JaneDown,

Wow, that is a really scary story. It sounds like your doctor really messed you up. I hope you have some legal recourse.

About the tears all over the body, when the tear is in a joint that takes all the weight a knee does, I think it's different than other tears and there is more reason to fix it. But I think doctors and hospital staff are tired and and they make mistakes.

The full ACL tear has healed somewhat in the past year and my ortho was a bit surprised. It doesn't go out anymore, though it still feels a bit unstable. The left knee meniscal tear seems to hurt more,  and I limp once in a while. But I don't know if the surgery will help.


Hi Ikneedu
well I'm going to give you the total opposite advice that Ghost has given you. My experience is not a positive one and I wish I'd never had the "Simple arthroscopy" to clean up my meniscal tears as I am now in much worse state, the surgery actually did more damage than good and if I could turn the clock back I would have lived with the sporadic pain I had from the torn mensiscus.

My advice, for what it's worth, is leave your knee alone for another couple of years, look after it, take glucosamine tablets (might help and can't hurt!) and try to strengthen the muscles around the knee to help reduce impact on the joint. Then, if in a  couple of years time you still want to go for surgery at least you will have a knee that's not still recovering from the accident. Surgery on knees is brutal for them. Having had it done myself, I would never, ever consider it again.
Good luck and I hope your knee continues to recover.
jane

Offline ikneedu

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2009, 03:00:00 AM »
Thanks SDowns. Yes, I will talk to him. But they will still have to give me a settlement, it would just be less than if I had the surgery. I turned down full ACL surgery on the other knee but I don't see that as refusing care. The suit is really for pain and suffering, of which I had plenty (and continue to have some of). It may not look that great to back out of surgery, but I can't make medical decisions based on the settlement.

You should talk to your layer.

By refusing to get medical care, are you releasing the taxi company from further liability??

Good luck.

Offline ikneedu

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2009, 03:22:57 AM »
Thanks Audice. That sounds sensible. But in a way, you don't know if surgery would help til you have it. I guess there's no reason for the meniscal tears to get worse unless there is further injury to them. But further injury after surgery I would think would be worse as surgery probably creates a precarious situation in the knee, making less pain but more delicateness (I'm just guessing).

You sound like you're in great shape and so outdoorsy, I wish I were like that. I do yoga, walk, some swimming, unless I'm having a flareup. I did go to a pain clinic once and the doctor immediately implied my pain was mental and asked if I had a lot of friends. (I should have asked him if HE did.) I take Tramadol every day 2 to 3x a day for joint and muscle pain, and I already had knee pain before the accident that I would put Lidocaine patches on--that died down a bit. Now when it flares I use ice in addition to the Tramadol. Treating intestinal candida and low thyroid has helped the pain levels a bit, and I just started (finally) to go to a really good CFS doctor who really gets to the nitty gritty of all the toxins and infections that cause it. I did several mos. of physical therapy after the accident and it was somewhat helpful with pain--I liked the electrostim and massages the most. I also can't squat on the knee now, not that I have to, but it would be nice to do the things I did before. I think part of the issue is that I want back what the cab took away; it's different than if I was doing my thing and wore out my knee.

Thank you, I will think about what you said, you're a good example of a nonsurgical way to handle it.




Ikneedu ~ I'll fill in some of the remaining blanks by taking a middle of the road approach to your situation. First, let me say that I understand being written off by an OS who thinks you're beyond any sort of activity level that would warrant repairs or reconstruction of an ACL, in particular.

Given your accident as well as your bout of Lyme & dealing with autoimmune problems, have you had any referral to a pain management clinic? With exercise & a good combination of pain meds, you might find you can handle what's been dealt to you w/o surgery. Wishing you the best...Ellie

Offline ikneedu

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2009, 03:27:21 AM »
Thanks eaglemom. Yes, they are bothering me and as I said to Audice, I want back at least some of what the taxi took away, esp. as I already was in pain. But I won't be out of pain regardless, unless I beat CFS, and my other knee will still be messed up unless I get the big surgery. It does help to think about all the issue involved. Yet, maybe the one nagging ache will go away (would be nice). Or maybe it will be worse!


ok since we're all jumping in here its my turn.  Since you've looked at websites about knees and you mention your knee pain - I'd say these are things that are bothering you.  Any surgery is scarry - doesn't matter if its a scope or not.  Yes you have other circumstances with your health going on, but seems like this taxi knee is an issue to you.  I've had 1 scope on my right knee and it is good, I've had 2 on the left and am going to have the third within the month.  The surgery doesn't always fix everything, sometimes causes other things - but doing nothing really won't help you at all.  Sorry to sound blunt there.  Obviously its a personal decision - you decide on your quality of life and go from there.

Offline Silkncardcrafts

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2009, 08:05:40 AM »
Hi there,

I  can not stand doctors that tell you are over the hill and too old for surgery. That is rubbish. It depends on how active you are and what type of lifestyle you have.

If I was you I would go ahead and have the arthroscope. Jane's situation is very unusual and doesn't often happen. That is typical of the NHS unfortunately.

I had a car accident last year and had an independent assessment last year so know what those kinds of doctors are like. Don't listen to what those insurance doctors say. Often they are not up with the latest treatments and don't know what they are talking about.

A few friends have had surgery for meniscus tears and have all done very well. They have a much better quality of life and much of their pain has gone.

Don't be put off what your OS about being too old for an ACL reco. Personally I would go ahead and have that done too. Find an OS that believes it's worthwhile doing. Nothing worse than an unstable knee. I have patella instability for a long time so know what it's like. At the moment I have an injury to my postero lateral corner so feels very unstable. Waiting to see my OS in 8 days. I am a very active person so for me there would be no choice but to have ACL reconstructive surgery.

Good luck with whatever decision you make.
11/1996 - RK LR
07/1997 - LK LR
11/1998 - LK MPFL Reco
12/2005 - RK LR Repair
07/2006 - LK MPFL Repair
11/2006 - LK LR Repair
22/05/08 - LK Trochleoplasty
11/02/10 - RK Trochleoplasty
07/03/11 - RK Chrondroplasty

Offline Kaputt_Knee

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2009, 08:46:58 AM »
You have really to make your decision in consultation with your specialists for CFS and Fibro. The orthopaedic decision is really to go in and take a look to see how bad the damage is and if necessary repair it. Age is no longer a factor in the decision it is the quality of your life that really is the deciding factor. But your auto-immune system problems are a spanner in the works that most of us cannot comprehend. There is a Bulletin Board for Fibromyalgia where you may get some more informed help with regards to the effects of surgery on your condition. A Knee Geek who had major problems after knee surgery ended up there and has had a lot of support and help from the members there.

As you rightly state at the beginning of your first post it is the CFS and Fibro that are your main problems and you do not want to make those worse as the constant pain and problems associated with those two are already bad enough.

One thing to bear in mind here on Knee Geeks is that this is a Bulletin Board mostly for people who have problems resulting from either their treatment, their injury or their rehab. There are nearly 24,000 members, of which less than a couple of hundred are really active. Of that couple of hundred, maybe a dozen or so have had major post-operative problems. Knee Guru is a wonderful resource with loads of information, which is why I ended up here. It helped me make informed decisions. But there are a disproportionate number of "horror" stories, from all quarters of the world. You really need to keep that in mind when making decisions.

In reality arthroscopic surgery is undertaken all over the world dozens of times per day and the patients never ever feel the need to come to a place like this as their problems are solved. It is as it says, minimally invasive and post-operative problems are, contrary to the impressions given here, extremely rare. If you look at the members list you will find countless members who have never felt the need to post, or they posted once ot twice, got some pointers and moved on. Just do a sort on the number of posts to see what I mean. As a member this is something you can do to retain a perspective on things.

Good luck with your decision making. I hope you can resolve ALL your pain problems not just the knee stuff!

Sue  ;)

1989 big trauma R. knee - sorted
1990-2004 3ACL recons and 20+ arthroscopies -RK
3/06 LK ACL torn!
4/06 ACL recon, kneecap broken
09 &10/06- 2x meniscus trims
3/07 - Notch Plastic & Lateral Release
14/8/08 complete revision ACL plus LCL/PLC recon
6/2/09 returned to skiing! Whoopee

Offline ghost

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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2009, 09:16:31 AM »
 Ineedu,

To answer your question about the multiple surgeries they were all unrelated.

In the early 80's I tore the medial meniscus in my right knee and had it repaired.  I had no problems and was able to play basketball, softball and tennis with no issues.  In 2001, during a basketball game I tore the lateral meniscus in the right knee and had it fixed, again with no problems.

In Sept of 2007 I squatted down to pick something up and tore the posterior horn of my medial meniscus in my left knee.  In December of 2007 I had it fixed and was about 3 weeks out from the surgery when I fell on the ice and landed with the left knee under me.  The os just thought I tweaked it, but after 3 months of pt we knew I had done more and an mri showed that I had retorn the meniscus and had torn a larger area of articular cartilage in the trochlear groove as well as suffering a partial tear of the quad tendon attachment.  In June of 2008 I had a second surgery where he removed the torn part of the meniscus and the pieces of cartilage that were hanging off of the trochlear groove and tried to release the scar tissue around the quad tendon attachment.  Again, I had no post op issues and was able to walk without crutches the day after surgery, however, I never recovered enough to be able to squat, kneel or go up and down stairs. My physical therapist recommended that I see a surgeon in Boston because he felt that the limitations were being caused by the missing cartilage in the trochlear groove which left me with a bone on bone situation.  I followed his advise and saw Dr. Thomas Gill at Mass General Hospital.  Dr. Gill felt that the therapist was right about the source of the pain and recommended doing this microfracture surgery.  That surgery involves drilling small holes in the bone to make the bone bleed, the marrow and blood that the bone releases forms a superclot which is supposed to turn into a fiberous sort of replacement cartilage to fill in the area where I had no cartilage.  I had that done on December 2, 2008, about 8 weeks ago. This time I was on cratuches for about 3 days. The rehabilation from this surgeury is a long one and takes alot of patience, but hopefully it will be worth it.  For the first 8 weeks I was in a hinged full leg brace and couldn't bend the knee more than 30 degrees and when I wasn't in the brace I was using a continuous passive motion machine for 10 hours a day.  With microfracture a great deal of the success or failure depends on the patient strictly following the rehab protocol. I was very faithful about it.  I returned to work in  4 days and returned to the gym at about 4 weeks.  At this stage I'm able to ride a stationary bike about 3 miles a day as well as doing some time on an arc trainer.  I still have a small but barely perceptible,  limp when I walk, but can go up stairs wtih no problems for the first time in nearly a year and a half.  I still can't go down stairs and am still being cautious about putting too much weight on the knee while it's bent, but I thnk that is a matter of time.  The knee has to get used to working with this new cartilage and I have some more work to do to rebuild the quads which disappear pretty quickly due to the brace.  Yesterday I tried the hip abduction/adduction machine at the gym for the first time and was able to resume my normal resistance of 125 lbs with no problems.  I won't know for another couple of months whether or not this surgery did the trick but the early signs are quite good.  Since the rest of my knee is in good condition and I'm not quite 50 yet the OS doesn't want to consider a knee replacement at this stage.  If this surgery ultimately fails the next proceedure would be an Autologous Chondral Transplant which would require another three surgeries so for the moment I'm focused on making sure I do whatever I can to make sure this surgery works.

I know there are others that haven't had the good fortune that I have.  I've been blest with skilled and very caring surgeons, but the surgery is only 1/2 the battle, the patient has to do their part.  I have to tell you that I never need any pain meds after any of the surgeries, not even a tylenol.  Yes, it was sore and stiff but you have to accept that.  They will tell you to start moving the knee the next day and you have to do it even though it's sore.  I literally started doing straight leg raises in the recovery room post surgery.  I figured I might as well start while the pain meds from the surgery were still on board.  You also need to keep the leg up and ice is for 20 minutes out of every hour for the first few days.  Both the ice and the movement will help to quickly take care of the swelling.
Ghost
rt k med meniscus 1983
rt k lat meniscus 2001
lft k med meniscus 12/07
lft knee medial meniscus 6/08 with chondroplasty & debridement of the suprapatella pouch
lft knee trochlear groove MFX 12/2/08 with chondroplasty and debridement of the suprapatella pouch
7/31/09 trochlear groove resurfacing

Offline ikneedu

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
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Re: Should I get arthroscopy?
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2009, 05:12:09 AM »
Thanks Ghost. I don't know, I can't say I 100% buy that they were unrelated. One surgery leads to another. I'm sorry you had to go through so much and I'm glad you can use them again.