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Author Topic: TKR Chronology w/questions  (Read 832 times)

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Offline bavage

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TKR Chronology w/questions
« on: October 22, 2008, 02:39:17 PM »
 Good morning.

Have been referring to this board for months and would appreciate your comments

Took a hard fall on July 4,2007. Swelling from ankle to top of knee began shortly after.

Had Meniscectomy August 16, 2007 to repair a tear. Surgeon had to remove 2/3 of meniscus instead.

This led to a TKR in July 17, 2008. Manipulation performed October 7, 2008

PT is stabilizing with decent extension and flexion @ 115 with aggressive assistance.

Am told scar tissue is preventing further progress.

Questions:

1. Should the surgeon not done the meniscus removal upon finding greater damage than anticipated?
2. Is the current 15 months of swelling normal?
3. Did the swelling cause,or become,scar tissue?
4. Is there a method to reduce the swelling without growing the scar tissue?

I apologize for being so clinical but it comes naturally to this nursing home Nutritionist . I believe that a reduction in the swelling could lead to increased flexion.

My research with nutrition for this situation has me taking chondrotin and glucosamine, refusing refined sugars and consuming more fish and vegetables while limiting red meats.

Thanks in advance for your reply.
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Offline jathib

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Re: TKR Chronology w/questions
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2008, 03:14:26 PM »
1. Should the surgeon not done the meniscus removal upon finding greater damage than anticipated?
It's normal protocol to remove the torn bits of meniscus. More usual than doing an actual repair which cannot always be done and they fail often due to the lack of a blood supply. Leaving a tear in there is a bad idea.

Quote
2. Is the current 15 months of swelling normal?
I think that would depend on the extent of the injury.

I don't know the answers to the rest of the questions. I am wondering why you jumped into a knee replacement so soon. I would have gotten several more opinions before doing that.

Offline bavage

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Re: TKR Chronology w/questions
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2008, 04:16:31 PM »
The TKR was performed after two opinions were obtained. An MRI showed that half of the knee was smooth while the other half looked like the back side of the moon due to arthritis. They considered a half knee replacement but decide on a full because of my age ( 60 ).

Also, it became impossible to walk for more than 10 minutes without resting. Steroid injections were done once with only a few days respite. I was 'bowed' out to a large degree and my gait was terrible.

Do you know of any websites that explain how scar tissue is formed?

Thank you.
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Offline jathib

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Re: TKR Chronology w/questions
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2008, 05:00:59 PM »
Well, that makes more sense. Although, I don't think age matters when it comes to having a partial knee replacement. It's always a better option. I had mine at age 48.

At any rate, there's lots of information on this site about scar tissue. It is something that is completely unavoidable after surgery. Everybody gets scar tissue, some people get a lot more than others. Some can be prevented with post-op protocol but not all. It sounds like your knee is doing very well so I'm not sure why you're worried with 115 degrees. It can take a year or more to completely recover and heal from a TKR. You're only a few months out so it's not surprising that you still have swelling. Swelling alone can keep you from bending your knee farther.















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