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Author Topic: Compartment Syndrome?  (Read 2530 times)

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Offline Surgeon2Be

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Compartment Syndrome?
« on: April 23, 2008, 08:50:16 PM »
Has anyone here ever had Compartment Syndrome on their lower leg? I recently injured my knee and am scheduled for arthroscopy, but I'm having, what feels like, to be terrible shin splints. I did strain my calf, but the pain is horrible just to the right of my shin on my right leg. It also swells up alittle bit.
Thanks in advance :)

Offline KW

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Re: Compartment Syndrome?
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2008, 08:59:35 PM »
You can read up on Conpartment Syndrome here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compartment_syndrome  but from what I know (and i could very well be wrong) it is a emergency situation that requires immediate attention.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2008, 09:03:20 PM by KW »
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Offline ATsoccergirl

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Re: Compartment Syndrome?
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2008, 09:59:01 PM »
I had compartment syndrome following my ACL revision.  Mine developed over a couple of weeks, first starting with just some aching in my shin to numbness in my foot and ankle.  Initially, my surgeon just said to keep an eye on it.  However, when I started having the numbness, I went in and they took compartment pressures and confirmed that I had it.  If it had continued to get worse, I would have need emergency surgery to release the pressure (fasciotomy).  But I was put back on crutches and was non-weightbearing until the symptoms resolved. 

I would suggest that you call your surgeon and descibe your symptoms to them.  Severe pain is one part of compartment syndrome, but the neurological symptoms are what the doctors will look out for, since that signifies that there may be some tissue death occuring. 
1999 LR, 2002 ACL/PLC recon, reversal of LR, 2004 ACL revision, 2006 Car accident torn PCL and small fractures resulting in bone chips in my knee.  Torn MCL 3 times.  Wicked screws under IT band and Pes Anserine.  June 2008-Hip Arthroscopy.

Offline Surgeon2Be

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Re: Compartment Syndrome?
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2008, 10:26:14 PM »
I have had shin pain since 2 years ago. I play competitive soccer and don't remember any traumatic injury, but when playing soccer, my shin would be throbbing, swell up, and go slighty numb(more like pins and needles than complete numbness). After about a day, the pain and swelling would die down. During the off season I don't have any shin pain. Only if I walk too much. As of right now with my current injury(torn lateral meniscus, inflamed plica), I do not have a lot of foot or lower leg strengh after 1 1/2 months at PT and arthroscopy coming up. I also experience extreme calf cramping at night which hurts just like the night I injured my knee. They eventually die down after 40 minutes. Some people said this could be physcological(spelling?)?

Offline ATsoccergirl

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Re: Compartment Syndrome?
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2008, 05:51:36 PM »
I play soccer also, which my surgeon believe was one of the reasons I developed compartment syndrome.  I don't know about you, but If I could get away with it, I would not wear shin guards.  So I have taken quite a few hard hits to my shins.  From the damage from the repeitive hits, it caused scar tissue to form.  Scar tissue is not as resiliant as normal tissue and cannot expand.  So when I had swelling in my lower leg following surgery, the fluid had no where to go, so it increased my compartmental pressure resulting in the pain and numbness.

It does sound like you may have compartment syndrome, but it could also be a sign of other neuromuscular problems.
1999 LR, 2002 ACL/PLC recon, reversal of LR, 2004 ACL revision, 2006 Car accident torn PCL and small fractures resulting in bone chips in my knee.  Torn MCL 3 times.  Wicked screws under IT band and Pes Anserine.  June 2008-Hip Arthroscopy.

Offline J-Okr

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Re: Compartment Syndrome?
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2008, 07:18:05 PM »
Read up on compartment syndrom as much as you can - I have it in the posterior section of my lower calf, and know how painful it can be...especially those cramps at night!!!!!

There's 2 kinds of compartment syndrome.  The first is acute, and is a medical emergency, as others have said. 
The other kind is chronic (this is the kind I have been diagnosed with).  From what I've read, this usually is either exercise induced (like runners who train to much, etc), or can be from an injury.  The pain usually comes on after you've been using the leg for a while, and then the pain goes away after you've stopped.  This isn't a medical emergency, but sometimes if it doesn't resolve on it's own, a fasciotomy is needed.

Here's some info on compartment syndrome:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome/DS00789

http://adam.about.com/encyclopedia/infectiousdiseases/Compartment-syndrome.htm

Hope some of this helps!!

J.