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Author Topic: Ironman training  (Read 1094 times)

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Offline Trotsky

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Ironman training
« on: January 02, 2008, 10:52:04 AM »
I am 2 weeks post op (had some cartilage scraped away) and am keen to get back to training but am getting conflicting advice from my 'experts'.
- My coach has said not to run at all until he sees how my knee responds to cycling and swimming (VERY short distances).
- My physio says I can't run until I build up my quads, but has given me a 60 minute run in the pool each day (against a current).
- My doc/surgeon told me I could run pretty much as soon as the wounds healed (now).

There  is some discomfort around the portholes of my knee, and I am getting some pain when I move it laterally e.g. twisting out of bike pedals.

Basically my question is this - what advice is correct and what are the risks of starting heavier training (longer cycles and some light running).

Thanks a bunch.

Offline billythehamster

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Re: Ironman training
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2008, 11:10:01 AM »
Personally I would take the advise of the Physio. I think they have the most experience in recovering from injuries. You will see the PT far more than the surgeon. Coaches do tend to have experience with injuries but it's not their 'full time' profession.

Offline Aff

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Re: Ironman training
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2008, 11:50:41 AM »
i had a chondroplasty a month ago and am now starting to feel ready to up my levels of training.

i would listen to the physio, they will give you progressive exercises until you are able to actually do what you think you can.

in the meantime just work on legs with non-impact stuff like lunges, leg-press, etc (if you feel able).  once they're strong enough you can progress onto low-impact up to eventually (hopefully) high.

this is where i am now, the legs feel stronger but i don't know if they're ready for more so awaiting physio to be available to me.

the key is progressive training with your physio and patience.

if you suddenly start running without the exercises that take you between static non-impact exercises and high impact running, which is the whole weight of your body onto one joint you risk injury.

this is where i am now too in a slow move back towards my beloved impact sports.

Offline Trotsky

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Re: Ironman training
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2008, 03:04:49 PM »
Thanks - I'll do what you both suggest. The physio does seem to know what he's doing - nothing he's given me in the past has ever done anything but good.

Cheers.

Offline tanyap

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Re: Ironman training
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2008, 12:33:25 PM »
your OS is the expert in how to fix problems, and what kind of activities may damage a surgery.

your physio is the expert in what you are able for in your rehab.

so your OS is saying that you wont damage HIS work - but your physio is saying you are not yet strong enough to start running on the joint.

listen to your physio.

your coach is not an expert in knees. dont worry about his opinion :)
1986 - recurrent dislocations of right patella began
1988 - Modified Hauser Procedure
1991 - dislocations started again
2005 to 2007 - 150 dislocations in 2 years - OUCH!!!
June 2007 - new OS, new physio
Oct 2007 - VMO woke up
Mar 2008 - big quads, still dislocating
Apr 2008 - next OS app

Offline Aff

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Re: Ironman training
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2008, 03:21:42 PM »
i have trouble walking past a running machine without thinking 'shall i just give it a little run, just maybe a light one, nothing too much'.

however, i was doing physio before i knew i needed an op and as i was gaining ground and was desperate to run again (i think mainly to make me feel i was ok when i wasn't) i had a light run on the treadmill.

i managed 10 minutes.  at that stage i thought, omg, that's great.

so i dared to do it again 2 days later and the knee gave way and put me back months.  in the end i had to have surgery.

i have the feeling again to get on the treadmill and 'test' the joints but it's silly, i know it and only progressive training with the physio will get me back.

sports people are their own worst enemy.  unfortunately you may have to concentrate on just getting the knee back into shape asap rather than by a specific deadline as the latter does lead to frustration and a tendancy to push beyond what you should.

here's hoping it all heals well quickly :)