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Author Topic: Traveling After Surgery  (Read 1121 times)

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Offline Janet

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Traveling After Surgery
« on: March 13, 2003, 03:52:02 PM »
Here is a new article from Medscape about new guidelines about travel following orthopaedic surgery....no more than 3 hours for 3 months following surgery!

www.medscape.com/viewarticle/450404?mpid=10689

Janet

Sorry, I tried this link from my post and it wouldn't connect. But it connects if I copy and paste it into my search box. Don't know what the problem is. Hope you can link to it, because it's very interesting.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2003, 03:59:41 PM by Janet »
Torn quad tendon repair & VMO advancement 4/99, MUA with LOA 10/99, Patella baja and arthrofibrosis, LR & medial release & LOA 5/01, LOA & chondroplasty 6/03,TKR on 11/06, MUA 12/06. From perfect knees to a TKR in 7 years, all from a fall on a wet floor...and early undiagnosed scar tissue.

Offline Heather M.

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Re: Traveling After Surgery
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2003, 12:51:49 AM »
Janet,

Can you cut and paste the text--I couldn't get in to the link at all....

Heather
Scope #1: LR, part. menisectomy w/cyst, chondroplasty
#2-#5: Lysis of adhesions/scar tissue, AIR, patellar tendon debridement, infections, MUA, insufflation
#6: IT band release / Z-Plasty, synovectomy, LOA/AIR, chondroplasty
2006 Arthrofibrosis, patella baja
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hmaxwell

Offline Janet

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Re: Traveling After Surgery
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2003, 04:37:11 PM »
Sorry about the link not working. Don't know why. Here is the text.

Janet


Orthopaedic Surgery Patients Told Not to Travel for 90 Days
By Richard Woodman

LONDON (Reuters Health) Mar 06 - Patients who undergo major orthopaedic surgery are advised not to travel long distances for up to 3 months after their operations because of the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

The recommendation on Thursday by a group of British MPs follows research showing that travelling for more than 3 hours trebles the risk of DVT if the traveller has had recent surgery.

John Smith, chairman of the All-Party Group on Travel-Related DVT, warned that patients often go off on holiday to recover after hip or knee replacement operations, and are blissfully unaware of the risks of a long flight.

His warning was backed by Dr. Ander Cohen, a vascular surgeon who recently investigated the association between long-haul flights and DVT in 568 patients attending his clinic at King's College Hospital, London.

"What we found was that travelling for more than 3 hours results in a three-fold increase in the risk of DVT if the traveller has an additional risk factor for DVT, such as recent surgery," Dr. Cohen said at a news conference. The findings of his case-control study were published in a recent issue of the British Journal of Haematology.

He said heparin and other drugs to prevent DVT are usually only given for up to 10 days after surgery, even though the risk of DVT persists for much longer.

A Scandinavian study published last year found a highly significant 39% increase in the risk of death for up to 90 days after major orthopaedic surgery.

"This results in an excess death rate of 1 in every 240 patients. The most common cause of death is pulmonary embolism," Dr. Cohen continued.

Dr. Cohen, originally from Melbourne, Australia, said present guidance to orthopaedic patients is usual to "just be careful after surgery." There is no general recommendation not to travel.

He told Reuters Health that he decided to speak out publicly out of frustration that findings published in journals have not changed medical practice.

American physicians warned recently that as many as two million people, mostly those in hospitals, nursing homes or sick and immobile at home, develop DVT each year and that as many as 600,000 develop pulmonary embolisms.

British victims of so-called "economy class syndrome" have lodged an appeal earlier this year to win the right to sue some of the world's largest airlines for DVT.

Torn quad tendon repair & VMO advancement 4/99, MUA with LOA 10/99, Patella baja and arthrofibrosis, LR & medial release & LOA 5/01, LOA & chondroplasty 6/03,TKR on 11/06, MUA 12/06. From perfect knees to a TKR in 7 years, all from a fall on a wet floor...and early undiagnosed scar tissue.