Banner - Hide this banner





Author Topic: your meniscal repair  (Read 1556 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ibreakhearts66

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 150
  • Liked: 0
your meniscal repair
« on: November 15, 2006, 06:30:17 AM »
so, it looks like i'm having a meniscus repair the day before thanksgiving (eeee one week). i was just wondering how people who have had it have recovered.

my dr has told me i'll be on crutches around 4 weeks, and back to soccer in 4-6 months (hopefully closer to 4). I was just wondering what people were told and how long your recoveries were.

also, i was wondering what technique they used for you. my doctor was explaining to me why its better to have it done under GA (i wanted an epidural so i could watch...i want to be an OS), and he was saying it was like needle and thread. but the way he was demonstrating made it seem like each stich came completely through the knee. like in the front, out the back. i was wondering if this is actually a techinique, or if he just did a poor job explaining it. might he mean that it goes in and out of the meniscus but stays IN the joint?

but yeah, your stories, experiences post op, etc would be greatly appreciated! i am somewhat anxious to have the surgery, as the back of me knee has become quite sore (granted i was standing juggling a soccer ball for the past hour and a half or so).
16 years old

8-03 unhappy triad LK, undiagnosed by an idiot of an OS so now i wear a donjoy
PFS for the lasat 7 years or so
10-06 Cortizone shot LK
11-06 Scope for torn meniscus RK
3-07 right ankle recon

Offline kerryo12

  • MINIgeek (20-50 posts)
  • **
  • Posts: 37
  • Liked: 0
Re: your meniscal repair
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2006, 05:34:32 PM »
If you believe it, I am retyping my whole reply since the server didn't take it last time!!  ???

Anyhoooow....I had a meniscal repair done 3 weeks ago. It required 3 scope holes and one 'repair' incision about 4 inches long on the inside of my knee - it was my medial meniscus.

Post op, the pain was quite intense for the first 4 or 5 days, but has decreased each day with greater range of motion. I am to remain on crutches NON weight bearing for another week, and then hopefully can wean myself off of them. The heat from my knee is still intense. Surprising really. I commented that it is no wonder I am losing weight when my knee is on fire day and night burning so many calories!!  :-\

The hardest piece of the recovery has been the mental part. I was playing some great soccer and on a really superb team that I built up, so I am finding so hard to be left out. For you, as a young gun, this piece of it will be hard on you too. Focus on the exercises that you 'can' do and try to work out everyday so as you don't go crazy!!  ;)


Good luck!!
Kerry

Offline EyeSpy21

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 230
  • Liked: 0
  • User's Text
    • Surgery Video
Re: your meniscal repair
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2006, 10:01:19 PM »
I didn't have a repair, but a procedure with similar rehab to repair which involved stitching an implant onto the remainder of my meniscus.  I had an all-inside technique of stitching the implant, called FastFix.  One of the advantages of this technique is a shorter surgery time.  There is some info here http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/408520_6 (near the bottom of article) regarding the techniques.
R knee symptoms 2003
Feb 06: MRI extensive complex tear/shredded R medial meniscus
Aug 06: NHS offer removal of most of meniscus
Oct 06: Partial meniscectomy, plica resection and CMI in Germany
Mar 2008: R CMI failure
L knee symptoms 2006
Mar 2008: cartilage defect patella, pes anserine bursa

Offline EyeSpy21

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 230
  • Liked: 0
  • User's Text
    • Surgery Video
Re: your meniscal repair
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2006, 10:03:10 PM »
Oh, link doesn't work... here's the blurb:

Quote
Arthroscopically assisted meniscal repairs have been described as inside-out, outside-in, and all-inside techniques. Henning[36,37] first described the inside-out technique of arthroscopic meniscal repair. Inside-out techniques utilize zone-specific cannulas to pass sutures through the joint and across the tear. The sutures are swaged onto flexible needles. A small posterior joint line incision is used to retrieve the sutures and tie directly on the capsule. The use of a posterior retractor, such as a gynecologic speculum, is vital in order to protect the posterior neurovascular structures.

The outside-in techniques have been described by Warren[32] and Morgan and Casscells.[34] Outside-in techniques involve passing sutures percutaneously through spinal needles at the joint line across the tear, and then retrieving the sutures intra-articularly. Mulberry knots can then be tied on the intra-articular free ends of the suture. A small incision is then made at the joint line, where the protruding suture ends are retrieved and tied directly on the capsule. An alternative technique is to retrieve the intra-articular portion of the suture with another pass across the tear using a wire snare and tying the suture back on itself on the capsule. This technique eliminates the need for Mulberry knots. A potential disadvantage of the outside-in technique is difficulty in reducing the tear and opposing the edges while passing the sutures.

The all-inside technique was traditionally used to perform repairs of the far posterior horns, where a posterior accessory portal is used, along with passing a suture with a suture hook device.[40,41] The suture would then be tied intra-articularly. More recently, technologic advances have brought about a number of implantable anchors, arrows, screws, and staples that facilitate meniscal repair without the need for accessory incisions or portals. These devices can be found of permanent, as well as absorbable materials. Although the pullout strength of some of these devices has been shown to approximate those of mattress sutures in cadaveric studies,[42,43] there have been no long-term clinical studies that compare them to more traditional repair techniques (Figure 13).
R knee symptoms 2003
Feb 06: MRI extensive complex tear/shredded R medial meniscus
Aug 06: NHS offer removal of most of meniscus
Oct 06: Partial meniscectomy, plica resection and CMI in Germany
Mar 2008: R CMI failure
L knee symptoms 2006
Mar 2008: cartilage defect patella, pes anserine bursa















support