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Author Topic: Procedure to straighted lower leg  (Read 1747 times)

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Offline Big_D

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Procedure to straighted lower leg
« on: June 03, 2003, 02:48:21 AM »
I am 47 years old Male. I have had 2 knee surgeries in the past on my right knee. When I walk I have noticed that my lower right leg bows out and after some time the leg becomes painful from the knee down to my heel. I was talking with a lady that has had a procedure where they break the bones in her lower leg, add some wires for tracking and straighten out the lower leg. She said the procedure should be good for at least 10 years. First of all what is the procedure called? Is it succesful and recommended? She said she had tried braces which did not keep the lower leg from bowing out. Any info you have on this would be appreciated.

Offline katie

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Re: Procedure to straighted lower leg
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2003, 01:37:27 PM »
It's probably some variant on "osteotomy", possibly "tibial osteotomy", but I don't really know specifically.

However; I do have the same sort of problem. My knee is bowing outwards when I walk; not enough that I noticed it, but my physiotherapist did while I was on the treadmill thing.

He reckons in my case it's caused by a shortened calf muscle - I was on crutches for a while round having surgery on my knee, and we think it's never regained original range of motion after that. So I've been doing muscle stretching exercises.

You might want to talk to a physio and see if there's a nice simple[1] fix before worrying about having bones fiddled with...



[1] In the sense of being "five minutes work every day for a while", rather than the magic wand sense....
I'm a grouchy software engineer with a sore knee. And I'm bad in the mornings. And I haven't had enough coffee. What was it you wanted doing again?

Offline The KNEEguru

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Re: Procedure to straighted lower leg
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2003, 05:37:26 PM »
Hi
You need to differentiate between the knee being bowed "all the time" or being thrust outwards "with each step".  The former is called a 'varus deformity' and the latter is called 'lateral thrusting'. Lateral thrusting is usually due to a lack of the medial meniscus, where the lateral meniscus and musculature of the leg correct the deformity until weight is put on the leg, when the joint collapses on the inner side and thrusts to the outer side.  In varus deformity, the deformity is often due also to a lack of a medial meniscus, but the compensatory forces are absent. There are other causes.
Operation to correct a lateral thrust is often an osteotomy  - eg. high tibial osteotomy - where a wedge is taken out of the tibia on the lateral side to alter the stresses. A unispacer may also be advised in some centres, but this is new. If there is question of the bowing being due to some other reason, and there is a rotory element, eg the tibia or femur is rotated, a more complex limb realignment procedure may be recommended, using an Ilizarov frame.
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Offline Big_D

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Re: Procedure to straighted lower leg
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2003, 10:42:35 PM »
The description you gave of Lateral thrusting sounds like my condition. You sound very informed on the subject. Are you a fellow knee sufferer or do you have some medical qualifications? I had my first knee surgery to remove some torn cartlidge. When this was done is this some of the medail meniscus or lack of it that could be causing my problems? Is the operation to correct the lateral thrust a difficult procedure? Is recovery time short? What other options do I have?

Offline The KNEEguru

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Re: Procedure to straighted lower leg
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2003, 10:55:04 PM »
I am a doctor and spent 15 years in a specialist knee clinic, working in close association with several knee surgeons, although I was involved in management and education rather than with patients.
The lateral thrust from an absent meniscus is a sudden bowing of the leg as you transfer weight onto it while walking, and is more obvious to someone observing from behind than it may be to the patient.
It is a bad sign, inasmuch as the knee is clearly taking stress and arthritis may ensue. But if there is not yet joint surface damage there may be time to alter the joint forces to stop or delay progression.
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Offline The KNEEguru

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