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Author Topic: ARIF, ORIF, and CREF  (Read 5306 times)

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Offline meg

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ARIF, ORIF, and CREF
« on: June 01, 2003, 01:54:38 AM »
Can someone explain what the "Reduction" means in these terms?
Arthroscopic Reduction Internal Fixator
Operative Reduction Internal Fixator
Closed Reduction Externnal Fixator

I'm not even sure what internal and external mean for sure.

THANKS

Meg
5/4/02 struck by drunk driver. bilateral tibial plateau fractures. 10/02 scope for scar tissue, bad ROM  2/03 repeat procedure. still lousy ROM in right knee.

Offline Heather M.

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Re: ARIF, ORIF, and CREF
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2003, 02:24:38 AM »
Reduction has to do with a broken bone or fracture--I think it means realigning the broken bits so they can heal.  Once that has been done, you need something to hold the fixed break while your bone heals itself, which is a fixator.  Internal is just that--inside your body.  It involves screws, darts, metal plates, etc.  An external fixator is a big metal frame that goes around the leg and has pieces of it going into your flesh/bone to hold it in place.  It involves more risk of infection and inconvenience for the patient, but also can give a better chance for those who haven't responded well to internal screws.

Here's a link which shows Lyle Lovett and his external fixator for a broken leg.  
http://www.uthouston.edu/hLeader/archive/orthopedic/020329/

Your leg goes in the middle of the cylinder.  I think Larry on this board has one right now.

As for the rest, I'm going to guess here based on the individual definitions:  arthroscopic reduction Internal fixator would be repairing the fracture with a scope and internal screws/plates.  Operative reduction with internal fixator would be an open procedure (big scar) with screws/plates inside the leg.  A closed reduction with an external fixator would involve no surgery, I'm guessing, but would involve small incisions to place the external fixator on and give your bone a chance to heal.

Remember, I'm just guessing, because I've had arthroscopic and closed procedures done before.  
« Last Edit: June 01, 2003, 02:25:44 AM by hmaxwell »
Scope #1: LR, part. menisectomy w/cyst, chondroplasty
#2-#5: Lysis of adhesions/scar tissue, AIR, patellar tendon debridement, infections, MUA, insufflation
#6: IT band release / Z-Plasty, synovectomy, LOA/AIR, chondroplasty
2006 Arthrofibrosis, patella baja
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hmaxwell

Offline meg

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Re: ARIF, ORIF, and CREF
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2003, 03:09:25 AM »
thanks, heather. that seems about what I thought. I think I was reading the article/link you posted on --drawn a blank--and these terms were thrown around.

I'm not sure where I am in this because I had open reduction, screws, and then a plaster cast for tibeau plateau fracture, and torn ACL.  My second (arrogant) opinion doctor (1 year later) said my athrofibrosis problems are all due to the plaster cast.  (I know, immobilization is bad...). I know I can't dwell on the past, but it is possible that my OS did have a good reason for his decision.      :(      :-/ :'(     There was one small statement in the article that said occasionally a cast is necessary.
Well, we can only go forward, eh?  I know you've had your share of troubles.

thanks for your reply.  meg
5/4/02 struck by drunk driver. bilateral tibial plateau fractures. 10/02 scope for scar tissue, bad ROM  2/03 repeat procedure. still lousy ROM in right knee.

Offline meg

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Re: ARIF, ORIF, and CREF
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2003, 03:14:18 AM »
By the way, Heather, by husband, who was also struck by the drunk driver and broke both of HIS legs, had an external fixture, (very creepy things!) so my doctor can't be completely clueless.  

Re bilateral TPFs.  Since I broke both knees, somehow I thought that's what the bilateral meant (both legs),  but I guess it must mean both legs with LATERAL TPFs.   So much to understand.    meg
5/4/02 struck by drunk driver. bilateral tibial plateau fractures. 10/02 scope for scar tissue, bad ROM  2/03 repeat procedure. still lousy ROM in right knee.















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