Advertisement - Hide this advert





Author Topic: Patellar tendonitis surgery  (Read 62386 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline knee2no

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 125
  • Liked: 0
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #15 on: May 09, 2012, 03:49:03 PM »
I was directing comments to ALRUNNER who mentioned surgery for patellar tendonitis.† I was not aware of a surgery that specifically addresses "PATELLAR TENDONITIS" only.

 
Original poster who posted in 2005 is long gone,† stated he had his surgery that year and hasnt posted since. Sounds like he had a good result otherwise we would be hearing from him.†
I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon's knife or the chemist's drug.

I will not be ashamed to say "I know not", nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed.

Offline aaa

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 392
  • Liked: 1
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #16 on: May 09, 2012, 06:56:00 PM »
YB

Who stated that a lateral release is a treatment for patellar tendonitis?



Nobody on this thread.  Although some surgeons will try to link weakness of quadriceps due to possible maltracking of the kneecap. i.e. if you can't use the knee properly, the quads will weaken. Weakness of quads can then lead to the tendinitis.

An LR does little to 'wake up' the quads, it usually has the opposite affect in a lot of cases.

Offline captainruss

  • SuperKNEEgeek
  • *****
  • Posts: 675
  • Liked: 9
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2012, 04:36:22 PM »
The list of conditions a LR is appropriate for is probably shorter and easier to list than the list of complications the Lateral Release causes when used for the wrong condition or as an incorrect diagnosis.  As a less intrusive surgery the Lateral Release seems like it is recommended quite a bit.  I was almost in agreement with having one recommended for my daughter.  It was not the correct diagnosis and could have been a very serious mistake.

Russ
80 Shattered patella 5 surg
09† TKR†
09† MUA
09† MUA
09† Knee infected??
10† TKR† Scar Tissue
10† 2nd OS† Diagnosis Infection
10† TKR with antibiotic spacer, no joint
4/11† TKR
11† TKR PT
11† TKR
11† TKR† AF diagosis
12/11† HO diagnosed
2012† Intractable Pain
2012† OS split
amputation possible?

Offline allyd

  • SuperKNEEgeek
  • *****
  • Posts: 678
  • Liked: 34
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2012, 06:50:07 PM »
How is it that any thread with the term "patella" turns into a "Don't get a Lateral Release!!!" thread?
04/09 RK - Dislocated Patella & Grade III MCL Tear
06/10 RK - Re-Dislocation Patella
09/11 RK - MPFLr + Lateral Lengthening

Offline captainruss

  • SuperKNEEgeek
  • *****
  • Posts: 675
  • Liked: 9
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2012, 07:41:28 PM »
The original post in 2005 was talking about his OS not recommending a LR for PT and maltracking issues. 
80 Shattered patella 5 surg
09† TKR†
09† MUA
09† MUA
09† Knee infected??
10† TKR† Scar Tissue
10† 2nd OS† Diagnosis Infection
10† TKR with antibiotic spacer, no joint
4/11† TKR
11† TKR PT
11† TKR
11† TKR† AF diagosis
12/11† HO diagnosed
2012† Intractable Pain
2012† OS split
amputation possible?

Offline ALRunner

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 78
  • Liked: 1
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2012, 02:49:24 PM »
I used to be located in Alabama...

I think of all the things I could do before and the few things I had to give up.† Well, now I can't do anything but sit here with my legs numb with pain shooting up them typing because I can't walk on it anymore today.† Yes...volleyball is important to you...or running is important to you.† What about simply being able to go to work and support yourself?† More important or less important?† What about being able to simply walk with your kids...not run..just walk?† More important or less important.

Chances are you may have a very successful surgery.† Just make sure it is the first/best/only alternative.

Russ
This is absolute golden wisdom here and I mean it. It is the human condition to take for granted what we have. We always want more. And yet our lives are at all times a house of cards. My situation is not on the same level as yours, but my knee pain has taught me that the essential ability to be ambulatory without pain is something most people have and just don't appreciate. When my knee pain first came on I wanted to be able to run. And so I did, and it become a permanent condition. Now my only goal is to return back to what I used to have (no running, but no pain). That seems now a lofty goal. "You don't know what you got till you lose".

It seems dare I say hilariously stupid for a non-professional athlete to opt for a risky surgery merely so they can continue in whatever sport they happen to like. It shows an obvious excess in how vested they are in their activity and they've convinced themselves it's so damn important that without it they lose their sense of self and life will be worth less. And yet most people don't give a crap about volleyball, most don't care about running, etc. and still have meaningful lives.

It is sacrosanct and beyond doubt that if the only reason you're looking to get surgery is to continue in some sport you happen to like you need to stop the sport, not do the surgery.
Quote
It was not the correct diagnosis and could have been a very serious mistake.
Before I had the "wisdom" I have now I came very close to surgery. The surgeon I saw was pretty confident that my patella tendon pain was instead a satellite pain the result of a torn meniscus. A previous MRI had shown a partial tear of the meniscus and this surgeon had a previous patient with conditions similar to mine (also a runner) resolved with surgery. I thought what the heck let's do it. However, I thought why not get an MRI first, so that's what I asked for--me, not the surgeon--I got the MRI and then he changed his tune and became sure that the meniscus tear was not related (nor do I ever think it was in retrospect). I came very close to surgery to correct the wrong thing so that I could engage in an activity I now don't even care about.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2012, 02:53:09 PM by ALRunner »

Offline allyd

  • SuperKNEEgeek
  • *****
  • Posts: 678
  • Liked: 34
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2012, 04:48:57 PM »
It seems dare I say hilariously stupid for a non-professional athlete to opt for a risky surgery merely so they can continue in whatever sport they happen to like. It shows an obvious excess in how vested they are in their activity and they've convinced themselves it's so damn important that without it they lose their sense of self and life will be worth less. And yet most people don't give a crap about volleyball, most don't care about running, etc. and still have meaningful lives.

It is sacrosanct and beyond doubt that if the only reason you're looking to get surgery is to continue in some sport you happen to like you need to stop the sport, not do the surgery.
This may be a correct option for some depending on their condition and options. Definitely not an end all approach to knee issues. Just because weíre not all professional athletes doesnít mean options arenít worth pursuing to regain certain activities.

I am someone who opted for a major surgery to simply regain activities that I love. Iím not a professional athlete, and do not have visions of glory - but I wasnít ready to quit. It was important to me. There are people out there who donít give a crap about volleyball per seĖ but I do care, its that simple. My life wonít lose meaning without, but it was important that I try when given a viable option to correct. I struggle to understand why this is hilariously stupid.

Having realistic expectations/goals regarding a procedure and an understanding of the risks is important before pursuing Ė After that, we will all have different motivations that should not be questioned by our peers.
04/09 RK - Dislocated Patella & Grade III MCL Tear
06/10 RK - Re-Dislocation Patella
09/11 RK - MPFLr + Lateral Lengthening

Offline ALRunner

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 78
  • Liked: 1
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2012, 04:58:44 PM »
It seems dare I say hilariously stupid for a non-professional athlete to opt for a risky surgery merely so they can continue in whatever sport they happen to like. It shows an obvious excess in how vested they are in their activity and they've convinced themselves it's so damn important that without it they lose their sense of self and life will be worth less. And yet most people don't give a crap about volleyball, most don't care about running, etc. and still have meaningful lives.

It is sacrosanct and beyond doubt that if the only reason you're looking to get surgery is to continue in some sport you happen to like you need to stop the sport, not do the surgery.
This may be a correct option for some depending on their condition and options. Definitely not an end all approach to knee issues. Just because weíre not all professional athletes doesnít mean options arenít worth pursuing to regain certain activities.

I am someone who opted for a major surgery to simply regain activities that I love. Iím not a professional athlete, and do not have visions of glory - but I wasnít ready to quit. It was important to me. There are people out there who donít give a crap about volleyball per seĖ but I do care, its that simple. My life wonít lose meaning without, but it was important that I try when given a viable option to correct. I struggle to understand why this is hilariously stupid.

Having realistic expectations/goals regarding a procedure and an understanding of the risks is important before pursuing Ė After that, we will all have different motivations that should not be questioned by our peers.

It's a bad idea because the realistic expectations would tell a realistic person not to undertake the risk. I think we should be questioned by peers because they challenge our reality. Perhaps a reasonable doubt we've been tucking away and trying to ignore is ripped wide open and we change our view.

I have just read of too many freaking people, myself included, who didn't stop when we should have. This is wisdom often imparted and often ignored. I pride myself on taking advice from people qualified to offer it, and in most of my life I do. I never stopped running even as I ran my tendon apart because virtually nobody told me to stop. When the pain came on early on in my endeavor I started researching it and talked to people about it as well. I then saw a doctor and even she never said "You know, you really should stop running for a while and truly respect this problem." I was never told that. I saw another doctor a year later and my symptoms were more severe and still he never urged this either.

You may wonder why I didn't just see the forest for the trees and stop myself. Well, I did to a degree, but still everything I read online spoke of my condition as something temporary. I never once thought, nor had even read of those who had created a permanent problem. Eventually I stumbled upon the correct search terms, found that my condition was a chronic one, and realized what I had done.

I often caution people severely against continuing to destroy their joints because I speak from some experience. It just isn't worth it. I loved running, loved competing in triathlons. I loved them far less than the idea of being able to sit in a chair for a few hours without knee pain, though.

Looking at your signature I dearly hope you've stopped any jumping sports, but it doesn't like you have. You will regret this when you're older. Long after the love of your sport has gone you'll be kept with the scars. What we do now impacts our future.

Most of us (regular people) will end up with some joint problems when we get old. I'm frankly hoping that if I have increased the likelihood of osteroarthritis (and I probably have given some new crepitus under my knee cap) that by the time I actually feel any pain from that, some years down the line, there are new treatments.

It is also difficult to admit that we are broken in some way, that what we want will never happen for us. You see a person going for a run on a nice day, you want to be there. It's just a hand we're dealt. For most of us it could be worse, even joint pain is better than a terminal illness, so when I focus on what I have, not what I don't, it helps show me how trivial a particular activity is really.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2012, 05:02:04 PM by ALRunner »

Offline allyd

  • SuperKNEEgeek
  • *****
  • Posts: 678
  • Liked: 34
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #23 on: June 12, 2012, 07:14:54 PM »
Orthopedics helps the casual athlete and weekend warriors all the time. And these people have as much a right to pursue their hobby as the professional athlete. Iíll say it again, it is not stupid in every situation Ė orthopedic surgery should not be reserved for the professional athlete, or just those looking to regain simple, daily tasks that the majority of us take for granted.

Our conditions, options, and goals vary from each individual.  What is right for one, may not be for another. Iíll agree itís the responsibility of the OS to help assess the goals/options and help you understand what is a realistic outcome. Itís fair to question whether peers understand the risks, rewards, options, for surgery, but if they do Ė why they decide to move forward is an individual choice, and they need not be ridiculed as if they made a stupid decision.

No, I havenít given up on jumping sports, because with my surgery Ė my knee is stable, stronger, and I no longer have to. We have different conditions, and my point which maybe wasn't clear is that there is not a catch-all decision making approach that covers each individual knee, condition and person. When things go wrong, (i.e. the person who should have quit while their ahead) hindsight is always better than foresight. Hindsight should not shape catch-all statements such as "It is sacrosanct and beyond doubt that if the only reason you're looking to get surgery is to continue in some sport you happen to like you need to stop the sport, not do the surgery."
04/09 RK - Dislocated Patella & Grade III MCL Tear
06/10 RK - Re-Dislocation Patella
09/11 RK - MPFLr + Lateral Lengthening

Offline ALRunner

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 78
  • Liked: 1
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #24 on: June 12, 2012, 08:43:05 PM »
OK maybe not QUITE sacrosanct :D

Offline socogirl76

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • Liked: 0
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #25 on: August 03, 2012, 02:29:19 PM »
Here is my story... febuary 2011 I had a fulkerson done with a lateral release done.  Since then its been one big roller coaster.  I have such BAD tendonitus now its not even funny.  I have been going back to the dr every  2 weeks because its gotten that bad.  I started PT again and wearing a brace and have to walk with a cane again.  Pain patches have become part of my daily routine.  Anyone going through this or went through this? It gets to the point it hurts to walk. Any reccomend.  will be much appriciated.

Offline knee2no

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 125
  • Liked: 0
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #26 on: August 03, 2012, 07:51:47 PM »
Did you have MRI confirmation of tendonitis and do you show a thickened patellar tendon?† Is your pain located at top of patellar tendon and bottom of kneecap?† Why did you have fulkerson?†† Other than pain, do you have any restricted movement?
I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon's knife or the chemist's drug.

I will not be ashamed to say "I know not", nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed.

Offline socogirl76

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 9
  • Liked: 0
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2012, 05:00:24 PM »
I havent had an MRI yet.  I had the fulkerson due to maltracking and dislocation also.  My kneecap was running more than 50% out of track.  My pain is located on the bottom of the kneecap on both sides also .  I also may have nerve damage now, I still havent gotten full feeling back in the area also.  Too boot I also had celulitus in this leg also before the removed the hardware...

Offline Clarkey

  • SuperKNEEgeek
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 4188
  • Liked: 75
  • Neil TheElephant knee packed up carrying his trunk
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2016, 06:36:31 PM »
I appreciate that this topic last reply was nearly 4 years ago, I have chosen to re-start this topic once again as I have struggled to find any posts regarding patella tendon surgery. After carefully reading through what everyone opinions are I seem to be the small minority that cannot accept defeat being told to live and cope with chronic patella tendonitis!

I class myself still young aged 37, I cannot accept that I may never be able to run again during my lifetime. I know there are others worse off than me that have had leg amputations that been caused by a car accident or during a war conflict. These are just examples, they can have artificial limbs fitted and are able to take part in sporting activities once again.

Those that follow my post op dairy already know my RK history, you can see on my signature what I have had done so far. I am waiting to see if ESWT will be beneficial or not, that still very new to the UK, there are very few clinics and hospitals that provide ESWT. I am lucky that my local NHS orthopaedic hospital provide electrical shock wave therapy sessions for patella tendonitis problems.   

I personally cannot admit defeat so easily, I am very much a gambler and risk taker I will do anything might get back into long distance running once again. Patella tendon decompression surgery has been suggested as the last option if ESWT failed to start the healing process of chronic patella tendonitis. 

I want to fulfil my dream job in helping and supporting young people with additional needs. My right knee injury is hindering me and possibly stopping me from being employed. My walking pace has slowed right down that it clear to see that I am limping around making me feel more self-conscious about myself.

Having Aspergerís make me narrow minded and focused, making it harder for me to accept that I will never be able to run again! Nowadays with modern medicine there must be something that can be done rather than being told to live with the way my right knee is.

If ESWT works, I can hopefully get back into running again long distances. If it fails and does not improve my patella tendonitis and turn down to have patella tendon decompression surgery, it would always be niggling me why I never decided to take the risk and gamble. There is a 50/50 percentage chance of a success or failure. I personally feel it a risk worth taking, I know from reading the previous posts that some members would disagree with my decision.

'Inferior patella accessory pole excision decompression surgery' is the exact term used, members on KG might have more in depth knowledge about this type of surgery, may even have had this procedure done?

My post-op diary link.

http://www.kneeguru.co.uk/KNEEtalk/index.php?topic=43471.1410

[email protected]
RK: PFPS, Arthrofibrosis, Tendinopathy, Five cortisone injections
16/01/18 Anterior interval release, distal patella excision, lateral meniscal repair
18/07/14 Anterior interval release  
16/11/09 Medial plica excision, fat pad trimming

Offline aali1221

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 4
  • Liked: 0
Re: Patellar tendonitis surgery
« Reply #29 on: November 19, 2016, 05:35:07 PM »
I have had patella tendonitis for about a year and a half in my right knee. Sometimes it flares up real bad if I take a bad landing or bad jump mechanic when playing basketball and its hard to put pressure on my right leg. other then that its fine if i stretch, workout and ice. The problem is I want to play more and as much as I can now that I have free time and trying to lose weight at 5'9 250lb.

Has anyone ever tried platelet rich plasma treatment? Or went through a whole eccentric focused training to strengthen the tendon? Or even supplements like proline/lysine coupled with vitamin c and magnesium?  Any progress or results from these methods of treating patella tendonitis?















support