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Author Topic: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?  (Read 469455 times)

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Offline Tanya8

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #705 on: September 12, 2009, 05:13:02 AM »
Hi Kano358---

I'm so sorry to hear about your terrible accident and the resultant problems with your foot---just to sum up my situation, I had foot drop from a broken leg, had nerve release surgery, and now can walk without a brace. This whole thing has been going on for a couple of years, and it's been anything but fun---I know what you're going through, but believe me, things will get better in time. Although I have recovered enough to ditch the brace, I wouldn't say things are perfect, and I still hope for continued improvement. I also know how awful those horrible plastic AFOs are---I used to have to wear two different size shoes just to fit into everything, and even with all of this, the plastic brace was still torture. I complained so much that my physiotherapist sent me to another prosthetic service, and the technician there fitted me with a Walk-on Brace by Otto Bock. It's made out of carbon and is light and flexible, but very supportive---you can call around in your area to the various prosthetic services and find out who carries it---you can also look them up on the Internet---it made a tremendous difference to me during my recuperation period, and maybe it will help you to. It was also great not to have all that pain that I experienced with the plastic variety. I hope this info helps you just a little bit and also that you make a full recovery in time. As for the "dragons" I had those horrible pains too, but with time they have diminished as well. If you have any further questions just post and I'll try to answer them---take care!

Offline AmandaC

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #706 on: September 22, 2009, 07:24:54 AM »
Hi Kano358
From my experience and advise from doctors nerve pain can be a positive and a negative thing.  It can be a sign of the nerve regenerating and it can also be caused by the damaged nerve still having some signals going through but not working.  I had serious nerve pain but it turned out my sciatic nerve was trapped in plates and pins in my hip.  I wear a splint called a toe of it is made out of some kind of carbon material it is better than the plastic ones but I still hate. 
Foot drop is a terrible thing but we can live a pretty good life still and ther is still hope
Amanda

Offline kano358

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #707 on: September 29, 2009, 04:30:13 PM »
Tanya and Amanda thank you so much for the advice. Tanya I'm glad to hear you have improvement. Amanda, it's a little weird i think about you everyday and what you been through and i try to imagine you running around chasing your children. I even made a whole image of you and my heart breaks so much for you. You give me strength though lots of it and just the thought of you getting back on your horse makes me want to go run a marathon. Thank you so much ! P.S. i actually travel to New Zealand a lot my comapny does buisness with a company out there called Fonterra. I won;t be able to travel there for a very long time

Offline AmandaC

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #708 on: October 03, 2009, 08:07:28 AM »
Kano358, I work for a company that does contracts to Fonterra, I do all the accounts and office work its such a small world really.  Never give up home things will improve and yes foot drop can be debilitating and stop you from doing some things but we can still live a good full life, we have to be happy for what we have not what we have lost.  In time it will get easier but never give up hope it is early days yet and you still have heaps of healing to do.
Amanda

Offline oldestman

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #709 on: October 07, 2009, 05:50:40 AM »
Hi all - I am new to this thread but have been following since I broke my femur in an accident in Feb 2009. I am 28 and my femur was broken and caused damage to my sciatic nerve damaging both the peroneal and tibial nerve. 3 months post accident they did a nerve exploration on the sciatic nerve only to find my nerve was tethered by scar tissue and so they freed it. Since then my tibial nerve has recovered nicely and is almost 100% but unfortunately the peroneal still has not and I have full foot drop.

I can move all of my toes a little but not up and the side of my leg is getting less numb but the top of my foot is pretty dead. After 8 months most of my Drs say I need a few more months for the peroneal nerve to grow back to the muscle activators on my leg and hopefully start to see some recovery. I see many on this board talking about recovery of function much past 1 year but I was told the muscles will start to die after 12 months and regardless if the nerve grows the muscles won't work again. How are you all preventing that problem?

Also I met with one of the top Drs in the US for peroneal nerve surgery and he suggested we decompress my nerve at the top of my tibia below the knee to ensure it doesn't get entrapped while it is regrowing. My other and original nerve/plastic surgeon noted there was no reason to believe it would become entrapped there and the surgery was unnecessary. The new Dr said it may not help but wouldn't hurt...any thoughts? Surgery for surgery sake seems weird but the slim chance it could help is enticing me - while my first dr says it will just add another scar to my leg.

Mom444 your posts are very encouraging and have helped me the last 8 months. To be honest, all the recovery I am hoping for is for movement enough to wear flip flops at the beach again. Thanks for listening.

Offline mom444

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #710 on: October 07, 2009, 03:42:24 PM »
Hi all - I am new to this thread but have been following since I broke my femur in an accident in Feb 2009. I am 28 and my femur was broken and caused damage to my sciatic nerve damaging both the peroneal and tibial nerve. 3 months post accident they did a nerve exploration on the sciatic nerve only to find my nerve was tethered by scar tissue and so they freed it. Since then my tibial nerve has recovered nicely and is almost 100% but unfortunately the peroneal still has not and I have full foot drop.

I can move all of my toes a little but not up and the side of my leg is getting less numb but the top of my foot is pretty dead. After 8 months most of my Drs say I need a few more months for the peroneal nerve to grow back to the muscle activators on my leg and hopefully start to see some recovery. I see many on this board talking about recovery of function much past 1 year but I was told the muscles will start to die after 12 months and regardless if the nerve grows the muscles won't work again. How are you all preventing that problem?

Also I met with one of the top Drs in the US for peroneal nerve surgery and he suggested we decompress my nerve at the top of my tibia below the knee to ensure it doesn't get entrapped while it is regrowing. My other and original nerve/plastic surgeon noted there was no reason to believe it would become entrapped there and the surgery was unnecessary. The new Dr said it may not help but wouldn't hurt...any thoughts? Surgery for surgery sake seems weird but the slim chance it could help is enticing me - while my first dr says it will just add another scar to my leg.

Mom444 your posts are very encouraging and have helped me the last 8 months. To be honest, all the recovery I am hoping for is for movement enough to wear flip flops at the beach again. Thanks for listening.

Hello and welcome to the board!  I hope things get better for you.  We are still hoping for more improvement with her.  It is now over three years since her decompression surgery, which she had approximately 18 months after the nerve injury we estimate.  (Remember the injury was unexplained and her condition was misdiagnosed for some time.)  We still do overnight threshold electrical stimulation (TES) and surface triggered EMG therapy.  Still not complete dorsiflexion but some movement and definite muscle contractions-- just not enough to lift the foot-- yet we hope.

My daughter is now six years old and very active and social despite her ailment.  We enrolled her in a "hip hop" style dance class through community ed, which is great  because it's low pressure and she can wear her brace and her normal clothes and still have fun.  Right now I'm a little concerned about putting her in sports or in any more stressful or disciplined dance...  But one day at a time. 

Please keep this thread alive everyone!
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline Tanya8

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #711 on: October 09, 2009, 04:30:52 AM »
Hi all - I am new to this thread but have been following since I broke my femur in an accident in Feb 2009. I am 28 and my femur was broken and caused damage to my sciatic nerve damaging both the peroneal and tibial nerve. 3 months post accident they did a nerve exploration on the sciatic nerve only to find my nerve was tethered by scar tissue and so they freed it. Since then my tibial nerve has recovered nicely and is almost 100% but unfortunately the peroneal still has not and I have full foot drop.

I can move all of my toes a little but not up and the side of my leg is getting less numb but the top of my foot is pretty dead. After 8 months most of my Drs say I need a few more months for the peroneal nerve to grow back to the muscle activators on my leg and hopefully start to see some recovery. I see many on this board talking about recovery of function much past 1 year but I was told the muscles will start to die after 12 months and regardless if the nerve grows the muscles won't work again. How are you all preventing that problem?

Also I met with one of the top Drs in the US for peroneal nerve surgery and he suggested we decompress my nerve at the top of my tibia below the knee to ensure it doesn't get entrapped while it is regrowing. My other and original nerve/plastic surgeon noted there was no reason to believe it would become entrapped there and the surgery was unnecessary. The new Dr said it may not help but wouldn't hurt...any thoughts? Surgery for surgery sake seems weird but the slim chance it could help is enticing me - while my first dr says it will just add another scar to my leg.

Mom444 your posts are very encouraging and have helped me the last 8 months. To be honest, all the recovery I am hoping for is for movement enough to wear flip flops at the beach again. Thanks for listening.

Hi oldestman---welcome to the forum, and I hope you find it as helpful as I have since I broke my femur bone and landed up with drop foot too. You ask a lot of difficult questions, and I’ll try to give you my thoughts on a few of them. I had nerve release surgery at 7 months and was told that healing would continue for another 2 to 3 years. I think if all communication is lost between the nerve and the muscles for longer than 12 months or whatever time, the muscles as well as the nerve will start to die. However, if some communication is established before this time, this is enough to keep the muscles and nerves alive for more eventual healing. It has seemed to work this way with me.

As for the plastic surgeon vs. the neurosurgeon, how can anyone know that there is no compression below the knee without going in there surgically and taking a look? EMG testing sort of works by the process of elimination. It sort of goes like this…the problem is not at the spine, the problem is not at the upper thigh, so therefore the problem must be at the knee. Although you did have successful surgery of the sciatic nerve, how does anyone know there is not another problem at the peroneal branch of this nerve? My fracture was in the thigh area, and yet the neurological problem was below the knee????  If there is a problem and it is released, you will probably stand a good chance to regain a lot of function. If nothing is found there, there is really little harm done, since this surgery is a small one and done on an ambulatory basis---in and out on the same day. By the way, the scar almost disappears after a year.

If you were lucky enough to see “one of the top Drs in the US for peroneal nerve surgery,” I would be very inclined to take his advice. Plastic surgeons do fill a gap, but it was a neurosurgeon who got to the bottom of my drop foot issues.  The best of luck to you whatever you decide, and let us know how you are doing---Tanya

Offline oldestman

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #712 on: October 15, 2009, 04:49:08 AM »
Tanya- Thanks for your response. I think your comments about the muscle and nerve are text book from what I have heard as well. It can be a little longer/shorter than a year. The length my nerve needs to regrow is right around the 1yr mark to hit the muscle activators, so I am told. So hopefully I get even some flicker this winter before it is too late. At this point I was told EMGs are pretty much worthless until I see/feel some change in my lower leg. Essentially they don't need to stick me with needles to know the peroneal nerve isn't working right.

My initial nerve/plastic surgeon doesn't see why there would be any entrapment/compression of the peroneal branch below the knee because there wasn't any before. My second opinion peroneal specialist said there could be a problem when the nerve regrows but we won't really ever know and doing this will ensure there won't be a problem. My first surgeon said it probably won't hurt me and I'll just end up with another scar. But I am not entering any beauty contests, and as a guy who really cares anyway.  Since I am hoping for regrowth I won't have a release of pressure and all of a sudden function again but maybe it'll allow for easier/faster growth.

I am anxious to do anything possible to try for a full recovery so I am going to call and schedule the surgery tomorrow because of your encouragement. I am on month 8 so not much beyond where you were when you had it done. Both Drs said surgery is good to do by 9 months so I should be good on my recovery time line.  I'll let everyone know how it goes.


Offline Tanya8

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #713 on: October 22, 2009, 01:02:25 AM »
Oldestman---best of luck to you with your surgery, and I'm glad that any information I provided helped you come to a decision about this! From reading about peroneal neuropathy, I've found out that the passage of the nerve around the fibula of the knee is sort of a natural tight spot to begin with, and the reason we run into trouble with this nerve is because of this natural physiology common to everyone. There have even been cases of people getting drop foot by resting the side of their leg on the driver's door during long drives. I think that's why the nerve specialist wants to remove any obstacle, which could interfere with your best possible recovery. Also, even if you don't see some sort of flicker this winter, that doesn't mean that there is not some kind of flicker and communication going on---for a while, you may just not be able to see it! Also, you will know that you did everything you possibly could at the best possible time in order to get your nerve to heal.

FYI, my problem involved a tight compression of the peroneal nerve that eventually landed up choking the nerve and limiting function. After the nerve release, I didn't spring up and just have an instant cure either. I don't really think it happens like that---I noticed little things at first, like the color of my foot returning to a healthy pink from the sickly bluish black that was caused by the nerve compression. Next, I noticed that my big toe seemed a lot stronger as well---to walk without a brace, however, took 9 more months. Now more than a year has passed, and I've been told to expect healing for another 1-2 years!  I'm letting you know about all of this long healing process so you don't lose heart, and so you realize that this whole process needs a lot of patience, as well as excellent doctors. Take care, and we'll all be waiting to hear from you--Tanya

« Last Edit: October 22, 2009, 01:14:16 AM by Tanya8 »

Offline dillman

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #714 on: October 23, 2009, 03:07:00 AM »
Hello all.  i am brand new and this is my first post. I wanted to share my story because no one else seems to have what i have. 

I dont have a drop foot.  I can lift my foot slightly *dorsiflexion and can move my foot in and out, slightly.  So i do have movement but its limited movement and i haven't seen much improvement and fear about hitting a wall and having permanent damage to my ankle/foot.  I have not seen a neurologist yet but will soon to make sure the Peroneal nerve is not degenerating.  One thing i cant do is get my heel down when standing tall.  I am close but cant get it down.  I wear an ankle dynasplint to help stretch my achilles and help with the dorsiflexion.  I can walk in orthopedic tennis shoes pretty well and with a cane but in bare feet, forget it.  Can't come close to making the heel - toe motion.  I am improving so that is the positive news but it is very slow.  It has been 4 and half months since my accident and i was hit on the right side of my body -   broke my pelvis, femur, tibia, fibula, lost spleen and cracked ribs, and 2 collapsed lungs.  got hit by a drunk driver.  I had a ton of trauma and my right leg looked like a tree trunk for about 2 plus months.  So maybe i am being a bit hard on myself and need to be more patient.  Listening to everyone elses story makes me feel very lucky and most of the time i do feel really lucky, just lately i have been worried that my foot wont recover and reading all the stories kind of freaks me out.  I guess i am asking if anyone else has limited movement in their and did it get better?  I assume it will take a long time?  sometimes it feels like i have something blocking my foot from fully flexing upward and downward. like something is on the top of my ankle - where the ankle meets the leg and something is blocking my foot from going any higher?  when both feet are on the ground my left toes and ball of my left foot can raise above the floor easily but my right foot just lifts up a little, barely clearing the floor.  weird.  i have tingling in my right toes and ball of my right foot and calf area, but that is it.  doesnt hurt or burn, just tingles to the touch.  i have it good i know but was wondering if anyone else has similar "stuff" going on.  thanks for your time! 

Offline Snow1003

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #715 on: October 27, 2009, 07:10:13 PM »
Hello,

I am in such pain and have googled and googled and not found anything "encouraging" until I started reading this thread.

I have a left foot drop. I had a hip replacement surgery and woke up not being able to feel my foot or calf or part of my thigh. 

I can now feel the bottom of my foot, it is very sensitive to touch though. My toes feel like they are on fire, all of the time and I have spasms that hit me it is just so painful!

What does this all mean? When will the pain subside? I am going out of my mind, not being able to alleviate the pain and not being able to function.

I was told that there was swelling near the sciatica which then caused "damage" to the peroneal nerve.  I can move my big toe and move my foot to the side but cannot curl my toes or bring my foot up. I have a hard plastic brace that makes the pain worse.  I use a cane and sometimes just wear my sneakers w/o the brace. The brace feels so confining and my foot feels like I am walking over hot coals. It is awful.

I have had an EMG and nearly jumped off the table each time I was poked or jabbed.  I am taking Tylenol and Gabapentin. I don't sleep.

If anyone can offer any suggestions I would very much appreciate it!

Offline Debbie B

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #716 on: November 01, 2009, 12:33:41 AM »
I am new to this list too, but found it while searching for answers to my peroneal nerve injury.  In June of 2008 I had a really big, stupid dog crash me into a metal handrail on some stairs as well as on the concrete curbing.  Over the next few weeks, the leg became swollen and painful and I had pain that radiated down my tibia and fibula.  The orthopedic surgeon I saw sent me for an MRI, diagnosed me as having tibial periostitis and put me on voltaren.  A few days later, I lost about 50% of the dorsiflexion in my foot so back to the ortho surgeon who put me on prednisone.  A week later I was worse rather than better so I was sent in for a contrast MRI of the leg and back (to rule out a disc problem.)  The ortho surgeon decided I had anterior compartment syndrome and I had a fasciotomy done the next day.  Recovery was not fun - on cructhes for two weeks and lots of swelling in the leg that eventually resolved.  The peroneal nerve function steadily decreased and the pain in the limb steadily increased to the point that I had difficulty sleeping and walking.  By january I had no peroneal nerve function left.

While a drop foot sounds like a innocuous thing, it is not!  It is a major debilitating problem that affects pretty much everything you do.  Every time I went back to the ortho surgeon, he was angry, acted like I was doing this just to spite him.  He sent me in for physical therapy but my PT was so alarmed by the persistent swelling in the limb and the dysfunction that she asked me not to come back until I had clearance from the surgeon.  I was put on what turned out to be a woefully inadequate dose of gabapentin.  I was sent for an AFO which improved the mechanics of my walk but was so high arched that I could not wear it for more than 20 mintues it was so painful.  No way could I run in it or work in it.

After some research on my own, I decided I must have a peroneal nerve entrapment and asked the ortho surgeon who assured me that it was impossible and even if I did, nothing could be done for it.  I was told to give up my sporting activities and downsize my life, suck it up and use the AFO - which, by the way, he never bothered to look at.  I have a very flat foot and the Walk On AFO is very high arched.  The last time I saw him, he commented on how tired I looked and asked me if I had been busy with work.  I told him that my leg was so swollen and painful that I had difficulty sleeping so he offered me a prescription for Ambien.  That just infuriated me.

I began calling to get referrals to a neurologist for a real diagnosis.  The Mayo Clinic and Barrow Neurological Institue told me to send my medical records and they would evaluate them and contact me if they wanted to take on my case.  The first neurologist I saw congratulated me on being correct on the diagnosis but suggested I wait a year to see if I got better.  Next neurologist thought I had reflex sympathteic dystrophy and sent me for lumbar nerve blocks and put me on high doses of prednisone neither of which helped.  Due to the severe disability the drop foot caused, I found a different type of AFO called a Richie Brace and was referred to a foot surgeon to be fitted for the brace.  The foot surgeon looked at me for about 3 seconds and asked me why I had just not had my peroneal nerve decompressed - he knew exactly what was wrong.  I told him the ortho surgeon told me nothing could be done but he informed me that the nerve should be explored and there were several things that could be done to decrease the risk of it becoming trapped again.  After the entrapment was confirmed by two separate EMG/nerve conduction studies by a neurologist the foot surgeon recommended, I had a nerve decompression done on 5/20/2009 - over 11 months after the original injury.

It was outpatient surgery and took less than an hour, no pain involved.  I was on crutches for a week but within two days the swelling in the limb had resolved  and has never returned.  And I could lilft my toes (not the big toe though) off the ground.  Could not lift them much, but going from zero function it was a start.  Once the incision was healed I started friction massage to decrease the risk of the nerve becoming entrapped - at first that was brutal and made me nauseous but that resolved over a month.  I started physical therapy a month after surgery and they continued the friction massage as well as manipulation of the fibular head. 

I still go to PT, 3 mornings a week, two hours a session.  I have the massage, electrical stimulation of the muscles, and many different exercises for proprioception and strength.  I used the Richie brace for about 2.5 months after surgery but no longer use it.  The function is steadily improving, I can dorsiflex my foot and toes and am just starting to get some lift of the big toe.  I had a huge defect in my leg where the anterior tiibal muscle is due to the sever atrophy but the muscle is coming back and you can actually see the muscle and tendon working.  I have full eversion in the foot now.  In order to run, I tape my ankle at about 90 degrees over my shoe, but I can run again.  My entire leg is still weak, but working on that with PT too.  At this point both the foot surgeon and PT expect me to regain at least 95% of the function.

I am not much for lists, but I wanted to share my story to let you know that there is hope and there are doctors who will listen and know what is going on.  Due to the anatomy of the nerve, entrapment is much more common that most doctors realize.  My foot surgeon knew immediately and he did the nerve decompression.  While I am so relieved that I am finally getting my life back, I am still so angry with the ortho surgeon who basically just blew me off.

If you are not getting answers, keep pushing!  They really must have EMGs and nerve conduction studies to confirm the diagnosis and they can also determine if the nerve is intact.  Once decompressed, the nerve has to heal which can take 6-8 months.  Once the nerve heals it can send signals to the anterior tibial muscle again and that muscle has to "relearn" how to work and has to regain its mass and strength which can take a few years.  But if you have an entrapment like I did, you can get better with lots and lots of physical therapy.

Offline Tanya8

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #717 on: November 04, 2009, 05:32:59 AM »
Debbie B--

Thanks for sharing your road to recovery in such great detail. I'm sure that many readers on this bulletin board will find your suggestions most helpful.  Also, congratulations on your pro-active approach to healing, which is absolutely necessary in finding the proper medical care. As I read your post, however, I was struck by both the similarities and the differences in our approach to healing. Just to sum up my case, I had drop foot from a broken femur bone and underwent a successful decompression surgery by a neurosurgeon. It's been about 18 months now, and like you, I no longer wear a brace, can drive without difficulty, and I'm still noticing ongoing improvement.

Also, like you, I underwent intensive physical therapy aimed at strengthening dorsiflexion, but unlike you, I found that friction massage was both painful and somewhat harmful. After a couple of sessions, I noticed more pain and less function and was advised by my doctor to discontinue this form of treatment. Like you, I also wore an AFO, but I found the Richie brace impossible to fit in my shoes and uncomfortable. The Walk-On Carbon  Brace by Otto Bock was a much better fit for me, but I found it completely flat and had to wear an arch support with it--it seemed to have no arch support at all.

From reading everyone's posts on this forum, I think it's important to point out that there are many different roads to recovery. No two cases of drop foot are the same, and the valuable lessen to be learned is that everyone with drop foot must find treatments and AFOs that are comfortable and work for them.  What works well for one person, may be awful for another. Also , EMG (electromyography) and NCS (nerve conduction studies) should be done at about 4 months. If testing confirms that decompression will be helpful, it should be done optimally between 6 and 8 months.  If you wait too long to do a nerve decompression, chances for a full recovery are greatly decreased.
Best wishes for your continued recovery---Tanya



« Last Edit: November 04, 2009, 05:37:07 AM by Tanya8 »

Offline gregDAlaska

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #718 on: November 08, 2009, 09:19:45 AM »
Hi I have been reading this post for about a year now And I have finaly decided to write something. On march 31,2008 I was walking out of my house into the garage and missed 2 steps and dislocated my Knee. I want to the emergency room and told them I could not move my foot or feel it and I new somthing was also wrong with my knee. I had been sent there from an urgent care doctor that had told me that they could not find a pulse in my foot and that I needed to go to the emergency room and to get a mri or a cat scan. The er doc took an x-ray and sent me home telling me that I needed to see on orthopedic surgeun the next day. The next day I went to see my OS and he could not find a pulse so he sent me for a cat scan. Come to find out my popliteal artery was severed and I was rushed into emergency surgery, after the told me there would be a good chance I would possibly loose my leg. They were able to graft a vein from my left legg into my right and I t was succesful I still have my legg. I also had torn my acl,pcl,lcl,and strethed my peroneal nerve. Three weeks later I had Knee reconstruction and 19 months later I am still working on getting My knee back to normal but I dont know if it will ever be the same. I can walk but dont think I could run on it to save my life.I am also suffering from foot drop and that I think this is my #1 concern right now I have been talking with a neurosurgeon at the university of washington about a possible nerve release or nerve graft I just dont know what to do Has it been to long since my injury for it to work 19 months post injury. I also wonder If I should think about a tendon transfer instead.  My leg feels good in the morning but after noon it starts to ache and by the time I get home it hurts pretty bad. I wear an afo by otto bach and a compression stockin to keep the swelling down. Does any one know were to buy wide shoes that will accomodate a brace. all I want is to be able to wear normal shoes again with out a brace it is uncomfortable. I want to thank every body that posts on this site, I read almost every day to see if I can find out any info. you guys have really helped me get thru some hard times.  best wishes to all of you. 

Offline jcblank

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #719 on: November 10, 2009, 07:19:27 AM »
greg--- are you talking to dr kliot in seattle at u of w?  i have seen him and he says that surgery is possible as long as the muscle involved is still infact a muscle.  a emg can tell you that.  i too am from alaska.  you can find wide shoes at sports authority--unsure where you are from though.  if you ask at other places they too may have some to choose from.  you can send me a personal message if you need further info.
1995 menisectomy
9/06 menisectomy with resultant blood clot
6/07 meniscal transplant with peroneal nerve damage
12/07 peroneal nerve decompression















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