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Author Topic: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?  (Read 453280 times)

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Offline amdre

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #660 on: January 01, 2009, 06:45:35 PM »
HAPPY NEW YEAR EVERYONE....WISH YOU ALL THE BEST IN RECOVERY FOR THE NEW YEAR!!!!!!
Dislocated knee in a Football game
Damage: Posterolateral Compartment,MCL Partial,IT band Tear,Popliteus tear,Hamstring and Peroneal Nerve Damage (Foot Drop)

Reapired in Surgery: Posterolateral Compartment Sept 17th/05
Scope Nov 20th/05, ACL Recon Sept 26th/06

Offline sports06

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #661 on: January 17, 2009, 04:46:38 AM »
Hello!

I am SO glad I found this post. I am a college student who has had two peroneal nerve releases as well as on anterior tibilias hernia repair. I was injured during an athletics game several years ago. Since then I have had many ambulance rides, pain management treatmetns, hospitalizations, and surgeries. Currently I  am several months out from my latest surgery. This surgery has been a really tough one to recover from. I am still fighting footdrop. There is still some hope that the movement could come back, but no guarantees. I would love to hear from others who are going through similar things.

Offline mom444

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #662 on: January 20, 2009, 04:09:03 AM »
Hello!

I am SO glad I found this post. I am a college student who has had two peroneal nerve releases as well as on anterior tibilias hernia repair. I was injured during an athletics game several years ago. Since then I have had many ambulance rides, pain management treatmetns, hospitalizations, and surgeries. Currently I  am several months out from my latest surgery. This surgery has been a really tough one to recover from. I am still fighting footdrop. There is still some hope that the movement could come back, but no guarantees. I would love to hear from others who are going through similar things.

Welcome to the board and good luck with your recovery!
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline mtviso

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #663 on: January 21, 2009, 01:30:28 PM »
Hi Tanya!
I was in your situation with recovery last spring and I found a tremendous improvement for my daily activities from MBT-shoes. With those shoes my gait is almost normal and I am able to walk faster and longer. They even give me the feeling of a healthy person again! They look ugly and are expencive, but have made wonders at least for me.
10/06 plica resection, chondromalacia II LK
arthrofibrosis
09/07 sequestrated lumbar disc, peroneal nerve damage, foot drop
10/07 scar tissue removal LK

Offline Tanya8

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #664 on: January 24, 2009, 06:58:54 AM »
Hi Tanya!
I was in your situation with recovery last spring and I found a tremendous improvement for my daily activities from MBT-shoes. With those shoes my gait is almost normal and I am able to walk faster and longer. They even give me the feeling of a healthy person again! They look ugly and are expencive, but have made wonders at least for me.

Hi there mtviso,

Thanks so much for the information about the MBT shoes. I've continued to make progress and have been able to ditch all the braces...I can't say that my foot-drop foot can dorsiflex as normally as my normal foot, but I'm able to clear the ground when I walk, and I'm really really happy about that!  I don't really catch my foot or trip at all, but the MBT shoes sound like a great idea. Braces are great when you need them, but the best brace of all is NO brace.  Right now I wear Ecco walking shoes, which I find very comfortable for me, both walking and driving. And yes, I am able to drive again after more than a year, so I've been very lucky in all of this.  The name of this website is "Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?"  I don't know if I will ever be completely the way I was before, but I consider myself a recovery story.  My best to you and all the other posters on this website--and never give up hope! 

Offline exrugbylad1986

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #665 on: January 28, 2009, 12:45:39 PM »
Hi Im a first timer on the board and am getting lots of useful tips but would like some help on various aspects of my injury.
Basically the injury occured while playing rugby.A couple of players landed on the side of my knee while going for the ball causing my knee to snap outwards and then snap back in (could do nothing about it due to the studs planted in the ground)
The outcome was a total dislocation of the knee causing all ligaments to tear (including the acl) and extensive peroneal nerve damage.I have had one operation (posterior lateral corner and ligament transfer) and am due for a second one next week (exploratory work on the nerve).
I am wondering how successful a nerve transfer is because that is what i believe is going to occur later on?
Also due to the nerve damage it has led to drop foot on my right leg, i will need a AFO to combat this and was wondering if anyone had any idea on what one to get. (have heard that the nhs one is not comfy whatsoever) Nerve regeneration obviously takes a long time and dont mind the price tag.
Has anyone else also been able to drive since such a injury because really miss not driving.
Thank you for your help
Matt

Offline Tanya8

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #666 on: January 29, 2009, 05:58:13 AM »
Hi Im a first timer on the board and am getting lots of useful tips but would like some help on various aspects of my injury.
Basically the injury occured while playing rugby.A couple of players landed on the side of my knee while going for the ball causing my knee to snap outwards and then snap back in (could do nothing about it due to the studs planted in the ground)
The outcome was a total dislocation of the knee causing all ligaments to tear (including the acl) and extensive peroneal nerve damage.I have had one operation (posterior lateral corner and ligament transfer) and am due for a second one next week (exploratory work on the nerve).
I am wondering how successful a nerve transfer is because that is what i believe is going to occur later on?
Also due to the nerve damage it has led to drop foot on my right leg, i will need a AFO to combat this and was wondering if anyone had any idea on what one to get. (have heard that the nhs one is not comfy whatsoever) Nerve regeneration obviously takes a long time and dont mind the price tag.
Has anyone else also been able to drive since such a injury because really miss not driving.
Thank you for your help
Matt

Hi Matt, and welcome to the forum...here's some info that you may find helpful. Braces---the plastic molded ones can be uncomfortable, but a light carbon brace by Otto Bock is really great by comparison.  Just use a search engine to find out about them and their Walk-on brace.  Also, Dorset Orthopaedics in England has a rubbery kind of brace, which many users say permits them to drive again---I have no experience with this brace, but as with Otto Bock, you can look them up on the web Research---excellent websites for peroneal nerve issues and information are New York University Medical center, and the Columbia University Medical Center, both located in New York.  Driving---although every case is different, I have resumed driving again after about a year of healing and a decompression surgery---it can be difficult when the right foot is the one affected, as it was in my case.  It took a little getting used to at first, but it did happen for me.  If you have any difficulty finding the URLs of the above mentioned websites, just leave a message on this website---Best of luck and healing to you!

Tanya

Offline exrugbylad1986

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #667 on: January 29, 2009, 02:02:40 PM »
Thank you for the help Tanya, its proving very useful.
Have just come out of my cast and caliper, I have now got an NHS AFO on and its true what people say, not comfortable at all!!!
I had a look at the sillicone one from the Dorset orthopaedics and i think that looks and probably feels the best so im either gonna get the NHS to get it or obviously pay for it myself.
One more question what did the decompression surgery involve because im sure thats what im gonna have in a few months??

Matt

Offline Tanya8

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #668 on: January 29, 2009, 08:13:08 PM »
Hi Matt...I'm glad you found the information useful---

Even though I had decompression surgery, just remember that every case is different, and I can only speak from my experiences. Decompression surgery is usually performed on an ambulatory basis, and in my case it was no big deal---in the hospital in the early morning, surgery, and then out the door by 2:00 PM the same afternoon.  Although you should keep the leg quiet for a few days and relax a bit, you are permitted to walk on it right after surgery. I really experienced minimum discomfort throughout the whole thing. Although this type of surgery was helpful in my case, prior EMG electrical testing will determine if you are a candidate for this type of surgery, and if it can be helpful in your particular circumstances.  Also, as far as I know about decompression surgery, there is a certain time frame for performing it in order for it to be effective---I think that time frame is about 4 to 8 months after an injury, but you should check with your neurosurgeon to be sure about this.  Between queuing up for the electrical testing appointments and seeing your doctor, time will pass quickly until you get the results from your tests. It might be a good idea to start asking questions now, if this procedure is to benefit you.  The very best of luck to you and just post here if you have any more questions---and let us know how you are doing---Tanya

Offline Abbo62

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #669 on: February 13, 2009, 06:45:05 PM »
Hi All,
This post is so reassuring and inspirational.
I had a motorbike RTA March 08 after a car done a U turn on me. I took the impact on my left knee which basically punched my leg out the back of my pelvis taking the sciatic nerve with it and stretching it in the thigh.
Immediately I could not move my foot other than a slight wiggle of some toes, after surgery to repair my pelvis I was told the nerve was intact but looking 'tatty' and time would tell what recovery was likely.
The nerve pain, burning sensations in my foot were far worse than the pelvis. Unfortunately after eight weeks my toes stopped wiggling, this was not a good sign but my ortho consultant could not tell me why and so was referred to my 1st Neurologist, I'm on my 4th now and have at last got an answer, scar tissue build up around the nerve.
The NHS has been great but you must persevere until you find the right specialist. I have just under gone decompression surgery at RNOH as they specialise in nerve trauma to remove it and hopefully will now get some results. EMG and NCS have shown some nerve regeneration and I get a shock in my toes if I tap on my outer calf, also the wiggle is back, all good I've been told.
I recommend a Dorset Ortho SAFO as I've been wearing one for two months which has improved my walking no end, bit expensive tho!
The body is a miraculous healer just have to give it time and we will get there in the end.
Good luck to you all.

Offline ah51416

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #670 on: March 04, 2009, 09:23:36 PM »
Hello everyone,

It's been a while since I last posted, and I was just starting to see a little eversion.  Now I have gained strength in that eversion and I have a small amount of dorsiflexion.  In the last month,  I have been able to lift all of my toes except the big one.  I am still seeing results even after I was told otherwise.  I still wear the afo when I walk, but I wear an aso when I work out.  I have since started competing in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and I won my first tournament a couple of weeks ago.  I believe that the brazilian jiu jitsu, wrestling, muay thai, and working out is opening up nerve pathways.

Offline soccerdoc

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #671 on: March 06, 2009, 02:08:54 AM »
Hi All,

My peroneal nerve injury was a long time ago and recovery was a slow process.  I resumed refereeing soccer while using the afo.  I am fairly certain the gait alteration put some significant loads on my left knee which in retrospect I should have paid a bit more attention to.  The various martial arts involve significant visual motor behavioral rehearsal in addition to the meditative mind-body focus aspects and these can be very beneficial. It is interesting the different things one can do to help the body respond.  Your post should be a helpful inspiration to people who may be experiencing a slower than desired recovery...............jim
L Knee: 1980 medial plication (?);1994 medial menisectomy 'bucket-handle tear; 2000 medial menisectomy w/dx mod-severe osteoarthritis; 2002 debridement w/dx severe osteoarthritis; 2003 HTO and LR.6/2/05  HTO hardware removal and debridement arthroscopy, 2009 L knee arthroscopy great result

Offline mom444

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #672 on: March 21, 2009, 01:45:00 AM »
Hello to all the new and returning members!  You are still in our thoughts and prayers.

My daughter is now almost six years old.  We still attempt to do the EMG triggered biofeedback and TES stickers at night, but quite frankly she is getting cranky over doing the exercises.  Still no complete dorsiflexion, but she is getting some movement...  It might be subtle dorsiflexion?  ...It's so hard to tell...

I wondered if anyone's physical therapist has suggestions about other exercises to strengthen the anterior tibialis.  Andre, would you know?

I was thinking of getting her one of those little "stair climber" machines.  Would it be worth it?
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline ruaz

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #673 on: March 30, 2009, 04:25:19 PM »
On 2/23/09 I suffered a left pilon fracture (tibia and fibula fracture just above the ankle) while skiing.  At first all I was dealing with was the broken leg.  I had a cast above the knee for a week and then I had surgery on 3/6/09 for internal fixation of the fracture.  Pre-op I could move my toes up and down and I had normal sensation.  The anesthesiologist and orthopedic surgeon suggested that I have a peroneal nerve block to prevent post-operative pain.  They injected local anesthesia around the nerve and they placed a catheter near the nerve in order to deliver anesthesia to the nerve for 2 -3 days post-op.  I thought that sounded like a good idea.  Everything with the surgery went ok.  On post-op day number 3, I had the catheter removed and I was discharged home.  After about 2 days, though, I was still numb and I still could not move my foot.  I knew this was not good.  The common peroneal nerve was either damaged from the nerve block, crushed by the tourniquet during the operation or had pressure on it from the cast that I could not detect because my leg was numb from the anesthesia.  I guess it really doesn't matter too much because the results are the same.  I can't dorsiflex my foot. 
The orthopedic surgeon and the anesthesiologist both think the nerve will come back with time.  Last week I saw the neurologist and neurosurgeon and I had an EMG with NCV done.  I didn't mind the EMG with the needles so much, but the nerve conduction studies were "shocking" to say the least.  My leg was burning for the next 24 hours.  Anyway, the nerve conduction tests seemed to indicate that the nerve was intact.  The EMG was not as good.  There were signs of deinnervation of the muscles supplied by the common peroneal nerve.  That was the bad news.  The good news was that I have sensation, although it is not exactly normal, along the outside of my shin and on the top of my foot (except for a small patch on the top of my foot that is completely numb).  The sensation has actually been getting better, but, slowly.  I also have a Tinnel's sign at  my knee as well as at the ankle.  Movement, though is a little strange.  I can, sort of, invert my foot.  It is very weak and I can only do it some of the time.  When I try very hard to dorsiflex my foot, my toes sort of move apart and they shake but they don't move up. Has anyone else had this happen?  I can't evert my foot at all.  The movement seems to be better, but, it is hard to tell.  Maybe I am just seeing things because I want the nerve to work so badly.
The worst part is the fear of the unknown.  I have no idea if the nerve will ever come back, I don't know if I will need to have the nerve explored, and I don't know if I will ever be able to walk without a brace.  Even reading all the research on the subject has left me confused, so it no surprise that  physicians are not sure what to tell patients.  I guess all I can do is sit tight and wait this thing out.  But, that is hard to do.

Offline deadhead2002000

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #674 on: April 03, 2009, 04:17:22 AM »
On 2/23/09 I suffered a left pilon fracture (tibia and fibula fracture just above the ankle) while skiing.  At first all I was dealing with was the broken leg.  I had a cast above the knee for a week and then I had surgery on 3/6/09 for internal fixation of the fracture.  Pre-op I could move my toes up and down and I had normal sensation.  The anesthesiologist and orthopedic surgeon suggested that I have a peroneal nerve block to prevent post-operative pain.  They injected local anesthesia around the nerve and they placed a catheter near the nerve in order to deliver anesthesia to the nerve for 2 -3 days post-op.  I thought that sounded like a good idea.  Everything with the surgery went ok.  On post-op day number 3, I had the catheter removed and I was discharged home.  After about 2 days, though, I was still numb and I still could not move my foot.  I knew this was not good.  The common peroneal nerve was either damaged from the nerve block, crushed by the tourniquet during the operation or had pressure on it from the cast that I could not detect because my leg was numb from the anesthesia.  I guess it really doesn't matter too much because the results are the same.  I can't dorsiflex my foot. 
The orthopedic surgeon and the anesthesiologist both think the nerve will come back with time.  Last week I saw the neurologist and neurosurgeon and I had an EMG with NCV done.  I didn't mind the EMG with the needles so much, but the nerve conduction studies were "shocking" to say the least.  My leg was burning for the next 24 hours.  Anyway, the nerve conduction tests seemed to indicate that the nerve was intact.  The EMG was not as good.  There were signs of deinnervation of the muscles supplied by the common peroneal nerve.  That was the bad news.  The good news was that I have sensation, although it is not exactly normal, along the outside of my shin and on the top of my foot (except for a small patch on the top of my foot that is completely numb).  The sensation has actually been getting better, but, slowly.  I also have a Tinnel's sign at  my knee as well as at the ankle.  Movement, though is a little strange.  I can, sort of, invert my foot.  It is very weak and I can only do it some of the time.  When I try very hard to dorsiflex my foot, my toes sort of move apart and they shake but they don't move up. Has anyone else had this happen?  I can't evert my foot at all.  The movement seems to be better, but, it is hard to tell.  Maybe I am just seeing things because I want the nerve to work so badly.
The worst part is the fear of the unknown.  I have no idea if the nerve will ever come back, I don't know if I will need to have the nerve explored, and I don't know if I will ever be able to walk without a brace.  Even reading all the research on the subject has left me confused, so it no surprise that  physicians are not sure what to tell patients.  I guess all I can do is sit tight and wait this thing out.  But, that is hard to do.

hello ive been a frequent flyer on this site since my motorcycle accident on oct 30th. 2008......i had an open dislocation and everything was torn and i mean everything!!!drs told me id never walk again and all the what seems to be regular bs some drs feed their patients...anyways back to my story....ive had foot drop since my accident....ive been able to wiggle my toes alittle since mid december but really no better since ive been able to move them..i met with a dr nath and am scheduled have a nerve transfer/nerve transplant/decompression surgery in about a weeks time and was wondering if anyone can tell me anything about what to expect from this procedure or anything that would help me..thks much,jeremy















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