Banner - Hide this banner





Author Topic: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?  (Read 469442 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline jove

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #570 on: January 23, 2008, 03:58:08 AM »
"Which brings me on to the point that I was looking for when I found this site - does anyone know how long recovery is after a decompression surgery and if I'll have a cast on for weeks or anything?"

After my nerve graft I had a soft cast, (brace) for maybe 10 days or so. I was on crutches/crutch for a few weeks, no weight bearing for the first 3-4 days, then gradually bearing more and more weight. If you don't get a graft, I'd guess it should be less than that.

good luck with it.

Offline jcblank

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 58
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #571 on: January 23, 2008, 05:53:33 AM »
i just had peroneal nerve decompression dec 20.  i was wbat and only used the crutches for 3 days.  i used pain meds x 2 days.  after having excrutiating nerve pain for 6 months this barely hurt.  i am still waiting for nerve regeneration and wondering if/when it will occur.  the md wasnt sure if i would recover or not.  my doc found a stitch through my nerve from my meniscal transplant 6 months previous and removed it. i am walking so much better now, still with my afo, due to being pain free.
1995 menisectomy
9/06 menisectomy with resultant blood clot
6/07 meniscal transplant with peroneal nerve damage
12/07 peroneal nerve decompression

Offline NEWFIE

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 8
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #572 on: January 24, 2008, 08:51:52 PM »
Hi Jove,

I also had a nerve graft in May 2007. It has been a long process and I have gained alot of patience as I am sure you know. My perroneal nerve was severed in a motorcycle crash and repaired by harvesting the surel nerve in the back of my leg and grafting it into the perroneal nerve. Is this the same type of graft that you had? I am getting some feeling back and am able to distinguish hot and cold to about the mid part of my lower leg, after I had the graft I could not feel anything from the knee down so this is a positive for me for sure. I am not able to dorsiflex or evert my foot YET! I had so much damage to my leg that the only thing holding my leg together was the skin and I was very lucky not to have lost it. One of the doctors told me that I probably would not walk again but of course that only gave me a reason to fight harder and to show them that I would walk again and I have been walking with an afo since october. DETERMINATION, Now that is a great word! Let me know what stage and what results you are getting so maybe we can compare notes.

I hope you are all doing well!

NEWFIE

Offline mom444

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 161
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #573 on: January 25, 2008, 03:55:18 PM »

Hi,

I'm new on here - in fact I've never used a forum in my life!!  Anyway I found this site by accident just looking for some info on the nerve decompression surgery I'm having soon.  I decided to write mainly to encourage mom444 with your daughter. 

I'm probably quite a unique case on here but very sound much like your daughter. I'm 26 years old and have right foot drop since about the age of 7 or 8. We have no idea when or how it happened, I had no pain I don't remember noticing anything or ever tripping or even learning to walk differently, I just noticed I couldn't flex my right foot one day. I had numerous doctors appointrments and EMG tests (this was before the days of MRI), I think the diagnosis was that is was a deformity that happened in the womb but they didn't do anything about it other than was sent to a physiotherapist and was given a splint. I then saw a paeditrican once a year up until being 16 and was then discharged.   He did recommend a tendon transplant on my last visit but said I was too young at the time so nothing ever happened.

Although this might not be the encouragement you're after I just wanted to say that even if your daughter does not recover it really is not the end of the world and she can lead a completely normal life - in fact reading some of these stories I think the best time to get it is when you're young as you learn to do every moment with the foot drop and don't have to relearn everything.  To be honest I don't think I could walk normally if I tried! I wore a splint for a couple of weeks when I was 7 but then stopped - I didn't need it and found it restrictive, plus could wear the shoes I wanted to!  I've never used anythign since.  I was a very normal busy active kid and in fact was the most sporty of all my family! I went horse riding, did dance, I took PE at GCSE and was on my school badminton and hockey teams.  I drive a normal manual gearstick car, have a good job, have a masters degree, and have travelled extensively.  My foot drop has hardly restricted me in anything. there are of course some negatives and it has been frustrating at times.  I can't always wear the shoes I want - I'm unbalanced in high stiletto heels cos of the lack of muscle, and shoes without ankle straps just come off my foot. As a fashion-conscious girl that's quite a problem!!!  I struggled on the steeper slopes when I went skiing (but would definitely go again), again cos of poor balance on my right foot - also means I would never be a great ice-skater or ballerina!! It was also quite a funny site when I tried to walk in flippers when I went snorkelling - needless to say I ended up walking backwards  ;D  I also am more likely to go over on that ankle and did tear the ligaments in my ankle when I was 15.  I did get teased a little bit at high school but hardly at all, and now people don't even notice it till I tell them  - at least that's what they say!!  Luckily I have very small feet which does make it less noticeable :)

Your daughter is having tons more treatment, therapy and care than I ever did so I'm sure she has much greater chance of recovery. And being so young it will just seem normal to her the way she walks.

Anyway after 10 years of seeing no one about my leg I managed to get a referral last year to a neurologist, as I have started having pain in my knee, i think becasue I use it and the thigh muscles to balance and it was starting to get sore, and wondered whether I coudl talk about a tendon transfer.  I had all the nerve/EMG tests done all over again where the guy said I may have caused the foot drop by crossing my legs as a kid and that I had to stop doing it now - weird as I'd never heard that before!! I got referred to a top peroneal nerve specialist, had an MRI of my leg and finally got a definitive diagnosis after 20 years!!! There is a swelling on my nerve near the tibial head, am going in for surgery next month to have it removed and a biopsy taken.  He said it might help but after 20 years there is a very small chance it could recover.  After so long it would be quite a weird feeling if it did...!

Which brings me on to the point that I was looking for when I found this site - does anyone know how long recovery is after a decompression surgery and if I'll have a cast on for weeks or anything?  The highly efficient NHS have given me no clue about anything other than a date for admission and what to pack!!!

Hope that helps mom444, of course if I could choose I wouldn't have foot drop but for the most part I don't really think about it.  I totally undertand you being worried about her and really hope that she  does improve, but I hope this reassures you that it won't really hinder her in the future if it doesn't get better.   

Hope all you other people suffering with this manage to recover well, I'll be looking on here for post-op tips for trying to regain muscle/nerve functoin if it's possible.  I didn't get chance to read through all the posts on this section but if there is anyone else out there who is or was in a similar situation to me I'd love to hear from you!!
 

Thank you jenswin for your post!  There ARE quite a few odd similarities!  Some doctors still wonder if something happened to her in the womb or if something internal caused the damage.

We took my daughter to Pittsburgh and saw the specialist yesterday.  To be honest, I have a hard time remembering what he told us because by the time we got to his office I was so stressed and drained.

He was very concerned by how long she had had the nerve damage and muscle disuse, but he did... I guess somewhat say that we still needed to "give it another 12 to 18 months" to see what happens.  He also said we should continue aggressively with the e stim and get a surface EMG machine.

He also, I think, said that at this point we may have seen all the nerve regeneration we'd get but that this point now would involve possible recovery through SPROUTING.

Now, as I mentioned before, I just started researching this sprouting phenomenon.  I think it's like what happened to people who recovered from polio.  Apparently, healthy nerves from undamaged muscles can somehow sprout into damaged muscles and "adopt the orphaned muscle fibers."  Or something like that.

I can't think straigt right now but I thank you so much for your input. 

Best of luck to you too in your recovery jenswin and to all of you!  DON'T GIVE UP.
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline 1knee4me

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #574 on: January 26, 2008, 12:18:19 AM »
i hurt my knee playing football this year partially tore the acl,pcl and tore lcl. also have drop foot from the peroneal nerve. doctor told me it was stretched. it's been 3 months since i hurt it and got surgery on the lcl.  i feel some sort of tingling or electric shock when i flick the back of the calf. what does that mean. and what was the quickest anyone ever was able to regain the movement of their foot after injuring it. I'm really hoping to play football again in college.

Offline jove

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #575 on: January 27, 2008, 03:38:14 AM »

yes, Newfie, I think it is the same type graft. Mine was 3" (7 cm) long, just above the knee. They took 3 pieces from the back of my calf to use as the graft. I hyperextended my knee in a grappling match (like wrestling sort of), and also tore the ACL and some other stuff in there.
I don't notice much progress in the nerve yet, but remain hopeful. Otherwise, the leg is getting stronger. I like to ride a bike, and swim. I have not tried wrestling or jiu jitsu again, yet, though I'm still hoping....I did go back to kick boxing class, and I can still hit a heavy bag, but I don't like to kick, or spar, yet. My ACL is torn and not repaired, so......I want to be careful there...
Newfie, it aounds as if you are making some progress there, with the sensations coming back. Keep it up.

Mom444; sorry you didn't get better news from Pittsburgh...maybe after you're all rested up, and had a chance to digest the new info, things might look more hopeful. I've read that brachial plexus palsy can happen during birth - but never read anything about peroneal palsy happening during birth. Maybe you mentioned it before, but I don't remember, did your daughter ever show normal peroneal function? or has she always had the palsy (from birth)?

1knee4me; have you been evaluated yet by a good neurologist? If not, then you need to see one, they will be able to give you answers. Many people do eventually regain normal movement of the foot, but I have no idea what the all-time-record-quick-recovery time might be. The tingling or shock you mention may be what's called Tinel's sign, all I know is- that is the response of an injured nerve when you tap on it. If some one else can explain what it means, I'd also love to hear more about it. Anyhow, 1knee4me, if you haven't seen a neurologist yet, you really should do so, they can assess your injury and explain your options.


Offline amdre

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 116
  • Liked: 2
  • " I Can Run!!!!!!!!!!!!!"
    • myspace.com
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #576 on: January 31, 2008, 06:27:24 PM »
Hey Everyone,

Just went to my third EMG test Yesterday....and got some pretty interesting news from my doctor...

first off the nerve has grown back from the crush injury i had recieved 2 years ago....the thing about it tho is that the nerve is still showing sign of injury he said...i am getting full transmission of signals through the nerve to the muscles but at a slower then normal pace...this he said should get better over the years as it seems to be healing in good health. the other thing he noted is that my Tib Ant muscle was abnormally oversized....he compared this to a patient who had been suffering from the viral disease Polio.....he said the strength is still significantly weaker but the size is over grown and not growing in in the proper path as a normal would...hes said this should not effact anything i do but may give me problems later on in the future. he also noted that the Brevis muscle has experienced alot of atrophy but is still active and functioning...needs more aggressive treatment to help strengthen the rest of the ankle.

so pretty much...to conclude the nerve has regenerated but signals are still relearning the proper patterns on transmission to te muscles it once controlled.....this whole process needs to be retrained and the muscles need to be feed information to keep the alive enough to read and process the weak signals from the damaged nerve....the neat thing was this doctor who once told me id probably never walk proper actually had faith that i could regain much more normal functioning in these areas with proper therapy.

Dislocated knee in a Football game
Damage: Posterolateral Compartment,MCL Partial,IT band Tear,Popliteus tear,Hamstring and Peroneal Nerve Damage (Foot Drop)

Reapired in Surgery: Posterolateral Compartment Sept 17th/05
Scope Nov 20th/05, ACL Recon Sept 26th/06

Offline mom444

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 161
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #577 on: February 02, 2008, 04:35:13 PM »
Hey Everyone,

Just went to my third EMG test Yesterday....and got some pretty interesting news from my doctor...

first off the nerve has grown back from the crush injury i had recieved 2 years ago....the thing about it tho is that the nerve is still showing sign of injury he said...i am getting full transmission of signals through the nerve to the muscles but at a slower then normal pace...this he said should get better over the years as it seems to be healing in good health. the other thing he noted is that my Tib Ant muscle was abnormally oversized....he compared this to a patient who had been suffering from the viral disease Polio.....he said the strength is still significantly weaker but the size is over grown and not growing in in the proper path as a normal would...hes said this should not effact anything i do but may give me problems later on in the future. he also noted that the Brevis muscle has experienced alot of atrophy but is still active and functioning...needs more aggressive treatment to help strengthen the rest of the ankle.

so pretty much...to conclude the nerve has regenerated but signals are still relearning the proper patterns on transmission to te muscles it once controlled.....this whole process needs to be retrained and the muscles need to be feed information to keep the alive enough to read and process the weak signals from the damaged nerve....the neat thing was this doctor who once told me id probably never walk proper actually had faith that i could regain much more normal functioning in these areas with proper therapy.



Andre,

Thanks for keeping us updated on your progress.  It's interesting that you made the polio comment, because, as I mentioned in a previous post, recently in my researching blitz I have come across a few things that do compare peripheral nerve injuries and recovery to recovery from polio.  Don't quote me too directly on this, but I guess that when people recovered from polio it was from the healthy nerves from nearby healthy muscles "sprouting" into the damaged muscles and taking over for them.  Only when this happened it seemed that the muscles had to get bigger and work twice as hard; that could explain your larger anterior tib muscles...?  The term "post polio syndrome" refers to what polio survivors experienced years later after the muscles "wore out" after years of having to work twice as hard.  That could be what the doc meant by "causing problems in the future?"

Anyhow, it's good that you are still getting some recovery and that you got messages how things could be getting better still over time. 

Thank you again Andre and all of you for your continued input and support.  WE NEED EACH OTHER!  We need to continue sharing information and cheering each other on.

Meanwhile, my daughter is now four and a half.  It's been just over eighteen months since her surgery.  There have been some minor dragon appearances but just on and off.  Incidentally, the Pittsburgh doc mentioned how "burning pain is bad" and "pins and needles pain is good" in regard to indicating muscles either getting better or worse.  It's hard to get a four year old to tell you the difference.  Yet I have heard so many of you on this board and people in other sources mention "pain is good" so I'm taking that.

We are going to the pediatic nerve injuiry physical therapist next week.  We may use a new kind of EMG machine on my daughter, it's called (I think) EMG triggered biofeedback.  Somehow it uses surface EMG to pick up minor muscle contractions and then triggers an electrical stimulation to make a contraction.  They have used it in brachial plexus kids, but it's still experimental.

And I swear I do see my daughter's little muscles trying to move when she tries to lift her foot.  She can somehow make her big toe move, or maybe just LOOK like it's moving, but it's something.  The thing is, that when she tries to move her foot and that toe either moves or just looks like it, THAT'S when the little leg muscles seem to contract, the anterior tib.

I still think about that one study I read where a 43 year old woman had complete peroneal nerve palsy and didn't have decompression surgery until about 21 months later.  She did get better after three years.

I still keep hanging in there and hoping and praying for all of you too.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2008, 04:39:19 PM by mom444 »
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline amdre

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 116
  • Liked: 2
  • " I Can Run!!!!!!!!!!!!!"
    • myspace.com
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #578 on: February 04, 2008, 04:26:56 AM »
Hey Mom444,

u said u see small twitches in ur daugther toes when she tries to dorsiflex? when i first started noticing signs...i would get the same things...i should my doctors they thought i was seeing things but i knew it was different and something i never saw before...this could be very good step in her recovery....always praying her. hope everthing goes well with pediatric nerve therapists
Dislocated knee in a Football game
Damage: Posterolateral Compartment,MCL Partial,IT band Tear,Popliteus tear,Hamstring and Peroneal Nerve Damage (Foot Drop)

Reapired in Surgery: Posterolateral Compartment Sept 17th/05
Scope Nov 20th/05, ACL Recon Sept 26th/06

Offline AmandaC

  • Regular Poster
  • ***
  • Posts: 50
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #579 on: February 14, 2008, 12:39:08 AM »
Hi All
Thought I would drop you all a line to see how everyone is doing.  There has been no change for me regarding the foot drop although my inversion is getting stronger and the amount of movement has increased since December.  Does anyone have problems with there AFO rubbing the bottom of there foot especially betweent he ball of the big toe and ball of the foot.  Im not sure if I am more uncomfortable as my toes do not move at all and they feel like they are pushed flat in the AFO all day?

Well in now 10 weeks pregnant, will be going for a scan in a couple of weeks, getting a bit nervous as i lost one at 14 weeks a few years back.  I have been extremely sick, the Doctors were going to put me on a drip last week to rehydrate but I managed to get a bit of fluid down so got away with it.  I have had 3 and half weeks of constant vomitting and nausia, no fun.  Especially hard when we are trying to hide it from everyone, some people have guessed already.

Well I hope everyone is doing well and keeping there spirits up - remember never give up but also we can all still live a full life with our floppy foot - keep smiling :D

Amanda

Offline mom444

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 161
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #580 on: February 14, 2008, 03:47:39 PM »
Amanda,

I hope and pray that everything goes well for you.  I went through some fertility issues too a while back so I can understand your nervousness and pain.  But keep the faith.

We took my daughter to the out of town physical therapist Tuesday and tried the EMG triggered stim and it seemed interesting.  There ARE in fact contractions in my daughter's anterior tib muscles but the muscles that can control dorsiflexion are still not responding.  The big toe it turns out is controlled by a different muscle, so the fact that she can move it now is good but not a groundbreaking as we thought. 

The therapist is probably a great contact for us though, because she is part of a network of doctors and physical therapists who work specifically with children with nerve injuries.  She even has connections to the famous Dr. Nath from Texas. 

Another interesting thing she told us is that the anterior tib muscles are up high on the shin and the dorsiflexion is actually controlled by the lower tendons that act as pulleys.  I was under the impression that my daughter had to have "regrowth all down the front of her shin" to recover.  Some therapists told us this also.  But there is something...  yes SOMETHING going on in the anterior tib,  just no dorsiflexion yet.

The EMG triggered stim machine will cost us a whopping $1,600 dollars (American) to buy!  I'm sure that our health insurance company will laugh at us if we ask them to pay for it  :P 

How have those of you in Canada and the UK fared with getting coverage for equipment?

Also, HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY.
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline jove

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #581 on: February 15, 2008, 02:38:13 AM »
Congatulations, Amanda.
As far as the AFO irritating the sole of the foot, mine does that also, at the edge where it is cut back. Mine irritates the outer edge of the foot near the little toe. What I do is, take an insole from a running shoe and cut it back just slightly (maybe cut 1/2 " off the front toe, maybe 1/4" off each side) just so that it fits inside of the AFO. It protects the spot where the AFO interface (cut edge) irritates my foot.  I also cut the heel out of the insole, otherwise it raises my heel just enough to hit the wrong spot in the AFO heel pocket, then my heel hurts instead!. Cut the heel out of the insole(fair it in at an angle) so that won't happen. You may have to try a few different insoles, or sacrifice a few insoles to get it cut just right.

mom444, any progress is good. Keep us posted.

Offline ej_dlvga

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #582 on: February 17, 2008, 12:58:23 PM »
Hi...

I was in a vehicular accident just last December. I suffered from burns and my left leg was pretty beat up. My peroneal nerve was apparently injured during the accident, but my doctors were confident that it was neurapraxia and that it would recover on its own. I finished all the procedures for my burns and we began focusing on my leg. I had an MRI and apparently, it wasnt just neurapraxia. My 2nd EMG showed no improvement, and MRI confirmed that i have a partial tear on my peroneal nerve. My neurologist gave me 2 weeks of rehab and therapy before another EMG but if nothing else happens, she's going to recommend nerve graft surgery.

Has anyone recovered fully from something like this? A partial tear? My other doctors would tell me that the success rates of nerve grafting are low. But recently, technology like active EMG during the graft have improved the success rates for the nerve "taking" the graft. I'm wearing an AFO now but the thought of an all-or-nothing surgery scares me. They say that I should wait 6 months before any drastic action but knowing that there's a partial tear has led them to suggest grafting as my eventual option. If chances of any recovery are slim, I've been thinking that I just wait it out... give my body time to recover. Any advice?

Thanks.

Offline ranthony

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #583 on: February 17, 2008, 03:15:45 PM »
Hi All

[This is the first time I am on any sort of message board or forum or whatever it is called. In October 2006 I had a motorcycle accident and the doctors also thought I am going to lose my leg. Everything was severed at the knee. Today, 1 year and 4 months later my leg is fine except for peroneal nerve damage and after my 2nd visit to the neurologist he said there is no nerve regeneration and do not expect any recovery for my drop foot. Weird thing though is that I can now slightly pull my toes straight (not the big one though) and when I flick the back of my calf then I feel sensation down in my foot and toes. Have you guys heard of anyone that recovered from drop foot after an open wound injury in which the peroneal nerve was severed? Amdre you seem to be doing well and I sincerely hope you have full recovery. Can anyone of you make any suggestions as to what can be done to help the situation or at least better the chances of recovery?   ]
Quote

Offline mom444

  • Forum Faithful
  • ****
  • Posts: 161
  • Liked: 0
Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #584 on: February 18, 2008, 02:43:35 AM »
Welcome ej_dlvga and ranthony and best wishes for both of your recoveries!

We hope you find lots of interesting and helpful input here.

Keep us posted and we'll try our best to give you advice.

The only thing I can advise for both of your right now, and I am not a medical professional but I am a teacher and a researcher who has ready MANY studies about this injury, is to keep the faith.  Also, I highly recommend that you both do some kind of electric muscle stimulation to keep your muscles from atrophying and to increase the blood flow to the area.  My daughter does low level overnight stimulation but for adults they also have EMS units and other stimulators. 

Also, you will find here from all of us that timeframes for recovery and patterns of recovery differ for all.

We wish you both the best and send prayers and love.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2008, 02:48:14 AM by mom444 »
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.















support