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Author Topic: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?  (Read 453106 times)

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Offline amdre

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #555 on: January 03, 2008, 07:27:01 PM »
hey mom444 ,

i sent u a PM as well.

im sorry to hear about your EMG results i know the feeling of not having good results come back to you after these tests and all you can do is stay strong and positive. The results are only telling you what is going on right now and does not telegraph what is in store for your daugthers recovery. you have been doing a great job in informing yourself understanding and being apart of the issue 100 percent and even though the results are negative it does not reflect how your daughter heals regardless of the time estimates the doctors tell you.i had gaps as well within my EMG tests one at 4 months and one at 9/10 months. both negative with 0 improvement we all heal at a different pace... keep her mind fresh with a healthy thought process and keep her spirits high about her injury(not coping...but a confidence of movement in the future) ...i am also going to reschedule another to see how much recovery has gone on and to compare the readings to the first two that i had now that i am fully functional on my foot.

In answer to your question abut the "dragons" i still get them to this day sometimes pins and neddles and on rare occasions i get the shocks and as well. It's weird sometimes my tib ant and peroneal tendon will feel really tight....so i will stretch it and massage it myself....and it will feel like i just cracked open a sack full of Dragons and they will flow right down the damaged nerve path to my Big Toe which i currently still do not have full motor control of(slowly creeping back). i truly believe that this feeling is regeneration because my toe is moving more and more each day...the more i do nothing...the more those areas stay tight weak and unused....the more i massage move and stretch it the more movement i notice out of the effected areas. i bet your Daughter's nerve is regenerating well but her muscles may have experienced atrophy and without muscle movement they wont get good readings. my second and first EMG test i could evert and invert my foot ..(just the motion no strength in my eversion)...and they still said i had no improvement and 0 nerve conductivity.

Another weird thing is that even though massaging can start the Sparks it also takes them away if i do it long enough and this makes my leg feels brand new ...still weak but it feels "normal".


sorry for the run on ......hope i answered your question ...if theres nething else i have noticed that i didnt wrte i will send you another message.

Dislocated knee in a Football game
Damage: Posterolateral Compartment,MCL Partial,IT band Tear,Popliteus tear,Hamstring and Peroneal Nerve Damage (Foot Drop)

Reapired in Surgery: Posterolateral Compartment Sept 17th/05
Scope Nov 20th/05, ACL Recon Sept 26th/06

Offline G_Bronson

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #556 on: January 07, 2008, 12:00:13 PM »
Hello Everyone,
Happy new year to all of you, sorry i havent posted in a while, ive been trying to remain positive but it was a little difficult during the holidays as it was one year on boxing day since my injury. i still feel lots of twitches and sparks but no real new muclse movement.
I am still working hard with my physio and can feel lots of positive sensory changes.

Sorry to hear about your results mom444. I hope your little girl gets some good news soon. I can't imagine how hard it is on you.

Hamish, max, Newfie, Amanda, Jackie and everyone else, i hope you had a merry christmas and the new year is full of healing for all of you.

I hope you are able to stay more positive than myself lately. But i am not about to give up yet.

Great to hear from you Andre, you are an inspiration!

Gordon 

Offline Hamish9

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #557 on: January 07, 2008, 05:34:03 PM »
Happy New Year Everyone!

Gordon sorry to hear you are feeling pretty down at the moment. Do you have any foot movement at all or is it just changes is sensation at the moment. It wasn't until a year that I started to get any sign of movement. I am now 16 months since injury and my aversion it starting to get stronger but had a bit of a set back when I sprained my ankle quite badly but that is imroving now. Dorsiflexion is still very weak. Don't give up and I am sure movement will start to come back soon.

Good to hear from you Andre! I managed to watch a couple of the Argos games on the Tv. How did the season go?

Good to hear you are back on the horse Amanda and hope your recovery continues.

Mom, I keep thinking of you and your daughter.

Hope everyone else is doing OK!

Hamish

Broke fibula and dislocated knee rugby training
Fibula repair and Posterolateral Corner reconstruction Sept 06
Footdrop
ACL reconstruction Feb 07

Offline mom444

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #558 on: January 10, 2008, 10:51:47 PM »
Amdre,

I read your post and had to register for this site and reply.

I had a similar injury as yourself.  On Dec 11 1993 (12 years ago) I dislocated my left knee in a wrestling match.  The Popliteal Artery along with the peroneal nerve were crushed.  I had no pulse in my leg below my knee for nearly an hour, until the ER doc reduced the dislocation.  Luckily the pulse returned otherwise amputation could have been a result.  Diagnossis was a blown ACL, PCL, LCL a torn MCL and a fractured Fibula as well as the peroneal nerve damage.  I was told the same thing you were Post op.  All the Doc's said I will be lucky if I were to ever walk remotely normal again.  It was predicted that my wrestling career was over and that I probablly would never be able to run as I use to for wrestling practice.  The tests showed no to little peroneal nerve regeneration would ever occur and I would have to wear an AFO for the remainder of my life.  I was refered to one of the best OS in the pacific Northwest Dr. Peter Mandt who has worked with the U.S. ski team, seahawks and many other teams and such, luckily for me.  Dr. Mandt conuslted many renowned Doc's and even flew one in from somewhere (cant remember where). After ~ 8 hr's in the OR the "global reconstruction" was complete and I had 2 alographs done from 2 different donor's for my ACL and PCL.  After many months of painfull rehab and many phycological bouts I was able to walk with crutches.  I rehabed very rigorusly and was able to return to Wrestling the following year, with the AFO for the remainder of high school (I never returend to football though b/c it was too risky with all the cutting thats done).  I was never my self again on the wrestling mat but at least I was back doing what I loved.  I had to ride the stationary bike while my temates ran for the remainder of my high school career.  I was unable to lift my foot without the AFO until my Freshman year in College, the nerve had taken 3 years to regenerate enough to walk without the AFO.  But the Point here is it did regenerate.  If you do you physical therapy until you cant stand to do it any more, then do it more you can over come this.  I didnt even do my therapy enough, I wish I had b/c I may have even more dorsiflexion if I had.  My frshman year in college I was recruited by the track coach while lifiting in the weight room, he wanted me to throw the shot, javilin and discus.  The following year he wanted me to run x-country to train for track and I was actually able to run with success, I was awarded 2x's as the most improved male athlete on the team once my College running carreer was over and at nearly 180 lbs (a huge runner) had recorded a 6.13 min/mile average over a 10k race.  12 years down the road I have yet to have another knee surgery and I can walk, run, snowboard and just about anything I want.  Ive heard of and have friends that have only torn thier ACLs that have had numerous surgeries.  With hard work and dedication you can over come anything.  Yes I still have some pain and I still have drop foot but hey I cant even remember what it was like to have a normal knee.

Jake

Hello all,

I was just reading this OLD post from a guy who responded to Andre.  It looks liek globalrecon is gone but the things he said still have me hopeful.

"I was unable to lift my foot without the AFO until my Freshman year in College, the nerve had taken 3 years to regenerate enough to walk without the AFO.  But the Point here is it did regenerate.  If you do you physical therapy until you cant stand to do it any more, then do it more you can over come this.  I didnt even do my therapy enough, I wish I had b/c I may have even more dorsiflexion if I had."

This guy had his nerve/function eventually come back, but after THREE YEARS.

I was researching some things online and I found something that may or may not have to do with us, but there is some theory about "orphaned muscle fibers" in people with nerve injuries are "adopted" by other still functioning muscle fibers.  A scenario like this was often seen in people with polio who semi recovered (although the people with polio had problems with weakness returning.)

I'm still in a tizzy over the doctors saying "it's over" and the time frame issues.  I still say the studies I have read give time frames of up to three or sometimes seven years for recovery.

Hmmm..

Here are the positives:

--It's only been 18 months since her surgery, and recovery times of up to three years have been reported.

--As of late August of last year (about 4 or 5 months ago) there were signs of at least NERVE recovery, even if the muscle showed no more recruitment.

--There were signs of muscle recruitment 8 months ago, 8 months is 8 months...  Long time?  Maybe, but there is still history of recuritment within the past year...

--She had "the dragon" last Sunday and Monday nights.

--The TES overnight stimulation will hopefully build up the remaining muscles and improve their health so that maybe the existing regenerated nerve will be "picked up" by them.

I keep all of your in my prayers.  Please still check in with me.
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline jcblank

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #559 on: January 11, 2008, 07:36:46 AM »
amandac
   i too have been given the option of a tendon transfer--but at this time i am opting to wait and see if i get any regeneration.  i had surgery again 3 weeks ago for a peroneal nerve decompression and they found the cause of my drop foot-a stitch through my nerve from my meniscal transplant.  the best thing is i am now pain free since the day i had the stitch removed but still unable to dorsiflex the foot 7 months out now.  my nerve was not looking good where the stitch was and was starting to die so we are unsure when/if regeneration will occur.  only time will tell.  tired of waiting but will have to.
1995 menisectomy
9/06 menisectomy with resultant blood clot
6/07 meniscal transplant with peroneal nerve damage
12/07 peroneal nerve decompression

Offline AmandaC

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #560 on: January 12, 2008, 07:16:37 PM »
jcblank,
Im not sure how but I had not read your last few posts.  I am so pleased that you are out of pain, I understand what a relief it is as my operation in October has given me a similar outcome.  In regard to your nerve been stitched is that not neglegence by the surgeon?  Are they liable for compensation?
Can you turn your foot inwards at all?

I have some news - no foot movement but I am pregnant - only about 6 - 7 weeks so I wont be telling friends and family for a while yet, I made that mistake a few years ago and we lost our first at 14 weeks.  It is fairly exciting and a bit scarey.

Hope you are all doing well.
Amanda

Offline mom444

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #561 on: January 12, 2008, 08:51:47 PM »
Amanda,

Good luck with the baby.  I know your pain, I had a loss too at 14 weeks a few years ago.

In the meantime, we've been referred to a specialist in Pittsburgh for my daughter.

I hope you all are well.
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline jcblank

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #562 on: January 12, 2008, 10:12:23 PM »
amanda--yes there is "liability" on the docs part.  i have looked into that but a lawyer wants $50,000. to pursue it and the outcomes would not be more than that at this time.  he said it is hard to sue an md as it goes on there permanant recort so they try to avoid it thats why it costs so much.  i have researched it also and got the same thing that it is hard to do.  right now i am waiting to see if/when i get any return and if i dont get any then suing may be a better option.
as for my foot i can invert and evert but weakly--cannot dorsiflex at all--no muscular action according to emg.  i am now 3 weeks post op from the stitch removal and they said there was a 2-3 cm section that was damaged so according to regeneration rule of 1 mm per day i should start to see things happen soon possibly.  if i dont get return he has mentioned a tendon transfer to hold my foot up as i have so much laxity in it.
good luck on the baby--hope all goes well.

1995 menisectomy
9/06 menisectomy with resultant blood clot
6/07 meniscal transplant with peroneal nerve damage
12/07 peroneal nerve decompression

Offline sil

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #563 on: January 13, 2008, 06:23:31 AM »
Amanda,

Congratulations on the news of your pregnancy.  What an exciting time for you. 

Mom - still praying for your little girl and hoping improvement will happen soon.

Rosa

Offline mom444

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #564 on: January 17, 2008, 06:21:33 PM »


Mom - still praying for your little girl and hoping improvement will happen soon.

Rosa

Thank you so much Rosa!
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline mom444

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #565 on: January 18, 2008, 07:49:58 PM »
Just blogging.

I am so stressed out about going to Pittsburgh next week.  I never thought it would come to this.

It has been over two years now of tests, surgery, consults, etc. and, above all else, WORRYING about my little girl.  ...All because of something that we never even noticed happening.  No accident, no injury, no pain.

We have no idea how her peroneal nerve ever even got injured.

Just want to thank all of you for your support and especially prayers over this past year or so.  I always go to this site when I feel upset about my daughter and your words and advice help so much.

So, we will spend over six hours driving to PIttsburgh to see this specialist.  We'll miss work, pay for a hotel and rearrange our schedules to do all this...  Sigh.  I hope it's worth it.

There was another study I found last week where a guy had foot drop and it didn't improve ove  a year and they went and did a tendon transfer on him, that gave him bad scarring nonetheless.  The guy had a recovery THREE YEARS later and had to have the tendon transfer reversed.

I am so confused and drained by all this. 

Love you all.
Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline jove

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #566 on: January 21, 2008, 01:59:06 AM »
Hi, I'm new here, and also have the peroneal nerve problem. It was torn in June 2007; repaired with a 3" (7 cm) graft in September 2007. As expected, nothing much to report yet.

 I have a question that maybe some of you can answer. What is Tinel's sign? How does it work, what does it mean? I do know that you are supposed to tap on the surface where the damaged section of the nerve is, and then (if positve) you feel a tingling, or shock, sensation down-stream (distally) from where the tapping is done. I tryed this on myself out of curiosity. It's easy to know where the nerve is, because of the scar there. So when I tap on the scar where the graft was done, (above the back of the knee), I do feel the tingling or shock feeling down the side of my leg, down to the ankle (positive). But if I tap below the graft, I feel nothing (negative).

So I assume (GUESS!!!) that a positive Tinel's sign means the nerve is alive down to the point where the tapping produces a positive, but not below that point. If the nerve regenerates in time, then will tapping lower down (below the grafted section) produce a positive sign?

Thanks in advance if any buddy can provide more information on this.

Offline mom444

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #567 on: January 22, 2008, 01:33:25 AM »
Hi, I'm new here, and also have the peroneal nerve problem. It was torn in June 2007; repaired with a 3" (7 cm) graft in September 2007. As expected, nothing much to report yet.

 I have a question that maybe some of you can answer. What is Tinel's sign? How does it work, what does it mean? I do know that you are supposed to tap on the surface where the damaged section of the nerve is, and then (if positve) you feel a tingling, or shock, sensation down-stream (distally) from where the tapping is done. I tryed this on myself out of curiosity. It's easy to know where the nerve is, because of the scar there. So when I tap on the scar where the graft was done, (above the back of the knee), I do feel the tingling or shock feeling down the side of my leg, down to the ankle (positive). But if I tap below the graft, I feel nothing (negative).

So I assume (GUESS!!!) that a positive Tinel's sign means the nerve is alive down to the point where the tapping produces a positive, but not below that point. If the nerve regenerates in time, then will tapping lower down (below the grafted section) produce a positive sign?

Thanks in advance if any buddy can provide more information on this.

Welcome jove and best wishes in your recovery!

It's funny you ask that, because I've always wondered what a Tinel's sign is also.  Each time I've attempted to look it up, I've never seemed to find anything that truly explains it.

Mother of a now six year old daughter with unexplained peroneal neuropathy/injury to the peroneal nerve resulting in footdrop.  Had surgery 7-06 including neurolysis to remove scar tissue/neuroma.  Wears AFO wtih dorsiflextion assist and is using EMG triggered biofeedback and TES awaiting recovery.

Offline jenswin

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #568 on: January 22, 2008, 02:42:57 PM »
Hi,

I'm new on here - in fact I've never used a forum in my life!!  Anyway I found this site by accident just looking for some info on the nerve decompression surgery I'm having soon.  I decided to write mainly to encourage mom444 with your daughter. 

I'm probably quite a unique case on here but very sound much like your daughter. I'm 26 years old and have right foot drop since about the age of 7 or 8. We have no idea when or how it happened, I had no pain I don't remember noticing anything or ever tripping or even learning to walk differently, I just noticed I couldn't flex my right foot one day. I had numerous doctors appointrments and EMG tests (this was before the days of MRI), I think the diagnosis was that is was a deformity that happened in the womb but they didn't do anything about it other than was sent to a physiotherapist and was given a splint. I then saw a paeditrican once a year up until being 16 and was then discharged.   He did recommend a tendon transplant on my last visit but said I was too young at the time so nothing ever happened.

Although this might not be the encouragement you're after I just wanted to say that even if your daughter does not recover it really is not the end of the world and she can lead a completely normal life - in fact reading some of these stories I think the best time to get it is when you're young as you learn to do every moment with the foot drop and don't have to relearn everything.  To be honest I don't think I could walk normally if I tried! I wore a splint for a couple of weeks when I was 7 but then stopped - I didn't need it and found it restrictive, plus could wear the shoes I wanted to!  I've never used anythign since.  I was a very normal busy active kid and in fact was the most sporty of all my family! I went horse riding, did dance, I took PE at GCSE and was on my school badminton and hockey teams.  I drive a normal manual gearstick car, have a good job, have a masters degree, and have travelled extensively.  My foot drop has hardly restricted me in anything. there are of course some negatives and it has been frustrating at times.  I can't always wear the shoes I want - I'm unbalanced in high stiletto heels cos of the lack of muscle, and shoes without ankle straps just come off my foot. As a fashion-conscious girl that's quite a problem!!!  I struggled on the steeper slopes when I went skiing (but would definitely go again), again cos of poor balance on my right foot - also means I would never be a great ice-skater or ballerina!! It was also quite a funny site when I tried to walk in flippers when I went snorkelling - needless to say I ended up walking backwards  ;D  I also am more likely to go over on that ankle and did tear the ligaments in my ankle when I was 15.  I did get teased a little bit at high school but hardly at all, and now people don't even notice it till I tell them  - at least that's what they say!!  Luckily I have very small feet which does make it less noticeable :)

Your daughter is having tons more treatment, therapy and care than I ever did so I'm sure she has much greater chance of recovery. And being so young it will just seem normal to her the way she walks.

Anyway after 10 years of seeing no one about my leg I managed to get a referral last year to a neurologist, as I have started having pain in my knee, i think becasue I use it and the thigh muscles to balance and it was starting to get sore, and wondered whether I coudl talk about a tendon transfer.  I had all the nerve/EMG tests done all over again where the guy said I may have caused the foot drop by crossing my legs as a kid and that I had to stop doing it now - weird as I'd never heard that before!! I got referred to a top peroneal nerve specialist, had an MRI of my leg and finally got a definitive diagnosis after 20 years!!! There is a swelling on my nerve near the tibial head, am going in for surgery next month to have it removed and a biopsy taken.  He said it might help but after 20 years there is a very small chance it could recover.  After so long it would be quite a weird feeling if it did...!

Which brings me on to the point that I was looking for when I found this site - does anyone know how long recovery is after a decompression surgery and if I'll have a cast on for weeks or anything?  The highly efficient NHS have given me no clue about anything other than a date for admission and what to pack!!!

Hope that helps mom444, of course if I could choose I wouldn't have foot drop but for the most part I don't really think about it.  I totally undertand you being worried about her and really hope that she  does improve, but I hope this reassures you that it won't really hinder her in the future if it doesn't get better.   

Hope all you other people suffering with this manage to recover well, I'll be looking on here for post-op tips for trying to regain muscle/nerve functoin if it's possible.  I didn't get chance to read through all the posts on this section but if there is anyone else out there who is or was in a similar situation to me I'd love to hear from you!!
 

Offline Rhonda J

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Re: Any Peroneal Nerve recovery stories?
« Reply #569 on: January 23, 2008, 03:02:07 AM »
Hello Everyone...

I am sooooo relieved I found you. I had a TKR 2 months ago with the other knee replacment pending. During surgery or while in recovery my peroneal nerve was injured leaving me with no feeling in my leg and foot. My knee is doing great, but I am devistated. Ironically, I had to wait 4 long years for the replacement (with my life on hold) because they kept saying I was too young. I am now 53.

Although I am so sorry to hear your stories, it brings me comfort that I am not alone. My OS is nationally known for treating professional athletes for knee injuries and came highly recommended. However, when he realized there was a complication he quickly stated while running out my hospital room door that it could take months for the feeling to return. There was no explantion of any kind. When I came home from the hospital I began researching TKR complications and became educated on peroneal knee palsy. I could not believe my eyes as I read through the information.

I do have a leg brace which helps me walk more normally. Prior to the brace, I kept tripping and even fell a couple of times. I realize each case of peroneal nerve damage is so different. However, I was wondering if anyone else has had this happen during TKR surgery. I am curious to hear how everything turned out. I am so frustrated, but I am greatful it wasn't worse.

I will continue to follow your stories and I do hope each and everyone of you have success.

Kindest regards,
Rhonda