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Author Topic: Leg extensions bad?  (Read 2504 times)

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Offline footballer

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Leg extensions bad?
« on: May 22, 2005, 01:20:13 PM »
I was planning on signing up to the gym to finally step up training after my knee op (meniscectomy) for next season but I'm now reading on nearly every site how 'bad' leg extensions are for your knee. Is this true and could anyone also tell me what 'do not lock your knees' means because whilst emphasising it, no site actually explains it.

Thanks, you can probably sense my worry!

Offline PattiAnn237

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Re: Leg extensions bad?
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2005, 01:46:13 PM »
I believe that Leg extentions are ok post-op as long as the doc hasn't given you any restrictions.  When they say don;t lock your knees it means to always keep them slightly bent during exercisie.  When you come up on a knee extention don;t straigten the leg all the way.  This keeps the pressure on the quads rather than the joint.  Hope this helps!!  Good luck ~Patti
25 y/o
Left knee- lateral tilt, lateral tracking, arthritis
LR 8/5/04 (failed)
Diagnostic Scope- 5/2/05 (scar tissue removed)
Holding off on TTT till I can get through school!

Offline Beauzer

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Re: Leg extensions bad?
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2005, 02:31:12 PM »
If you've had an ACL reconstruction (at least hammy, I don't know about the other types) and do seated extensions with weights you can pull out your graft, even a long time after (so I was told by several OS and multiple PT).  So that makes me think that they're rather hard on the knees.

Danielle
32 - R knee gone to hell
lat. meniscus 94
ACL, chondroplasty 98
Chondroplasty 99
Screw fell out into joint, med. meniscus, microfracture 99
MCL/med. capsule recon, med. meniscus 00
Chondroplasty 04
Chrondroplasty 1/05
OATS 4/05 for OCD lesion
AVN, MFC fracture 10/05

Offline footballer

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Re: Leg extensions bad?
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2005, 02:50:11 PM »
Thanks for the replies. It shocks me that when I did them on my final physio session the physio was telling me to straighten and hold for a few seconds! 

Is this the best exercise for getting my quads as strong/big as possible, them squats/lunges using weights across your chest look scary to me!

Offline clhimes

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Re: Leg extensions bad?
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2005, 06:09:34 PM »
I was told the leg extensions are too hard on the knees. I have a friend who was having all kinds of knee troubles until she stopped using the leg extension machine. I'm waiting on ACL recon and was told absolutely do NOT do them.  For the quads I use the leg press, where you press your leg against a plate and push yourself back, the bike, and the stairclimber set at a really high resistance so I really have to push.
Chris
48 y/o professor
Feb 13. 2005  skiing injury
Mar 2005 MRI shows ACL rupture, Grade III MCL and Grade II LCL sprains
ACL recon (hamstring) July 28, 2005

Offline footballer

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Re: Leg extensions bad?
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2005, 06:30:46 PM »
Thanks for the advice, I'll probably give the leg extensions a miss and use something else. Im guessing its fine to use the hamstring curls though?

Offline PattiAnn237

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Re: Leg extensions bad?
« Reply #6 on: May 22, 2005, 11:30:07 PM »
yeah I would say the leg press is your best bet.  my PTs love it because they can use it to mimic lifting your own body weight without the extra gravity
25 y/o
Left knee- lateral tilt, lateral tracking, arthritis
LR 8/5/04 (failed)
Diagnostic Scope- 5/2/05 (scar tissue removed)
Holding off on TTT till I can get through school!

Offline blackbeltgirl

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Re: Leg extensions bad?
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2005, 01:04:01 PM »
I may be in the minority here, but I was told no lunges, squats, leg press, or any other "closed chain" exercises.  I am allowed to try leg extensions, as long as I limit the motion to 70 degrees or less.

But I am trying to keep 2 lesions from turning into 1. 

My point - ask your doctor.  My OS was appalled when I told him that they had me doing some of those exercises in PT.  I was very specific - can I do X, Y, Z, etc.  and didn't just ask if I could start strength training.  Think of the main exercises you'd like to do, send an e-mail or make the phone call, and get the answer from the person who tried so hard to fix you.  That way you won't question the decision later.
ACI was supposed to be 2/21/06.  On 6/29/06 Insurance co said have another scope, and if it still looks good, they'll ok the ACI.
Microfracture Dec 7, 2004
   3cm x 6cm lesion, LFC; 3cm x 1cm lesion, trochlear groove; lateral tibial plateau lesion
2nd degree black belt, tae kwon do (had to stop)

Offline ATsoccergirl

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Re: Leg extensions bad?
« Reply #8 on: May 23, 2005, 05:59:03 PM »
As long as you have no complicating factors, leg extensions are safe in your case.  Any kind of ligamentous or patellar dysfunction requires this exercise to modified to protect structures.  For example with a post op ACL the extensions can be done safely in a range of 90 to 60 degrees concentrically or 0 to 90 degrees eccentrically.  This placed little to no stress on the graft.  It's a little more difficult with patellar dysfunction, I generally stick people in a range of about 30-90 degrees.  But this is more dependant on the clinician's thoughts on when there is truly the most compression occuring.  Extensions are a great exercise when done properly, in my opinion it's far better to modify an exercise than to avoid it all together.

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I am assuming that you are a soccer player.  In terms of targeted closed chain activities the isometric extension is one of the best at mimicing and strengthening for kicking.  It will really target the quadreceps.  Combining both an eccentric and concentric contraction will maximize your results and will make it the most functional. 
1999 LR, 2002 ACL/PLC recon, reversal of LR, 2004 ACL revision, 2006 Car accident torn PCL and small fractures resulting in bone chips in my knee.  Torn MCL 3 times.  Wicked screws under IT band and Pes Anserine.  June 2008-Hip Arthroscopy.

Offline footballer

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Re: Leg extensions bad?
« Reply #9 on: May 23, 2005, 07:10:45 PM »
Hi, yeah Im really looking to strengthen up for next season seeing as I missed virtually all of this one!  Just a few basic questions, does anyone have a link to a graph the shows the degrees of flexion and extension of a knee because I get a little confused

Are isometric extensions the leg presses?
what are the main eccentric and concentric contraction exercise I can do? 

I know these questions might take lengthy answers and sound dumb but my physio never mentioned them and now Im training on my own so don't worry about answering them if you haven't the time

Offline ATsoccergirl

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Re: Leg extensions bad?
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2005, 05:49:54 PM »
Isometric leg extensions are the normal extensions which you do in the gym, I just always specifiy since I also have acess to isokinetic equipment. 

A concentric contraction is when the muscle is shortening i.e. the typical contraction, this is achieved during the ROM arc from about 110-0 degree.  An eccentric contraction causes muscle lengthening, this occurs when you return to the starting position of the extenion ~110 degree mark, as long as it's controlled.  So extending and raising the weight is a concentric contraction and then lowing the weight is an eccentric contraction.  The concentric contraction is what puts stress on the joint, which is why an eccentric contraction is okay for post op ACL rehab. 

In terms of ROM 0 is when your knee is completely straight and bending occurs as the degrees go up.  It's actually kind of opposite what it should be, and I have a lot of students struggle with this.  It's not actually the true angle the knee is forming but rather the degrees it has traveled.  I hope that makes sense. 
1999 LR, 2002 ACL/PLC recon, reversal of LR, 2004 ACL revision, 2006 Car accident torn PCL and small fractures resulting in bone chips in my knee.  Torn MCL 3 times.  Wicked screws under IT band and Pes Anserine.  June 2008-Hip Arthroscopy.