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Author Topic: Martial Arts  (Read 47866 times)

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Offline badkneedgal

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #15 on: February 05, 2006, 02:49:36 PM »
Now that you mention it... I do remember that right after the mats went in at our school everone was having difficulty pivoting.  I'm sure that's when the number of knee injuries went up.  As much as I enjoyed MA I think my chances of being injured in class are far greater than ever being injured in an attack.  But then I also know someone very young, early 20's who can barely walk because of years of soccer stress on ankles.  I guess we pick our poison! :)
Osteoarthritis, patellar tracking prblems in both knees, in 1st round of physical therapy
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Offline Limping Welshman

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #16 on: September 04, 2006, 11:21:47 PM »
Hi guys!

I realise that im a good 7 months from your origional thread. I only joined recently, i was looking at this post with interest mainly because i also train in martial arts (2nd deg BB taekwondo, 1st Deg BB Korean Kickboxing). I started training at 26, 2 full years after having full reconstructive surgery on my acl which i injured playing rugby.

I have trained for 7.5 years and have a small school, i have not let the surgery or the threat of re injury put me off my training. I have modified my kicking technique to make sure that all the supporting leg work is as correct as possible to minimise pressure on the joint. I do not avoid sparring, infact i had a silver medal at the European kickboxing Champs in 2004 and competed in Greece for the world champs this year. I wear my donjoy legend brace religously. I think if you train safe then there is no reason why you cannot train in the above martial arts.

However, there are systems that are brilliant to study that require a minimum of kicking. Kali or the philipino styles are great along with some of the chinese systems. I have studied some Kali and JKD and find them great with little or no high or jumping kicks! Sorry to waffle on! hope this helps, nice to meet you all


Owen
Snapped ACL left leg (rugby) 1991
4 meniscal repairs while waiting for MRI
Acl recon 1997 (patella tendon)
Infection post op (3 more athroscopic jobbies)
lcl sprain to right knee (incorrect diagnosis)
Right acl snapped August 06
ACLR To right knee (hamstring) June 7th 07

Offline mbr20

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2007, 11:12:19 PM »
I have recently discovered Qigong. There are apparently many types however I am doing mine through a Self Defence Centre which teaches Yiquan Kungfu. My understanding is that Qigong focuses on breathing, energy and strengthening ligaments, improving joints, mobility etc., but has its basis in training for battle. They also teach it to the aged, people in wheel chairs etc, so very adaptable.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2007, 07:57:55 AM by mbr20 »
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Offline Aff

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2008, 05:02:19 PM »
i do traditional ju jitsu and received my injury from running.  now however i'm in rehab and am looking at a return sometime in the next few months.

but this time i will start to check more closely my form and whether breakfalls (falling on your back) affects my knees.  some can have quite heavy impact, but it doesn't hurt, taht's the point of breakfalling.

but i am very aware of my condition and hope to practice safely.

one thing though is there is no competition in this club.  my jitsu club before had and kickboxing, karate, etc which i did previously did.

so possibly this is one good thing as there's nothing like the thrill of competition to let you forget all about your sore knee as you bash it about.  only for the adrenaline to wear off and you realise you've done yourself an injury.

at the height of my gloom i was considering tai chi, but now i hope to get back to jitsu for a few more years, maybe more :)  there's also the weapons katas of aikido (sticks) which is great fun.

so what i'm saying is, there's a MA for everyone, just use your judgement and be sensible.

Offline jinquan

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2010, 01:52:37 AM »
i do traditional ju jitsu and received my injury from running.  now however i'm in rehab and am looking at a return sometime in the next few months.

but this time i will start to check more closely my form and whether breakfalls (falling on your back) affects my knees.  some can have quite heavy impact, but it doesn't hurt, taht's the point of breakfalling.

but i am very aware of my condition and hope to practice safely.

one thing though is there is no competition in this club.  my jitsu club before had and kickboxing, karate, etc which i did previously did.

so possibly this is one good thing as there's nothing like the thrill of competition to let you forget all about your sore knee as you bash it about.  only for the adrenaline to wear off and you realise you've done yourself an injury.

at the height of my gloom i was considering tai chi, but now i hope to get back to jitsu for a few more years, maybe more :)  there's also the weapons katas of aikido (sticks) which is great fun.

so what i'm saying is, there's a MA for everyone, just use your judgement and be sensible.

yes, I have some aikido practice, actually it is mainly for kids and teenagers, but aikido will do fine if you don't want heavy falling and kicking. or else as I saw someone suggested to do yoga. it is great if you (I mean everyone) can do yoga in the morning. I am wiling to try it, but I haven't found a good instructor.

Offline Debban

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #20 on: April 21, 2011, 06:18:06 PM »
I tore my ACL getting my 1st degree black belt in Wado Ryu karate (it was an unfortunate accident), 3 years ago when I was 45 yrs old.  I had been doing karate for 11 years and was a serious cross country runner for many years before that.  The surgeon told me, after the ACL operation, that I had "a teenagers knee," and that the joint surfaces were "pristine."  So, one can conclude that it's not necessarily the martial arts per se that causes osteoarthritis.  However, after ACL reconstruction, I've decided not to go back to karate and risk further knee problems.  One of my younger karate club mates continues to compete in fighting with bad knees, and her osteoarthritis is so bad now that she will probably have to replace both knees by the time she's 50.
I now stick to biking, gym, elliptical and light jogging... and so far, so good.  But, if you really want to continue with MA, a softer, more individual form (like some of the suggestions in previous posts) might be best.

Offline nycheliskier

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2012, 02:22:27 AM »
I was just diagnosed with Stage 4 arthritis in my patellas. I was having pain, but I had no idea that would be my diagnosis. I am a 3rd degree black belt in Taekwondo and I love to heli-ski. Have these sports caused my arthritis? Should I give them both up? I wear braces which help a bit. If I have a patella replacement, do I have to give up Taekwondo and heli-skiing forever? What sports would I be able to do besides swimming? Also, how long does a patella replacement last?
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 02:42:29 AM by nycheliskier »

Offline carty

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2012, 07:41:20 AM »
I did martial art on and off. My only real knee in jury (patella luxation) came from there. Flying kick....

Now I also was diagnosed grade 3 arthritis on my right kneecap. It was not just martial arts, actually I took it easy there. Yet, I did lots of sports and if you have severe maltracking arthitis is coming. I'm just 32 years old.

Now I plan to start Tai Chi Quan. I spoke to the master and he told me it would be okay to stay high. It would not ruin the Tai Chi. That is the most important for arthritis in the femoropatella joint and which is not possible in Kung Fu and Karate.
I loved weapon training in Kung Fu. Well....

The Master of my Kung Fu Club said, he would also allow me to progress, if I can't stay as low as is normallly required in that style, but my problem is, how can I sustain training sessions? There would be so much I couldn't do in warm up, all that running, jumping, squats...
Many techniques just requiere that deep stance in order to  have a solid stable foundation for the string forces you are generatung with your arms and weapons, due to extremly quick movement.
I think I will give it up...

I don't want to make things worse than they are already......
Hopefully I can cope with Tai Chi and stick to that for longer.


Offline What a pain in the

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #23 on: August 12, 2012, 08:33:10 PM »
Having had a major knee injury (TPF with hardware and PCL tear) 15 years ago I was relatively problem free until 2010. For 3 years previous I had been practicing MMA, and when I did develop problems my physio told me this was pretty much the worst sport I could be doing with a bad knee - specifically because of the extra weight bearing when twisting and lifting that comes with wrestling, and the constant kicking of pads and heavy bags with the shin, which wears on the patello-feoral cartilege (certainly in my case there the femur was too loose against this surface).

Had I known what I know now I would never have done the sport, but I would say of the MAs that I know well, you're probably safest with boxing.  Not everyone's cup of tea but great for fitness and self defence, and not nearly as hard on the knees as repetitive kicking.

Offline D_Morgan

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #24 on: September 29, 2012, 11:38:57 AM »
Well I am not sure about the usefulness of martial arts in Knee arthritis but it is over all very good exercise for strength and fitness as well . So it is right to consult the doctor before going for such type of exercise which is hard to get .
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Offline Kaputt_Knee

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Re: Martial Arts
« Reply #25 on: September 29, 2012, 12:37:06 PM »
D_Morgan,

Do you specialise in giving obtuse, vague "advice" in poorly constructed sentences? Or are you preparing to launch a diet of spam on to the poor sufferers of osteoarthritis? So far you have posted 8 times, and each time what you have written barely makes any sense or is even remotely helpful.

 ::)
1989 big trauma R. knee - sorted
1990-2004 3ACL recons and 20+ arthroscopies -RK
3/06 LK ACL torn!
4/06 ACL recon, kneecap broken
09 &10/06- 2x meniscus trims
3/07 - Notch Plastic & Lateral Release
14/8/08 complete revision ACL plus LCL/PLC recon
6/2/09 returned to skiing! Whoopee

Offline Jeremybult

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Martial Arts
« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2015, 12:11:47 AM »
Oh look, that discussion again. Most if not all martial arts teacher will tell you to rather run away than to get into a serious fight, and maybe some will show the moves of their discipline they think applicable when you really have to defend yourself, but self-defense really isnt in the center of the matter that much. Martial arts are primarily a way to develop yourself, physically and mentally, and to compete with other people using the competition to further improve yourself. It really doesnt matter which martial arts you do as long as youre having fun with it and use it to improve yourself and all the "what about fighting in the streets for real?" talk is redundant.















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