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Author Topic: What is grade three  (Read 1065 times)

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Offline amy1

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What is grade three
« on: April 20, 2005, 04:50:03 AM »
I have pattlofemoral syndrome in both knees. Grade three in three compartments, knee tilt, dislocation and of course that lovely snap crackle pop ound when I walk, go up stairs,stand etc. I am guessing the larger the number......the worse the grade  What does grade three reall mean?
6/2004 partial lateral meniscus removal and microfracture left knee
7/13/05  open lateral release, medial plication, spur removal right knee
12/06  re do proximal realignment right knee (scar tissue formed ) 5 days post op - fell and fractured elbow
08/2009 - feeling good so far work 50 hrs a week

shadehawk

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Re: What is grade three
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2005, 04:32:58 PM »
Amy,

Do you have chondromalacia or OA?  The different grades are like you mentioned - the worse the condition the higher the grade. 

http://www.wcb.ab.ca/providers/medref03.asp

Shade
« Last Edit: April 20, 2005, 04:35:02 PM by Shade »

Offline amy1

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Re: What is grade three
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2005, 06:06:37 PM »
I have chondromalacia. I also have OA.  Is that common?
6/2004 partial lateral meniscus removal and microfracture left knee
7/13/05  open lateral release, medial plication, spur removal right knee
12/06  re do proximal realignment right knee (scar tissue formed ) 5 days post op - fell and fractured elbow
08/2009 - feeling good so far work 50 hrs a week

shadehawk

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Re: What is grade three
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2005, 06:34:40 PM »
Osteoarthritis (Degenerative Joint Disease)- Arthritis of middle age characterized by degenerative and sometimes hypertrophic changes in the bone and cartilage of one or more joints and a progressive wearing down of opposing joint surfaces with consequent distortion of joint positioning usually without bony stiffening.

Think that chondromalacia can progress into OA.
















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