Banner - Hide this banner





Author Topic: what is grade 2 instability?  (Read 1900 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline andybad knee

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Liked: 0
what is grade 2 instability?
« on: February 02, 2005, 09:08:43 PM »
fell over and nakered my right knee while on delivery 2 years ago. knee has been wobly ever since front to back. it was in a full leg pot for 4 weeks when i first did it. had arthroscopy in november which concluded that  acl not torn but very lax wiv grade 2 instability? any ideas?

Offline smiley196

  • SuperKNEEgeek
  • *****
  • Posts: 1712
  • Liked: 0
  • *I love soccer...miss you girls*
Re: what is grade 2 instability?
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2005, 09:24:34 PM »
Im not quite sure what your question is asking, but perhaps you should wear a brace to help with the insatability? My knee is very instable and gives out ALL the time...even just walking sometimes. Im just guessing but maybe grade 2 instability is when your ACL is not torn but still gives out?
*16 years old*
Left Knee:
Torn:PCL, ACL, MCL
SEVERAL dislocations
Grade 3 Chondromalacia
Medial & Lateral Meniscus tears
Plica Syndrome
Sept 14th 2005-(LK)ACL recon, TTT, menisectomy,plica removal

May 26th/06-Torn ACL(RK)

June 14th/06-(LK)ACL graft recon, screw removal, menisectomy

Offline Lizzie - UK

  • SuperKNEEgeek
  • *****
  • Posts: 897
  • Liked: 0
  • Fibromyalgia diagnosed Dec 2003 - OA in both knees
    • E30 Zone
Re: what is grade 2 instability?
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2005, 09:31:19 PM »
A ligament is a tissue anywhere in the body that connects one bone to another. Within the knee, four ligaments stabilize the joint: the Posterior Cruciate Ligament, the Medial and Lateral Collateral Ligaments, and the Anterior Cruciate Ligament, or ACL. This details what occurs when your ACL tears, either completely or partially. An injury to the ACL or any other ligament is known as a "sprain," or, more commonly, a "tear" when it is most severe.


The ACL runs from the back of the femur, or thighbone, to the front of the tibia, or shinbone, and prevents the tibia from moving too far forward. The most common mechanism of injury to the ACL is a twisting or cutting motion, which stretches or tears the ligament. The injury can happen in one of three "grades":


Grade 1, in which the ligament is stretched, but not torn.

Grade 2, where the ACL is partially torn.

Grade 3, in which the ACL is completely torn and instability, or looseness of the joint, occurs.

Depending upon the level of activity of the individual, an orthopedic surgeon may recommend operating or pursuing conservative methods to manage the ACL tear. An ACL tear is often accompanied by a tear of the Medial Collateral Ligament or meniscus.

I hope that this helps clarify a few things.

Kind regards ... Lizzie xx

Past History of L&R Knee
Bilateral OA
Medial Meniscal Tears
Lateral Releases & Medial Reefings
Ruptured LCL, MCL & PCL
Adhesions in the interconylar notch of ACL removed
Suprapatella plication
Debridements/Lavages
Deep chondral fissure in crest of patella
Awaiting MRI - LK
TKR - RK

Offline andybad knee

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Liked: 0
Re: what is grade 2 instability?
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2005, 09:38:58 PM »
Hi Lizzie

Many thanks for replying - that seems to make sense thank you. The surgeon did say he was wary of the lateral movement also. By the way i'm a postman and still don't know if it is wise to go back on delivey?

Offline Lizzie - UK

  • SuperKNEEgeek
  • *****
  • Posts: 897
  • Liked: 0
  • Fibromyalgia diagnosed Dec 2003 - OA in both knees
    • E30 Zone
Re: what is grade 2 instability?
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2005, 10:14:03 PM »
Hi Andy

Firstly, I suppose going back to deliveries depends upon how you feel about going back.  I would also check with your GP/OS to see what they have to say. 

Some people can go on with an ACL tear without having any surgical intervention.  It really depends on the structure of your knee and how stable it is.  If it is unstable, it will give way more and more and I would think that it would be best to brace the knee to prevent any futher injury.

I wish you well.

Take care ... Lizzie xx
Past History of L&R Knee
Bilateral OA
Medial Meniscal Tears
Lateral Releases & Medial Reefings
Ruptured LCL, MCL & PCL
Adhesions in the interconylar notch of ACL removed
Suprapatella plication
Debridements/Lavages
Deep chondral fissure in crest of patella
Awaiting MRI - LK
TKR - RK

Offline andybad knee

  • MICROgeek (<20 posts)
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Liked: 0
Re: what is grade 2 instability?
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2005, 09:21:59 PM »
thank you 4 ur help! andy















support