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Author Topic: What exactly is a CPM machine?  (Read 4834 times)

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Offline XxSkittlezxX

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What exactly is a CPM machine?
« on: August 22, 2004, 11:37:57 PM »
There was another question on what a CPM machine was and I got that it worked your knee, but ... do you carry it around with you?  They said that you had to be on it 24/7 for about a week?  Well I plan on going back to school with in a week of my surgery, how's that gonna work?

Thanx for your help!
1/15/04 = ACL Rupture (fully torn)
11/17/04 = ACL Recon. Surgery

Offline Heather M.

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Re: What exactly is a CPM machine?
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2004, 01:08:28 AM »
No, this is not a portable machine by any stretch of the imagination.  On crutches you will have difficulty getting it from room to room without help--it's big and bulky.

The goal of the machine is to bend and straighten your leg without using your muscles--you are strapped in and along for the ride.  That means the exercise is passive, which will keep irritation down.  The goal is to prevent the formation of scar tissue.  YOU DO NOT WANT SCAR TISSUE TO FORM IN YOUR KNEE.  Period.  It is crippling.

If your doctor wants you in a CPM it is for a good reason.  If you can't follow the post-op protocol at this time, you need to talk to your doctor about it beforehand.  There's no point in having a lot of the procedures done out there if you can't follow the rehab regimen, because it can leave you in worse shape than going into the surgery.  Or it can just prolong your recovery.  Either way, it's not good to go into the surgery with the idea that you can't follow the protocol.  Find out from your doctor what it is, explain your work or school limitations, and see what kind of solution you can come up with.  Your doctor needs to have all the information about your situation so that he/she can work with you to decide the best option.

So in answer to your question about how a CPM 24/7 would work if you plan on going back to school...it won't.  But if you go back too early, you are really risking doing yourself more harm than good.  You only get two knees!  Don't set yourself up for a tough rehab because of unrealistic expectations about the recovery.  After my first surgery, which of the 7 procedures I've had was absolutely the 'easiest' recovery, I went back to living alone and doing all my life activities at 6 days post-op.  I was miserable and in a lot of pain.  I wish I'd just chilled for a while, but my OS said that I'd be 'fine' in a week or two, and back into the gym in about a month.  Puh-lease.  It was 4 months before I could even walk on a treadmill.

Your recovery is really going to depend on your age, your shape going into surgery, what surgery you have, what the state of your knee is on the inside, and pure luck.  I've seen people do nothing but the barest minimum for rehab and be fine in a week (my older brother, darn him!).  I've seen others do everything, to PT exercises four times a day, make rehab their top priority...and they have every setback in the book.  It's a matter of your doctor's skill, your knee situation inside (if you have a lot of arthritic damage to the articular cartilage it often takes longer to recover), and what your problem is.  And then just cross your fingers, do what the doctor tells you, and hope for the best.

Above all, a positive attitude and 'can-do' approach to PT will take you very far.  That doesn't mean overdoing it and getting back too early!  Keep your spirits up and follow your instructions, try to get into PT as soon as humanly possible (make the appointment BEFORE your surgery as sometimes there are delays) and stay in the CPM as long as your doctor tells you to.  I was in it 18-20 hours a day because I had to go to formal PT twice each day and it took 30 mins to get there and I wasn't on the CPM while I was there.  But other than that, I was on it non-stop, even for sleeping.  I'm convinced it helped in my recovery, keeping the scar tissue at bay and keeping the knee loose and limber.

Heather
Scope #1: LR, part. menisectomy w/cyst, chondroplasty
#2-#5: Lysis of adhesions/scar tissue, AIR, patellar tendon debridement, infections, MUA, insufflation
#6: IT band release / Z-Plasty, synovectomy, LOA/AIR, chondroplasty
2006 Arthrofibrosis, patella baja
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hmaxwell

Offline Heather M.

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Re: What exactly is a CPM machine?
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2004, 01:14:41 AM »
PS here's a great link on ACL injury, deciding which treatment approach is best for you, and the surgery options.  There's a lot of good information on recovery on the first two links--the first is actually a sample protocol.
http://www.carletonsportsmed.com/front.htm
http://www.steadman-hawkins.com/acl/overview.asp

Here's another megalink page--it has links to tons of great, detailed ACL info on the web:
http://www.carletonsportsmed.com/front.htm

You should also go to the General Info link at the top of this page and click on the links for cruciate ligaments.  There is a LOT of info and numerous very good links for further reading.

You are taking a big step by fixing the ACL problem, and I know you will do great--so many people are so thankful they have had the reconstruction!  Your knee was meant to work with an ACL, and if you are active, getting it fixed is a no-brainer.  I'm sure you will do great, just pick the doctor carefully and block out a 3-6 month period in your life where you will be focused on getting that knee back to full strength.  You won't be disabled that long by any means, but you will have to do PT daily and start slowly.  So don't do the surgery 2 months before your planned start to a yearlong backpacking trip in the mountains or something!  

Hope this helps.  You'll do fine if you educate yourself and apply your energy to getting better.  My roomie had her ACL reconstructed four years after her complete tear, and the difference in her life once she recovered was night and day.  She can do anything she wants now--her ACL recon knee is stronger than the other one!
« Last Edit: August 23, 2004, 01:17:40 AM by hmaxwell »
Scope #1: LR, part. menisectomy w/cyst, chondroplasty
#2-#5: Lysis of adhesions/scar tissue, AIR, patellar tendon debridement, infections, MUA, insufflation
#6: IT band release / Z-Plasty, synovectomy, LOA/AIR, chondroplasty
2006 Arthrofibrosis, patella baja
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hmaxwell

Offline XxSkittlezxX

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Re: What exactly is a CPM machine?
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2004, 01:22:53 AM »
Oh wow, hmm... sounds complicated.  Maybe my doctor doesn't use CPM machines and rely's heavily on PT.  He said that he usually does surgery's on Wednesdays, you're out of school for Thursday and sometimes Friday and you're usually back to school by Monday.  Maybe my surgery wouldn't require a CPM machine.  (That'd be nice!)  

Your recovery is really going to depend on your age, your shape going into surgery, what surgery you have, what the state of your knee is on the inside, and pure luck.  I've seen people do nothing but the barest minimum for rehab and be fine in a week (my older brother, darn him!).  I've seen others do everything, to PT exercises four times a day, make rehab their top priority...and they have every setback in the book.  It's a matter of your doctor's skill, your knee situation inside (if you have a lot of arthritic damage to the articular cartilage it often takes longer to recover), and what your problem is.  And then just cross your fingers, do what the doctor tells you, and hope for the best.

Well, I'm 17 years old... I was at PT for 3 months and then continued with lacrosse and am now into the marching band season.  That might be risking it, but the PT people say that my quads and hamstrings are strong enough that I can most likely make it through the whole marching band season... I did with the lax season.  My doctor says that it's up to me on whether or not I get surgery.  I'll go through ACL Reconstruction Surgery with the B-P-T-B graft, I guess... is that the best one?  I've heard it's the strongest.  As far as what my knee looks like inside, I couldn't tell you.  And I do not rely on luck... I have none!
1/15/04 = ACL Rupture (fully torn)
11/17/04 = ACL Recon. Surgery

Offline Shiinshi

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Re: What exactly is a CPM machine?
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2004, 09:21:24 PM »
The CPM should compliment the PT (IMHO), it also worked great for me, and helped me move my leg, when I couldn't.

Take care and good luck.
10/04 - RK, ACL allograft recon/ partial lateral meniscectomy.
            
01/05- RK, PFS and venous deficiencies
- Still could be more, but still don't want to ask!

Offline XxSkittlezxX

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Re: What exactly is a CPM machine?
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2004, 09:54:37 PM »
I figured it out!  My doctor does not use a CPM machine cause he's worried more about extension than flexion, as... when I get out of this stupid stupid immobilizer on Monday (I'm one week post op as of yesterday) I will have around 90 degree's flexion and full extension!!

Thanks guys!!!
1/15/04 = ACL Rupture (fully torn)
11/17/04 = ACL Recon. Surgery

Offline Shiinshi

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Re: What exactly is a CPM machine?
« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2004, 08:49:01 PM »
BTW, my doc was also worried about my ROM (extension + flexsion).  Since my injury did not permit me to completely straighten my knee, he was primarily worried about my extension.  The CPM parameters can be set to 0 (actually is should read like -12 on the machines but it's the true 0 to look at), all the way up to if I remember 120 or something like that.

How's the PT treating you so far?

Happy healing all, take care and good luck.
10/04 - RK, ACL allograft recon/ partial lateral meniscectomy.
            
01/05- RK, PFS and venous deficiencies
- Still could be more, but still don't want to ask!