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I'm so glad that you had such a fantastic recovery. Thanks for the write-up. I'm trying to strengthen my quads too and it's working. The knee is getting better.
2
My knee doctor diagnosed me with stage II knee osteoarthritis in 2014. He recommended three rehabilitation exercises, one of which is to strengthen the quads.

I started doing the quads exercise every day.

In the 2016 annual follow-up clinic, the doctor told me that the space between my femur and tibia was wider--not narrower--than a year before. He suggested that my knees had grown some new cartilage--a phenomenon that he has seen often, but only in patients on whom he had performed arthroscopic surgeries (and I have never had a knee surgery of any kind.)

It is nice that the worn cartilage in my knees has grown back, but what matters even more to me is that my knees have since bothered me less and less, and I have been able to jog without pain.

The exercise that my doctor recommented has helped me achieved this improvements in my knees. I appreciate his suggestions, and I have also become more curious about cartilage regrowth and about his arthroscopic knee surgery.

That curiosity has led me to learn much more about my knee doctor, his arthroscopic surgery, and the tens of thousands of patients who have consequently saved their knees from knee replacement. I will post more later on these findings.

For now, I just wanted to point out what strengthened quads have done for me:
1.Wider space between femur and tibia in my knees

2.Less knee pains or discomfoat

3.Running without pain
3
Quizzes, games & fun contests / Re: Word game
« Last post by 60schld on January 20, 2019, 10:28:20 PM »
grilled
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Quizzes, games & fun contests / Re: Word game
« Last post by John42 on January 20, 2019, 10:26:41 PM »
(ed) steak
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Could it be a nerve issue? Have you ever seen a neurologist or neurophysiologist? Or even a sports psychologist if there isnít a clear anatomical issue. I can see why an orthopaedist might be the wrong specialist for you in terms of diagnosis if the bones arenít the issue

I have seen a neurologist. No psychologist. But I have objective symptoms which prove it's not all in my mind. Tendon damage, including the partial tear in 2003 or 2005. And visual changes to the shape of my muscles as I have showed here and other visual changes which correlate to how my quads feel dead.
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Could it be a nerve issue? Have you ever seen a neurologist or neurophysiologist? Or even a sports psychologist if there isnít a clear anatomical issue. I can see why an orthopaedist might be the wrong specialist for you in terms of diagnosis if the bones arenít the issue
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The only thing here is the top orthopaedic surgeon tend to be (super) specialised on one or two joints and even a very specific aspect of that joint. So it's necessary to find the right specialist for your issue regardless of where they practice or a specialism that has a more holistic overview (in my case, I'm under an msk expert rheumatologist as well as specialists for whatever joint is ailing me most at that point). A sports specialist or a super specialist physio might also be appropriate

What issues do you have other than tight quads? How severe is the knee pain, how is your daily function. It's good you can lunge and kneel, I've not been able to do either comfortably since injuring my knee

Pain isn't my problem. My problem my legs feel like they are on backwards or just very misaligned. I am highly functional, but function reliably leads to injury. My quad tendons are in a state of active degradation. Sometimes they get painful, but mostly they feel fragile, like they are in an active state of fraying apart, sometimes warm to the touch. My quads don't work right. They are very weak for their size I believe due to alignment. I can run, play touch football very aggressively, but I can't do any leg specific workouts without damaging the quad tendons. Every step I take is frustrating because my legs feel so out of alignment.
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The only thing here is the top orthopaedic surgeon tend to be (super) specialised on one or two joints and even a very specific aspect of that joint. So it's necessary to find the right specialist for your issue regardless of where they practice or a specialism that has a more holistic overview (in my case, I'm under an msk expert rheumatologist as well as specialists for whatever joint is ailing me most at that point). A sports specialist or a super specialist physio might also be appropriate

What issues do you have other than tight quads? How severe is the knee pain, how is your daily function. It's good you can lunge and kneel, I've not been able to do either comfortably since injuring my knee
9
That's not been my experience over the years, but I'm maybe lucky to be in a very large city with a dozen top class teaching hospitals within 30 miles

I have visited top hospitals in the US, for instance Hospital for Special Surgery and that is my experience there. Although I have a subtle and complex problem. But still, they look at imaging for 10 minutes and see me for 20 minutes. That's ridiculous.
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That's not been my experience over the years, but I'm maybe lucky to be in a very large city with a dozen top class teaching hospitals within 30 miles

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