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Author Topic: ACL hamstring reconstruction: 10-week update  (Read 528 times)

Offline Hill Girl

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ACL hamstring reconstruction: 10-week update
« on: June 02, 2017, 12:52:07 PM »
Hello

Promised to update after seeing my surgeon this week for my 10 week review. Graft seems "solid" (or words to that effect, though I will only believe that once I really start testing it next year!), wounds have healed nicely, ROM satisfactory.

Going forward, after the three month mark (I think this is defined by him as 16 weeks to be on safe side) I am okay to start twisting (I've been super careful in office, kitchen etc where there are so many changes of direction) though real twisting as in sporting twisting is to be avoided for longer/until rehab targets/timelines for return to sport are complete.  No deep squatting for one year. 

Seemed more relaxed about the 3 month to one year phase than I had expected, though this may be because he's clocked I'm now "old and wise" and have been through some of this before (recovery from original rupture, recovery from meniscetomy) and am therefore familiar with both the exercises and also the need to let the body heal and muscles get properly strong again.  There again it may be because he thinks I'm so old (not quite 50!) that I'll be winding down my activity levels rather than back up ...  Also, although I do a lot of activity it's not contact or ball sports.

So my plan for the rest of this year is lots of cycling (I'm cleared to start this outside now - but don't fall off! I might wait a few more weeks), gradually build up to longer walks and some gentle running on trails, avoiding steep and rough ground/mountains per se until I'm strong enough, return to yoga (not my full ashtanga sequence at first!) and top-roping/seconding/sport climbing (avoiding deep weighted flexion and twisting postures/positions and any leading I would say until next year).  I'm going to leave competitive orienteering until next year too because it's particularly demanding terrain-wise, especially as you tend not to be able to look at your feet as you're so busy deciphering your map and planning your route between controls!

I hope this is useful for anyone coming onto the forum who is considering/due to have or has just had the same surgery - with the usual caveat that everyone's experience will vary, procedures will vary, condition of knee will vary and rehab protocols/surgeons' and physios' instructions will vary!

Best wishes.
Mar 2006 ACL rupture skiing.  Bone bruise.  No ACLR - lots of rehab got me back to the hills.

Feb 2016 Medial meniscus bucket handle tear left knee, c75% removed.

ACLR (hamstring autograph) 03/17

Patellofemoral/trochlear wear in the other knee

Offline Hill Girl

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Re: ACL hamstring reconstruction: 10-week update
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2017, 12:55:18 PM »
Meant to say, I'm still under physio care and following a rehab protocol!
Mar 2006 ACL rupture skiing.  Bone bruise.  No ACLR - lots of rehab got me back to the hills.

Feb 2016 Medial meniscus bucket handle tear left knee, c75% removed.

ACLR (hamstring autograph) 03/17

Patellofemoral/trochlear wear in the other knee

Offline jeffmc

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Re: ACL hamstring reconstruction: 10-week update
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2017, 11:01:42 PM »
Meant to say, I'm still under physio care and following a rehab protocol!

How are you doing these days?   Sounds like you are on the track for recovery.

I have read a few of your posts and am intrigued as I am a fellow ACL-less coper the past 3 years. I already have some meniscus damage and previously tore my MCL so I am seriously contemplating getting the ACLr even though my day to day activities are pain free. I can play soccer albeit cautiously and followed with soreness. I already took a year off after my initial injury to rehab. I don't know whether I should try that again or get reconstructed and take like 18 months off in the hope of feeling back to normal.

Offline Hill Girl

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Re: ACL hamstring reconstruction: 10-week update
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2017, 03:30:22 PM »
Hi, doing well thanks! I'm nearly 8 months out from the reconstruction and sometimes it feels like a lifetime, other times I realise how much more recovery/strength can yet be achieved and therefore how it's hopefully going to feel even better in another few months/year from now. 

Working hard at my rehab still, and some specialist private physio has been worth the money in that respect. Pretty active again with my various activities and hope to be able to run in the mountains by next year.

The decision to have ACL (after nearly 10 years as a coper) was a very tough one and, as a non-ball sports player, not as clear cut for me as for some people. As you probably read in my other posts, there's an element of regret I didn't have this done sooner as I might have avoided the major meniscus mangle but no use dwelling on that now.

I remember the surgeon saying that don't think of ACLR as giving you a pain free knee, only a stable one. As a mountaineer stability/confidence in my knee was what I was looking for. ACLR takes away the pain caused during and in the aftermath of each episode of instability. What it can't do is take away pain that is from permanent damage in there. 

Good luck with your decision. If you do have ACLR you won't be having 18months off - you won't be doing your normal stuff for a while but it will be a busy time with rehab! However, there is much to learn during this process and I have been focusing on it being a learning experience/new challenge that is making me stronger mentally and physically.
Mar 2006 ACL rupture skiing.  Bone bruise.  No ACLR - lots of rehab got me back to the hills.

Feb 2016 Medial meniscus bucket handle tear left knee, c75% removed.

ACLR (hamstring autograph) 03/17

Patellofemoral/trochlear wear in the other knee

Offline jeffmc

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Re: ACL hamstring reconstruction: 10-week update
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2017, 11:32:01 PM »
Hi, doing well thanks! I'm nearly 8 months out from the reconstruction and sometimes it feels like a lifetime, other times I realise how much more recovery/strength can yet be achieved and therefore how it's hopefully going to feel even better in another few months/year from now. 

Working hard at my rehab still, and some specialist private physio has been worth the money in that respect. Pretty active again with my various activities and hope to be able to run in the mountains by next year.

The decision to have ACL (after nearly 10 years as a coper) was a very tough one and, as a non-ball sports player, not as clear cut for me as for some people. As you probably read in my other posts, there's an element of regret I didn't have this done sooner as I might have avoided the major meniscus mangle but no use dwelling on that now.

I remember the surgeon saying that don't think of ACLR as giving you a pain free knee, only a stable one. As a mountaineer stability/confidence in my knee was what I was looking for. ACLR takes away the pain caused during and in the aftermath of each episode of instability. What it can't do is take away pain that is from permanent damage in there. 

Good luck with your decision. If you do have ACLR you won't be having 18months off - you won't be doing your normal stuff for a while but it will be a busy time with rehab! However, there is much to learn during this process and I have been focusing on it being a learning experience/new challenge that is making me stronger mentally and physically.

Thanks for replying; great perspective. I am only 28, and not ever in 'pain' per say.. just soreness after certain activities along with temporary stiffness. By taking 18 months off I was referring only to soccer games- I love going to the gym, biking outside, swimming, and doing my at home exercises. Most rehab programs give a 12-month return to sport after aclR but long-term I want to keep playing soccer so if I undergo the first surgery of my life I think I would like to give it some extra healing time. Although after a year of no sport I could see my mind changing lol.

My knee feels very stable except when running at high speed and stopping, which is obviously important for soccer. I have adapted quite well (I think) and haven't gotten myself into a situation where my knee has 'given out'. Mostly by being cautious and avoiding contact in certain situations, but I still play hard and have tweaked my knee for sure a few times over the past couple years. I have an appointment with my OS on Dec 8th, first time in 2.5 years since he suggested the conservative route and rehab first. I plan to ask if he thinks I'm still making the smart choice playing soccer on an acl-deficient knee and whether I can get another MRI to evaluate whether I am doing damage at a fast-tracked pace by overcompensating for my lack of acl. Does that make sense?
Feels good to type it out to someone who has actually been there. I know I can get through the rehab, but if surgical techniques are constantly improving it might be worthwhile to wait / cope a bit longer until the risk of complications is even more minimal than now.

Thanks ! Happy healing!


 















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