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Author Topic: ACL surgery: Long-term side effects  (Read 1823 times)

Offline BJanson

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Re: ACL surgery: Long-term side effects
« Reply #15 on: December 25, 2016, 12:04:42 AM »
It was 3 months between injury and surgery because it wasn't convenient to have surgery at the time.  Once the swelling went down I had my ROM I suppose.  I don't think I lost much ROM just from the injury and a few days of swelling (knee was drained and I started anti-inflammatory's two days after surgery), but I didn't measure it either.  I did some weight training and stationary bicycling before surgery, but not an organized  protocol. 

Offline Don_Atlet

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Re: ACL surgery: Long-term side effects
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2016, 04:20:31 PM »
Thanks a lot for coming back on this one, BJanson..

As an update to conclude 2016, now about 4 months post injury: Having exercised for 1.5-2 hours per session every working day for the last 30 days according to a specific plan, I am happy with the progress in terms of strength and coordination. It appears that the muscle tone is stronger now on the injured leg, overcompensating for the dysfunctional ACL. My injured leg is still slightly slower when jumping on one leg and a tad more shaky on the wobbleboard compared to the other side. However, I was able to resolve the issues with the IT band and a few other muscular & tendon issues that caused pain.

Overall, my legs feel great. Standing or walking for a long time does not tire my legs at all. Running is not recommended yet, but I tried it for 30 minutes two weeks ago with no pain whatsoever. Will it be enough to play football again? I do not know and it is probably too early to try. (I am not intending to return to football, anyway.)

Having spoken to a few other patients who had ACL reconstruction, it seems like the conservative treatment (at least here in Germany) is not presented as a viable option by doctors. I am now at the stage where I can say that I do not think about my injured leg most of the time. This was an aspect I was not sure would go away without having surgery.

Thanks for everyone who responded to my posts, I will keep everyone updated in 2017!


Offline jeffmc

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Re: ACL surgery: Long-term side effects
« Reply #17 on: November 09, 2017, 07:52:47 PM »
Thanks a lot for coming back on this one, BJanson..

As an update to conclude 2016, now about 4 months post injury: Having exercised for 1.5-2 hours per session every working day for the last 30 days according to a specific plan, I am happy with the progress in terms of strength and coordination. It appears that the muscle tone is stronger now on the injured leg, overcompensating for the dysfunctional ACL. My injured leg is still slightly slower when jumping on one leg and a tad more shaky on the wobbleboard compared to the other side. However, I was able to resolve the issues with the IT band and a few other muscular & tendon issues that caused pain.

Overall, my legs feel great. Standing or walking for a long time does not tire my legs at all. Running is not recommended yet, but I tried it for 30 minutes two weeks ago with no pain whatsoever. Will it be enough to play football again? I do not know and it is probably too early to try. (I am not intending to return to football, anyway.)

Having spoken to a few other patients who had ACL reconstruction, it seems like the conservative treatment (at least here in Germany) is not presented as a viable option by doctors. I am now at the stage where I can say that I do not think about my injured leg most of the time. This was an aspect I was not sure would go away without having surgery.

Thanks for everyone who responded to my posts, I will keep everyone updated in 2017!

How are you feeling, Don?  I am a fellow coper who tore my ACL/MCL/meniscus 3 years ago. rehabbed for a year and have been playing soccer for the last 2 years. The knee gets sore still after intense exercise and I have issues with a lingering bakers cyst when kneeling but day to day stuff is just fine.

Really worried about developing early arthritis and doing further fast-tracked damage by playing soccer on my acl deficient knee. contemplating surgery next year as I have no plans to stop playing soccer, hence how I came across your story. Cheers.

 















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