Author Topic: Clipless pedals  (Read 14375 times)

Offline crumblingknee

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Clipless pedals
« on: February 27, 2009, 04:12:31 AM »
Hi,
I have been bicycling as a means of rehabilitating my gimpy knee. I wish to switch from toe clip pedals  to clipless snap in pedals & shoes with cleats. (I am likely to go with SpeedPlay Frogs).  I will need a fitting to get the shoes, cleats, etc. fitted at my local bike shop. As a person with a bad knee, what should I look for in a proper fitting?
Thanks,
Neil.

Offline Marjan

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Re: Clipless pedals
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2009, 03:16:26 AM »
Ah, clipless pedals.........had to give those up....couldn't handle even the slightest sideways torque to release them.  However, that was my problem.  I would suggest that you not buy any until you get to try them, and then try releasing them while you are in the power stroke with your affected knee, while going at a decent speed.  A good store will let you try any and all models.  Good luck, and good riding!

marjan

Offline debbieo

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Re: Clipless pedals
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2009, 10:44:55 PM »
Marjan has some very good advice.
I used clipless snap in pedals and shoes with cleats in spin classes. I also  had to take my foot out of the shoe to unclip it from the pedal. Like Marjan I couldn't handle the sideways torque release.
That probably was not a good idea even on a stationary bike. But silly me never thought of that till I read Marjan's reply.
Even  on a stationary bike I have seen situations where you should be able to uncip immediately. One time when my husband was in full stoke working hard--the whole pedal mechanism -thingee came off.
I do have to say I did get a better work out with the cleats. Pulling up in the stroke was a different experience.
Thanks Marjan--if I can ever do spin again (tkr 9-14-090 I will seriously--reconsider my shoes!!!!
debbieo
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Offline Pulse

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Re: Clipless pedals
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2010, 11:25:23 AM »
I have bad knees. Clipless pedals are fine but when you get shimano (which has minimal float) then you should adjust it carefully.
I have tested bebop pedals with free float, but since I'm a country cross rider/marathon and I race I expect good performance. Bebop pedals made my knees hurt.
Then I switched to time attack xs pedals (medium range of float) and I'm happy with it.

Offline NikkiE

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Re: Clipless pedals
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2010, 11:47:54 PM »
No problems with knee pain on releasing the clip (when it does release), but painful when you can't release and have a clip stack!
Chondromalacia in right knee for 13 years. 

OA in medial section of right knee, almost bone on bone.

OA in medial section of left knee

Offline mtnbikcowboy

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Re: Clipless pedals
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2010, 12:08:34 AM »
Pulse has it right.  You just need to make sure you are adjusted correctly.  You may find that if the adjustment is there, to move the seat back for a longer headset to seatpost length.  I have my spd's set a bit looser than before my pkr. 
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Offline BellaVega

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Re: Clipless pedals
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2010, 07:46:42 PM »
I would definitely test them out before buying. I have bad knees too and it hurt to turn my foot outward to release from the pedals. You can adjust the float on them so that it's easier to get out of but then you risk accidentally releasing from just a slight turn. I ended up going back to regular pedals. The worst part was the longer I rode the sorer my knees got and the more pain it was to get out of the clipless pedals.
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Offline mtb

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Re: Clipless pedals
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2013, 09:34:10 PM »
For those who want to use clipless, I suggest Time pedals. They have a few mm's of lateral float which is friendlier for the knee compared to Shimano, Crank Brothers or others.

Personally I prefer flat pedals with 5.10 shoes (very, very grippy), but YMMV. I like to be able to bail out when needed.

I strongly recommend any cyclist/mountainbiker spends time for proper bike fitting. This is absolutely essential! If you ride a lot, get a professional to do this for you, you'll be amazed by the difference (eg. Specialized Body Geometry Fit program). It's not cheap, but I think we all know how valuable our knees are.

Offline millen

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Re: Clipless pedals
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2017, 09:27:52 PM »
+1 for Time Xpresso, also branded as Mavic Zxellium, for road cycling.  They have a lot of adjustment available and I believe 15 deg rotation before releasing.  Remains to be seen if I can manage to unclip after my rehab.  Speedplay are reputedly even kinder to knees but pricier and some say require more maintenance.

I gave up clip-ins in my MTB days - too many 0 mph falls when I couldn't release in time.  But I wouldn't dream of not being clipped-in on a road bike now.  There's an argument that if you do come off, a weak knee is better protected if still clipped-in rather than flailing around with risk of twisting etc. 

 

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