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Author Topic: Frayed Meniscus  (Read 2517 times)

Offline skeetguy

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Frayed Meniscus
« on: January 31, 2007, 07:19:12 PM »
I am a 56yr old male, who exercises (weights and treadmill/stair climber) 3 times/wk. My hobby is competitive clay target shotgun shooting. This involves some slight crouched knee rotation. At a shoot two years ago I developed moderate pain(to point of limping slightly) on the left side of the kneecap on my right knee. Subsequently it subsided before I got an OS and an MRI. The MRI showed slight fraying of the medial meniscus. My OS suggested orthroscopic surgery to repair. Since it was not hurting, I decided against it at that time, he agreed. In the two years since, I have had two cases of minor pain that resolved with anti-inflamatories within a couple of days.

The OS had given me the downside of worst case at that time two years ago.... if I did not get it cleaned up, that I might need a total knee replacement. But since I am extremely active and don't really have any pain, is this a realistic scenario? Am I rolling the dice big time? or does the "if it don't hurt, don't fix it" rule apply here.

I have had orthroscopic surgery on my shoulder for subacrimonal decompression and it was worth it, but I was in constant low level pain from the inflammation, and the recovery was NOT as trivial as the OS had led me to beleive. I had muscle scarring that needed constant stretching out for three months instead of the projected one month to complete recovery. Enough to make me no want to do the knee unless I am really in jeopardy of degeneration.

Offline Ronxski

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Re: Frayed Meniscus
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2007, 02:01:44 AM »
Hi and welcome to the board. I hope you can get the help you need here. I'll start off by asking is the right leg your forward foot or your back plant foot? Twisting motion surely doesn't help an already torn meniscus. Depending on the tears location it can keep tearing.
There is a difference between repair where they suture the torn piece down and a trim and smoothing of the bad part. Given your age and if the tear is on the inner part there is little to no blood supply so a repair is not likely.

MRI's don't show everything involving tears of meniscus . It could be more involved but until they get in there with a scope you can't be sure. Since you really aren't having much pain it's hard to say go ahead and get it taken care of.
If you get swelling or fluid, feel a burning dull knife pain. Feel it catching or locking then it would be good to pursue a scope.

You mentioned the muscle scarring on your shoulder. Were you back to shooting before that 3 month period and was it the shoulder that the gun butt sits in?
I have a buddy in another state that shoots in a trap league and I can't believe the ammount of shots he takes in a week so thats why I was asking about that.

Otherwise you might want to read up on arthrofibrosis on this site. Some folks have a tendency to form scar tissue after surgery that can be an ongoing problem. You might want to mention that to your OS if that is what happened with your shoulder.
Hope this helps you some. Ron
partial meniscus removal, posterior horn of medial meniscus tear,horizontal cleavage type. Dec. O4
Age 56
back to cross country skiing and biking.

Offline skeetguy

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Re: Frayed Meniscus
« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2007, 02:56:10 PM »
Its on the back leg....I have stopped using a deep crouch stance and stand virtually upright now so the twist on the knee is minimalized. The pain, when it comes, is very minor, like a minor sore muscle after working out. No sharp catches (like the initial incident 2 years ago) or burning....just sore to the point of noticeability. A day of not shooting and/or a Relafen and its gone. Doesn't affect my lifting or working out, but those don't involve any knee rotation....and it doesn't hurt more when I shoot...just always there in the background when its active.

The shoulder I had worked on was not my shooting shoulder, and I was shooting in 7 days (OS said 14 but couldn't wait). I had to do a lot of daily stretching to get the extreme motion range back(ie touch between shoulder blades....lie on arm fully extended, etc.)...if it was my shooting shoulder, I imagine it would have taken 2 weeks before I could have shot without noticeable pain....now a guy at my clud had a rotator cuff repaired and he couldn't shoulder a gun for 3 months...of course, that wasn't orthroscopic...

 















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