Haem' means blood and 'arthrosis' means joint so a haemarthrosis is bleeding into a joint.

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Part 3 of a course by Mr (Dr) Adrian Wilson on assessing the severely swollen knee after an injury.

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Part 2 of a course by Mr (Dr) Adrian Wilson on assessing the severely swollen knee after an injury.

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Part 1 of a course by Mr (Dr) Adrian Wilson on assessing the severely swollen knee after an injury.

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There are two types of haemarthrosis – one is a mild one that follows surgery that has approximately 25cc in the joint - that does not need draining.

The moderate haemarthrosis where you have 50cc in the joint definitely needs draining because it will shut down your quadriceps and your...

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