A cruciate ligament is a large ligament right in the middle of the knee.

There are two cruciate ligaments (anterior and posterior) and they are very important structures, connecting the thighbone (femur) and the shinbone (tibia).

The word 'cruciate' means 'crossed', referring to the fact that the two cruciate ligaments cross over one another.

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Cruciate Ligament Library

Library of excerpts from the medical literature about Cruciate Ligaments, with links to PubMed

Rehabilitation after cruciate ligament reconstruction has some special challenges, and it is helpful that patients understand why.

Knee bones from front (bent knee)

Brief introduction to the bony anatomy of the knee, with clear illustrations.

Knee anatomy intro

This page demonstrates the bones of the knee - femur, tibia, and patella. The shock-absorbing menisci fill the gap between the rounded ends of the femur bone and the flattened upper surface of the tibia bone. The cruciate ligaments act as a 'stay' to allow movement of the femur and tibia, without the movement being excessive.

Cruciate Ligaments

An overview of the many issues facing a patient with a cruciate ligament tear.

Image of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Practical Surgical Guide

This is a clinical text written by experts for experts, and has over 500 pages of well-indexed detail and is richly illustrated in colour. It is not a beginner's book.

Who's Who in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery?

This section lists knee surgeons who the KNEEguru website has identified as having expertise or a special interest in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee.

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Children represent a special problem when it comes to tears of the cruciate ligaments. Feel free to download this fully-illustrated eBook on ACL Repair in Children written by knee surgeon, Professor Adrian Wilson.

acl repair in children